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BlogWells Fargo Preview and Picks

Wells Fargo Championship

May 1 – 4, 2014

Quail Hollow Club

Charlotte,, N.C.

Par: 72 / Yardage: 7,562

Purse: $6.9 million

with $1,242,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Derek Ernst

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 20 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with two players from the top-ten: #9 Phil Mickelson and #10 Justin Rose. The other top 50 players are #11 Rory McIlroy, #12 Zach Johnson, #21 Jimmy Walker, #22 Jim Furyk, #26 Jamie Donaldson, #28 Hideki Matsuyama, #29 Webb Simpson, #30 Lee Westwood, #32 Bill Haas, #34 Jonas Blixt, #36 Rickie Fowler, #38 Ryan Moore, #41 Matt Jones, #44 Russell Henley, #45 Ernie Els, #47 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, #48 Kevin Streelman and #50 Gary Woodland.

The field includes 11 of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2014.  Those players are #1 Jimmy Walker, #8 Chris Kirk, #10 Zach Johnson, #11 Webb Simpson, #13 Ryan Moore, #15 Will MacKenzie, #16 Seung-Yul Noh, #17 Kevin Na, #19 Brian Stuard, #21 Matt Jones and #24 Russell Henley.

The field includes 13 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list. Those players are #2 Jimmy Walker, #8 Chris Kirk, #10 Zach Johnson, #11 Webb Simpson, #12 Ryan Moore, #15 Will MacKenzie, #18 Seung-Yul Noh, #20 Kevin Na, #22 Brian Stuard, #23 Russell Henley, #24 Gary Woodland and #25 Rickie Fowler.

The field includes seven of it’s eleven past champions: Derek Ernst (2013), Rickie Fowler (2012), Lucas Glover (2011), Rory McIlroy (2010), Sean O’Hair (2009), Jim Furyk (2006) and Vijay Singh (2005).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the Wells Fargo Championship field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the Wells Fargo Championship in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the Wells Fargo Championship.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Be sure to join us on Saturday for the return of “Who will win the Wells Fargo Championship”

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the Wells Fargo Championship

Player Honda Classic Arnold Palmer Zurich Classic RBC Heritage Shell Houston Valero Texas Valspar Champ. Puerto Rico Masters Maybank Malaysian Volvo China WGC Accenture WGC Cadillac
Lee Westwood
(275.17 pts)
T46
(1.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T17
(22)
DNP DNP DNP 7
(110)
Win
(132)
DNP T33
(8.5)
T34
(8)
Jonas Blixt
(223.5 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T2
(200)
DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
T16
(17)
Rickie Fowler
(220 pts)
T24
(8.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-10)
DNP 6
(40)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(140)
DNP DNP 3
(45)
T44
(3)
Jim Furyk
(212 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T7
(55)
DNP T6
(40)
T20
(10)
DNP T14
(72)
DNP DNP T5
(35)
T62
(0)
Rory McIlroy
(199 pts)
T2
(33.33)
DNP DNP DNP T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
T25
(12.5)
Seung-Yul Noh
(171.33 pts)
T33
(5.67)
T35
(10)
Win
(132)
DNP WD
(-3.33)
T16
(22.67)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Jimmy Walker
(169 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T24
(17.33)
T16
(22.67)
DNP DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
T25
(12.5)
Justin Rose
(156.5 pts)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP DNP T8
(16.67)
DNP T14
(72)
DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
T34
(8)
Jamie Donaldson
(135.17 pts)
T55
(0)
T43
(4.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T14
(72)
DNP DNP T33
(8.5)
T2
(50)
Ben Martin
(131.67 pts)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T15
(35)
T3
(90)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
3
(30)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Andrew Svoboda
(124.67 pts)
DNP DNP T2
(100)
DNP DNP T26
(16)
DNP T24
(8.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Bill Haas
(122.17 pts)
DNP DNP DNP WD
(-5)
T37
(8.67)
DNP T14
(12)
DNP T20
(60)
DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
T6
(30)
J.B. Holmes
(119.67 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
T10
(26.67)
T11
(39)
T18
(32)
T12
(25.33)
T64
(0)
T54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Jason Kokrak
(112.33 pts)
T41
(3)
4
(53.33)
DNP T12
(38)
CUT
(-6.67)
T31
(12.67)
T14
(12)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Robert Streb
(112 pts)
DNP DNP T2
(100)
DNP DNP T72
(0)
DNP T14
(12)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Gary Woodland
(110.17 pts)
DNP T20
(20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T8
(16.67)
DNP T26
(48)
DNP DNP T33
(8.5)
T16
(17)
Chris Kirk
(109.17 pts)
T12
(12.67)
T60
(0)
DNP T27
(23)
T65
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T20
(60)
DNP DNP T33
(8.5)
T40
(5)
Russell Henley
(103.5 pts)
Win
(44)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-10)
T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP DNP T31
(38)
DNP DNP DNP T47
(1.5)
Will MacKenzie
(98 pts)
T6
(20)
T43
(4.67)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T2
(66.67)
T4
(26.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Daniel Summerhays
(95 pts)
T12
(12.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
T21
(29)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T2
(66.67)
T70
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Chesson Hadley
(92.67 pts)
T24
(8.67)
T26
(16)
DNP T38
(12)
DNP T56
(0)
T14
(12)
Win
(44)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Hunter Mahan
(92.33 pts)
DNP WD
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-10)
T31
(12.67)
DNP DNP DNP T26
(48)
DNP DNP T9
(22.5)
T9
(22.5)
Cameron Tringale
(90.33 pts)
T41
(3)
T56
(0)
T17
(33)
CUT
(-10)
4
(53.33)
T46
(2.67)
T25
(8.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Matt Jones
(85.33 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
T14
(24)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Rory Sabbatini
(80.33 pts)
T33
(5.67)
WD
(-3.33)
T17
(33)
T9
(45)
DNP DNP T70
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the Wells Fargo Championship

Player Honda Classic Arnold Palmer Zurich Classic RBC Heritage Shell Houston Valero Texas Valspar Champ. Puerto Rico Masters Maybank Malaysian Volvo China WGC Accenture WGC Cadillac
Roberto Castro
(-46.67 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
76
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP T58
(0)
Scott Stallings
(-38.17 pts)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T33
(8.5)
DNP
D.A. Points
(-36.67 pts)
T61
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
T52
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP T62
(0)
John Peterson
(-33.33 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
T67
(0)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Paul Goydos
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
T70
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Angel Cabrera
(-28.67 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Mark Wilson
(-28.67 pts)
T46
(1.33)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Martin Laird
(-26.67 pts)
DNP 76
(0)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Heath Slocum
(-23.33 pts)
79
(0)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
John Rollins
(-23.33 pts)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP 74
(0)
CUT
(-10)
T65
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
T58
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

I don’t know if anybody else is starting to feel like they are watching a Web.Com tour event these Sundays.  The leaderboard in New Orleans looked like one as only Keegan Bradley and Justin Rose were the only true marquee players in the top-ten.  How about CBS, gosh they have become completely unwatchable as it seems that they are just phoning it in.  Nick Faldo has been good but Jim Nantz has gotten so syrupy that you feel he is on the PGA Tour payroll.  In events like this they need to be better in telling us about these players and educate us on the course and doing a better job in showing the field instead of just a handful of players.  All we seem to get is a steady stream of shot after shot after shot, must of them on tape with the results already shown on PGA Tour.Com leaderboard.

Now if a week ago you would of asked me to rate the field, I would of put Seung-Yul Noh about 120th of the field of 156 with no chance of winning.  Can someone educate me on how Noh won?  Maybe it was the ferry accident in his home country Korea that got him rolling but since joining the tour in 2012 it’s all about making money for him.  Guess we have to give him some credit, it’s the first time he was in contention going into the back nine and he did hold on for the win.  Last year at this time he was missing his eight cut in his 12 starts and had such a poor season he has to participant in the Web.Com Tour finals just to save his card.  He did it in fine fashion winning the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship which help him regain his card for 2014.  For the year he has been better, in 13 starts before New Orleans he only missed one cut and had three top-25 finishes.  Still there was no indication of him winning and it’s been a big mystery on how half the players have done so.

The big problem I see is that this is our future, a lot more events with non-marquee names on the leaderboard over the weekend and more obscure winners like Seung-Yul Noh.  I for one is going crazy and it’s driving me to watch more LPGA events which have had fun Sunday’s in which marquee names are winning.  It seems I have a bigger rooting interest in that tour plus the Golf Channel does a much better job of covering tournaments than CBS does.  They don’t phone it in for the woman.

So what are some of the problems?  First of all and I think the number one problem, there is way too much money on the PGA Tour.  Already this year there are 47 players that have earned over a million dollars.  With 93 players winning over a half a million dollars I can see over a hundred players making a million dollars this year.  The purses are too big, the four players tied for 25th earned $54,230.  I see it so easy for players to just finish in the top-25 and earn after expenses more than most of the people that work hard as secretaries, nurses, teachers and policeman earn in a year.  I don’t mean to pick on him but I just saw a segment of Inside the PGA Tour on Pat Perez who lives high on the hog like the millionaire in Arizona.  He has played the tour now for 13 years and won only once but has earnings of $15.3 million and lives the life of Donald Trump.  I don’t mean to pick on these guys, yes they have worked hard to get at this level but I really feel it’s too easy for them.  20 years ago only about a quarter of the field that teed it up had a chance of winning, now it’s like 75%.  So there are no real heros anymore to root for week in and week out.  Making it even sadder the ones we do like to root for only seem to play majors, WGC events and a handful of PGA Tour events.  Last week Zurich had a terrible field, gosh even this week the field at Wells Fargo isn’t as stellar as past years.  So the reality is that the PGA Tour is becoming an important draw like one in four weeks.  This is the reason that outside of organizations like the PGA Tour nobody is making money in golf.  Without heros to watch week in and week out, the PGA Tour has become a part-time sport in which you only watch in big weeks when all the players deem it’s best to play.  Sure the tour is completely full of sponsors each week that are willing to fork over nine, ten and up to 12 million to sponsor events in which fans really don’t care.  On top of that you aren’t getting good TV  because they are just phoning it in and going from stop to stop to stop.  Now NBC does a much better job but frankly TV telecasts haven’t changed in years.  Yes every now and then NBC has a pro-tracker and some other innovations, but the graphics are the same old thing that was done 15 years ago and nothing has changed.  When I watch the Washington Nationals on MASN Sports, they seem to have more excitement and drive on each game than CBS does as we hear the same “Hello Friends” from Jim Nantz week after week after week.  That is the problem with having these ten year contracts it doesn’t give incentive to give not only good coverage but something that is innovative.  Even the Masters telecast was not very interesting, maybe that’s why the ratings were down.  I do know this, each year I look forward to hearing Mike Tricio do the British Open on ESPN, they do the best job of the year.  I can only hope that Fox is successful in their U.S. Open telecast and gives us something more to watch.  Now I am not ripping NBC who does a better job on Golf, they still can do a much better job, but they do work hard each week, something that doesn’t happen with CBS.

Sorry to waste your time on this, but I really feel it’s important because if I, the biggest golf fan in the world is struggling with this I can see why more casual golf fans are turning the sport off.

Things you need to know about the Wells Fargo:

  • This is the twelve year of the Wells Fargo Championship, which is played at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina.  The course was the site of the Kemper Open from 1969 through 1979 before it was moved to Washington D.C.  With the advent of Wachovia coming into the picture and Quail Hollow being used, the tournament gained instant recognition and has been one of the most popular events on tour, not only in player attendance but with spectators as well. For the ninth year in a row the event is sold out.
  • In 2008 Wachovia was bought out by Wells Fargo and with the problems associated with banks sponsoring tournaments Wells Fargo decided to take the Wachovia name off the tournament.  Wells Fargo continued to sponsor the tournament after its purchase of Wachovia, but dropped it’s name and decided to be pretty hands off and more of a background player. In 2011 they put got more involved and put there name back into the event.  The owners of Quail Hollow seemed more interested in having a major, getting the 2017 PGA Championship.  But they are now just as excited about this event and it’s future looks good.

Course information:

  • Quail Hollow Golf Club
  • Charlotte, N.C.
  • 7,562 yards     Par 36-36–72
  • Quail Hollow features a course rating of 75.0 and a slope rating from the back tees of 140. The tees, fairway, and rough are 419 bermudaGrass with Perennial Ryegrass.  The greens were changed after last years event and are Mini Verde Ultrdwarf.
  • The main reason that the players love this event is because of the course. Located in Charlotte, North Carolina it’s considered one of the most exclusive clubs in America and in the players’ eyes one of the best challenges. Many consider it a “U.S. Open-type” venue as it was the 10th hardest course on the PGA Tour playing to a 73.043 average which is 1.043 strokes over par.  Players loved the course so much that the word filtered down and help get more marquee players to come, but in the last couple of years that trend has changed as less marquee names are showing up.
  • The property was originally a dairy farm owned by former North Carolina Governor Cameron Morrison. In the late 1950s, a group of affluent men decided to create a private club patterned after the Peachtree Golf Club in Atlanta. George Cobb was recruited to design the course and it opened in June, 1961. In order to attract members, one of the founding members enlisted the help of a close friend, Arnold Palmer. Palmer liked the course so much, he was instrumental in bringing the Kemper Open to Quail Hollow. The event was played there from 1969-79, then abruptly moved to Washington, D.C. in 1980.
  • Palmer didn’t forget Quail Hollow. When he began playing the Champions Tour in 1980, he worked to bring the Paine Webber Invitational to Quail Hollow, where it was played between 1983-88.  Palmer tinkered with the course in the late ’80s, but a major renovation was done by Tom Fazio in 1997.
  • The average green size is 6,500, which is about average and the course is dotted with 62 bunkers.  Water comes into play on six holes (7, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18).  Along with the changing of the greens course architect Tom Fazio changed the 8th hole making it play straight and now is potentially a drive-able par 4.  He also made a major change to 16, adding 18 yards to the hole and bringing the lake into play.  This hole will be a brute and probably be one of the ten toughest holes on the PGA Tour in 2014.  He also changed 17, moving the tee to the right and adding 20 yards to the hole.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the Wells Fargo Championship:

Key stat for the winner:

Since the course will play at more than 7,500 yards, the “experts” will say bombers hold an advantage. But as you will see length is not the only strength you need to play well at Quail Hollow.  Three of the eight winners (Jim Furyk, David Toms and Joey Sindelar) do not have the reputation as long hitters even though the 2005 winner Vijay Singh, Tiger Woods, Anthony Kim, Sean O’Hair, Rory McIlroy and last year’s winner Derek Ernst do.  So it’s a 50/50 proposition on if longer hitters have an advantage.

  • This is one of those courses that will get you ready for a U.S. Open.  As a matter of fact it would be a perfect Open venue because of its length, tight fairways with three-inch plus rough, tree line and fast undulating greens.  It always ranks as one of the toughest courses on tour.
  • Accuracy will probably again not be a factor if you look at the statistics of the 11 winners.  Last year Derek Ernst finished T13th in accuracy which is fourth best of all the champions in accuracy just above 2003 winner David Toms will was T2nd, 2012 winner Rickie Fowler who was T2nd followed by 2006 winner Jim Furyk who was 3rd.  Looking at this myth of driving accuracy on a course like Quail Hollow, things have changed.  Even though in past years fairways were very narrow and earned the reputation as narrowest on tour, of the 20 players that finished in the top-five in the tournament’s first three years, 15 of them finished in the top-20 of the driving accuracy category.  Things changed drastically in 2006 when only five players out of the top 21 finished in the top-ten of the driving distance category.  In 2007 it was even worse as only two of the top-20 finished high in fairway accuracy.  Things did improve in 2008 as five of the top-fifteen were in the top-ten in driving accuracy but with all of the rain the fairways were soft and help cause that.  In 2009 and 2010 only one player in the top-ten was in the top-ten in driving accuracy so it looked like just because you see tight fairways doesn’t mean you have to hit it straight. But the trend changed.  In 2011 and 2012 four of the top-ten were in the top-ten in driving accuracy, while in 2013 five of the top-15 were in the top-ten so maybe accuracy is becoming more important off the tee.
  • Hitting greens will be at a premium, just like in a U.S. Open hitting lots of greens goes a long way in this event.  Look for the winner to hit globs of greens this week, in the first six years Anthony Kim was the only player out of the top-11 in this stat, he finished T17th in greens hit in 2008.  In 2009 Sean O’Hair was T3rd while in 2010 Rory McIlroy was T4th.  In 2011 Lucas Glover was T27th, Rickie Fowler was T5th in 2012 while Derek Ernst was T3rd last year.
  •  Good putters should have a field day this week. Green speeds were lowered in 2008 and Anthony Kim was 2nd in total putts.  But it popped up in 2009 as Sean O’Hair was T47th, the worst of any champion.  In 2010 McIlroy was T38th in this category while in 2011 Glover was 3rd.  In 2012 Fowler was T40th while last year Derek Ernst was T34th.
  • The course is demanding but as it goes into year 11 the pros are starting to learn it better and shoot lower scores.  In the first three years the winning score has come down a stroke a year except for in 2006 when it stayed the same at 276. In 2007 Tiger Woods broke the tournament record shooting 275, while Anthony Kim brought things even lower with his 272 total.  The next year McIlroy shot 273 the same score as Lucas Glover did in 2011.  But with the advent of the 2017 PGA being played on the course it’s had some changes as Rickie Fowler shot 274 in 2012 with Derek Ernst jumping up to 280 last year
  • Lastly one of the keys to mastering Quail Hollow is playing well on the final three holes, which has been dubbed “The Green Mile”.  Showing the difficultly of this stretch, in 2013 16, 17 and 18 were all in the top-80 of the PGA Tour’s hardest holes.  With the changes done to 16 it could jump into the top-50.
  • Now I don’t want to jinx the tournament, but weather in North Carolina should be picture-perfect for the four days of the championship, despite all of the bad weather in the mid-west and eastern seaboard and the bad weather the course will have on Tuesday and Wednesday.

 

 

 

Who to watch for at the Wells Fargo Championship

Best Bets:

Rory McIlroy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T10 T2 CUT Win

Hasn’t panned out the last couple of times he has played, but I still think that there is good things right around the corner for him.

Justin Rose

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T28 CUT CUT T47 T44

This is just like a U.S. Open course, should be right up his alley.

Ryan Moore

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T6 T5 T33 CUT CUT CUT T75

He would follow the mold of other obscure players to win of late.

Best of the rest:

Rickie Fowler

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T73 Win T16 6

We have talked a lot the last month about him getting in contention, he has the right course to do it on.

Lee Westwood

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T4 T5 T38 T61 CUT

Was a winner again a week ago in Malaysia, watch him play well this week.

Jim Furyk

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T26 T24 T7 T11 7 CUT Win T2 CUT

Past winner coming into this week playing well again.

Zach Johnson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T65 T69 T6 T51 T11 T25 84 CUT CUT CUT

Hasn’t played well since Texas Open, looking to regain that winning form again.

Solid contenders

Nick Watney

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T10 8 CUT T22 T22 T40 T24 21 T11

Game has not been sharp this year, but that can all change this week.

Phil Mickelson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
3 T26 T9 2 T5 T12 T3 T35 T7 T5

With the U.S. Open just six weeks away, it’s time to get his game into prime time again.

Jimmy Walker

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T22 T48 T68 CUT CUT CUT CUT

Another person that we should watch this week.

Webb Simpson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T32 4 T21 CUT CUT

This should be the perfect course for him, he could be very sneaky on his way to the winners circle.

Long shots that could come through:

Geoff Ogilvy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T38 T21 T38 T32 T22 T24 T10 T22 T10

Time for him to break out of this two year funk he has been on.

Ben Martin

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT

Watch him, has been playing very well of late.

J.B. Holmes

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T57 T9 CUT CUT T17 T34 WD

Another guy that is finding his game right now.

Comments

  1. alex munro says:

    Who is to say those winning this year won,t become the top players of the future. That being said the tours worth watching are the ladies and the seniors ! Least you have a chance of a winning bet. Will Mckenzie looks a future winner but maybe not this week, wide open this week

  2. Just look at how many first time winners have never been heard from again. In the last ten years, only 28% of first time winners ever win again on the PGA Tour. It’s the tour’s dirty little secret, lot’s of players make a million and are never heard from again.
    Perfect example of this is defending Wells Fargo champion Derek Ernst. Since winning the Wells Fargo he has played in 30 events, missing 18 cuts and his best finish is 30th in the Hyundai Tournament of Champions. Oh, there was only 30 players in the field so he was dead last.
    In some respects you are right, one or two of the winners this year could become a top player, but as you can see the odds are against that happening.

  3. One last thing, we all love to foresee a winner each week. It’s become very hard to do that now on the PGA Tour. No matter what people would say about Tiger Woods, he was unbelievable between 1999 and 2008 and golf misses having a dominate player, even thought we may not like him as a person.

  4. Couldn’t agree more with you Sal. It has become quite the crapshoot trying to figure out who will win tournaments this year. Seems like most of the winners are guys that come out of no where, with only 1 or 2 big name guys in contention on Sunday.

  5. Again I really think that money is ruining things. Players are being very picky on the events they play in. Gosh, look at Bubba Watson, he wins the Masters and won’t play the Wells Fargo and Zurich, two events he won in the last five years. If a tournament can’t get a defending champion to come back that is not a good sign. Also look at Wells Fargo. In 2011 five of the top-ten ranked players were in the field. This year only two as the marquee names just aren’t playing in regular events anymore. Example look at how many marquee players are playing less this year (since October, there have been 24 events)
    Bubba Watson has played 9 of 24 events
    Dustin Johnson has played 8 of 24 events
    Zach Johnson has played 12 of 24 events
    Jason Day (yes been hurt last 7 weeks) but only played 4 of 24 events
    Luke Donald has played 8 of 24 events
    Sergio Garcia has played 7 of 24 events
    Rory McIlroy has played 6 of 24 events
    Adam Scott has played 6 of 24 events
    Jim Furyk 8 of 24 events
    Justin Rose 8 of 24 events
    Jason Dufner 8 of 24 events
    Henrik Stenson 7 of 24 events
    Phil Mickelson 10 of 24 events
    Steve Stricker 4 of 24 events

    So you get my point???

  6. Again, agree 100%. Easy to take for granted the days when Tiger showed up and competed at most tournaments.

  7. I have not seen this problem addressed anywhere in the golf media. I feel it it a huge problem that must be addressed. Already this year we have seen the following players withdraw early:
    Phil Michelson, Fredrik Jacobson and Rocko Mediate in the Farmers Ins Open
    Briney Baird at the ATT Pebble Beach
    Darren Clark at the Northern Trust Open
    Tiger Woods and Hideki Matsuyama at the Honda Classic
    Nick Watney at the World Golf Championship
    Blake Adams at the Valspar Championship
    Bubba Watson at the Arnold Palmer Invite
    Ricky Barnes at the Valero Texas Open
    Nicolas Colsaerts and Dustin Johnson at the Shell Houston Open
    Bill Haas at the RBC Heritage
    and Matt Every last week at the Zurich Classic in New Orleans
    Last year Rory McIlroy walked off a course with a supposed toothache.

    The fans who pay money to attend these tournaments deserve better. Some of these may be legitimate injuries but I bet a number are just players embarrassed by their bad rounds and choosing to quit. I feel strongly that penalties need to accessed to golfers who withdraw. They should be forced to sit out the next tournament that they have committed to play in. Act like real athletes and finish the tournament. I agree with Sal, they make so much money that they don’t even care if they walk off the course and go home early. They don’t need the money.

  8. Again I have said this many times, money on the PGA Tour is so good that these guys are becoming prima-donnas. You don’t see this in the press because there isn’t many press people left, there is no bias in reporting. You think Golf Channel would do this story, hell no. They are the biggest shills for the PGA Tour who wants the illusion that everything is great and rosy out there.

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