Welcome to GOLFstats.com! You are currently viewing a special post on GOLFstats.com .
For the best experience and full access to GOLFstats.com, CLICK HERE to sign up for a $15 one month GOLFstats Ultimate account!

BlogFedEx St. Jude Preview and Picks

FedEx St. Jude Classic

June 5 – 8, 2014

TPC at Southwind

Germantown, Tenn.

Par: 70 / Yardage: 7,239

Purse: $5.8 million

with $1,044,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Harris English

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 12 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with no players in the top-ten now that Matt Kuchar has WD. The other top 50 players are #11 Phil Mickelson, #14 Zach Johnson, #15 Dustin Johnson, #22 Graeme McDowell, #24 Ian Poulter, #26 Patrick Reed, #29 Lee Westwood, #33 Webb Simpson, #39 Rickie Fowler, #47 Harris English, $49 John Senden and #50 Russell Henley, #48 Chris Kirk and #49 Matt Every.  Last year this event had 8 top-50 players so their are five more playing this year.

The field includes 11 of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2014.  Those players are #4 Dustin Johnson, #7 Patrick Reed, #8 Harris English, #13 Zach Johnson, #15 John Senden, #16 Matt Every, #18 Webb Simpson, #19 Kevin Stadler, #22 Charles Howell III, #24 Ryan Palmer, and #25 Will MacKenzie.

The field includes 8 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list, those players are #3 Dustin Johnson,  #6 Patrick Reed, #9 Harris English, #15 Zach Johnson, #17 John Senden, #18 Webb Simpson, #19 Matt Every and #24 Kevin Stadler.

The field includes 14 players that have won 14 events on the PGA Tour this year: Webb Simpson (Shriners Hospitals); Dustin Johnson (WGC-HSBC Champions); Harris English (OHL Classic at Mayakoba); Zach Johnson (Hyundai T of C); Patrick Reed (Humana & Cadillac); Scott Stallings (Farmers); Kevin Stadler (WM Phoenix); Russell Henley (Honda); Chesson Hadley (Puerto Rico); John Senden (Valspar Championship); Matt Every (Palmer); Steven Bowditch (Palmer);  Seung-Yul Noh (Zurich) and J.B. Holmes (Wells Fargo).

The field includes nine past champions: Harris English (2013), Dustin Johnson (2012), Lee Westwood (2010), Brian Gay (2009), Justin Leonard (2008 & ’05), Woody Austin (2007), Jeff Maggert (2006), David Toms (2004, ’03), and Dicky Pride (1994).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the FedEx St. Jude field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the FedEx St. Jude in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the FedEx St. Jude.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the FedEx St. Jude Classic

Player Memorial Nordea Masters Colonial BMW PGA Byron Nelson Open Espana The Players Wells Fargo Zurich Classic Volvo China RBC Heritage Maybank Malaysian Masters
Matt Kuchar
(203.67 pts)
T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T7
(55)
DNP T17
(33)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(44)
DNP T5
(46.67)
John Senden
(180.33 pts)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
DNP T11
(39)
DNP T26
(24)
DNP T29
(14)
DNP DNP DNP T8
(33.33)
Lee Westwood
(156.5 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T35
(22.5)
DNP DNP T6
(60)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(44)
7
(36.67)
David Hearn
(122.33 pts)
T28
(22)
DNP T21
(29)
DNP DNP DNP T6
(60)
T44
(4)
T34
(10.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
J.B. Holmes
(114.67 pts)
T75
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
Win
(88)
T11
(26)
DNP T18
(10.67)
DNP DNP
Charles Howell III
(112 pts)
T57
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T3
(90)
DNP CUT
(-10)
T18
(21.33)
T34
(10.67)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP DNP
Robert Streb
(108.67 pts)
T28
(22)
DNP T38
(12)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T23
(18)
T2
(66.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ian Poulter
(102.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T26
(36)
DNP DNP T65
(0)
DNP DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP T20
(20)
Paul Casey
(97.67 pts)
T13
(37)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T16
(34)
DNP DNP DNP T11
(26)
DNP T18
(10.67)
DNP DNP
David Toms
(95.33 pts)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
DNP T48
(2)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(23.33)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP DNP
Freddie Jacobson
(95 pts)
T49
(1)
DNP T3
(90)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP 64
(0)
DNP T29
(14)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Charley Hoffman
(93.67 pts)
T19
(31)
DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T38
(12)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP T38
(4)
DNP DNP
Martin Flores
(93 pts)
T19
(31)
DNP DNP DNP T59
(0)
DNP T48
(2)
3
(60)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ryan Palmer
(91.33 pts)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
DNP T22
(28)
DNP T59
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Dustin Johnson
(88.33 pts)
T46
(4)
DNP T14
(36)
DNP T7
(55)
DNP T59
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
Ben Martin
(84 pts)
T49
(1)
DNP T21
(29)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T50
(0.67)
T15
(23.33)
DNP T3
(30)
DNP DNP
Kevin Kisner
(82.67 pts)
T46
(4)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T16
(34)
DNP DNP T6
(40)
T34
(10.67)
DNP T38
(4)
DNP DNP
Andrew Svoboda
(81.67 pts)
T19
(31)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T44
(4)
T2
(66.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Robert Garrigus
(79.67 pts)
T28
(22)
DNP DNP DNP T29
(21)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP 73
(0)
DNP DNP
Michael Thompson
(69 pts)
T37
(13)
DNP T10
(40)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
T11
(26)
T67
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Boo Weekley
(67.33 pts)
DNP DNP 75
(0)
DNP T5
(70)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T29
(14)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
Seung-Yul Noh
(61.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T72
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
Win
(88)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Billy Horschel
(61 pts)
T15
(35)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T26
(24)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T68
(0)
DNP T37
(8.67)
Nicholas Thompson
(59.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T3
(90)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T12
(12.67)
DNP DNP
Stewart Cink
(55 pts)
T49
(1)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T38
(12)
T23
(18)
DNP DNP T61
(0)
DNP T14
(24)

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the FedEx St. Jude Classic

Player Memorial Nordea Masters Colonial BMW PGA Byron Nelson Open Espana The Players Wells Fargo Zurich Classic Volvo China RBC Heritage Maybank Malaysian Masters
Woody Austin
(-43.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP DNP
D.A. Points
(-43.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
Will MacKenzie
(-36.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Trevor Immelman
(-35 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T45
(5)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T74
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
Chesson Hadley
(-32.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T38
(4)
DNP DNP
Scott Stallings
(-30 pts)
T65
(0)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T65
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
Darren Clarke
(-27.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T44
(4)
Matt Every
(-27.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP WD
(-3.33)
DNP T12
(12.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
James Driscoll
(-26.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T64
(0)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Chad Collins
(-26.67 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T45
(3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

Sorry but the news is more about the U.S. Open and what is going to happen next week at Pinehurst than on what is happening in Memphis for the FedEx St. Jude Classic.  Qualifying for the U.S. Open is over and it’s always intriguing the list of players that make it into the U.S. Open.

It’s an interesting question on what is better of each of the four majors in determining their own fields. The philosophy of Augusta National in trying to get the best players, but in a limited dose.  If you want the best field in golf the PGA Championship always comes close, that’s because they invite the top-100 off the world rankings.  Now the USGA invites the top-50 but the rest they give back to qualifying.

In a way this keeps the tradition of making it open to all players around the country and around the world.  Many say that for the PGA Championship to invite the 51st to 100th it looks great on paper having all of these top players, but the emphasis is lost on those players because it just mirrors any other tournament on the PGA Tour and European Tour in getting the most of their membership in tournaments.

Now the British Open to a degree let’s in folks based on a qualifying system.  But over the years it’s gotten a bit water down and only about a dozen spots are open to regular qualifiers before the Open Championship.  But the U.S. Open is still back to the way they use to do qualifying 75 years ago as of the 11 sites that had Open qualifying on Monday, about 52 of those in the field will come out of these qualifying sites.  Of course the bulk of the qualifiers will be made up of players on the PGA Tour and Web.Com Tours, but there are about a dozen players like Gavin Hall, Jim Herman, Grayson Murray and Kevin Phelan to pick out a few which nobody have ever heard of.  So the question is, which is the best way to run a major championship?  Do we just allow the best players in the world in, if that’s the case we have that in the Players Championship.  Or do we allow any golfer that is really good to possibly play?

I feel that the British Open has it right in keeping their championship open to all but at the same time having the best players in the world also qualifying.  Yes the U.S. Open has qualifying for players in Europe and Japan and 17 got in off of that.  But the Royal and Ancient goes a step further and has a qualifying tournament in Australia, Asia and South Africa also, something that would be nice for the USGA to also offer.  Another group of folks forgotten is those for South America, especially with golf being played in the Olympics in 2016 down in Rio, these folks need to be included.  The bottom line for all these championships, it’s a hard mix to get it right and to also do what they have traditionally done for all these years.

Lastly, in past the FedEx St. Jude has always been a great spot to warm up for the U.S. Open because they have narrow fairways with high rough.  This year since rough won’t be seen at Pinehurst, it’s more pine straw and scrub waste areas so players won’t be able to get ready as well this week.  Still the greens at TPC Southwind are high so look for many balls running off the greens and giving players chances to practice their short game.

Tournament information:

  • The St. Jude Classic began in 1958 as the Memphis Open. Started by seven local businessmen, the tournament became their vision while in the grill of the Colonial Country Club in Memphis. With an initial purse of $20,000, winner Billy Maxwell collected $2,800. The modern St. Jude Championship began two years later in 1960. The founders of the Memphis Open donated $600 to entertainer Danny Thomas, who helped found the St. Jude Charity. That year, the tournament was renamed the Memphis Invitational Open.
  • The tournament consistently grew throughout the ’60s. By 1969, Danny Thomas decided to lend his name to the tournament and in 1970, the first Danny Thomas Memphis Classic was played. That same year, the St. Jude Children’s Hospital became the event’s only charity. In 1972, The Danny Thomas Memphis Classic changed courses to the Colonial Country Club South Course in Cordova, Tenn. Lee Trevino won the first tournament at the new course. It was his second straight victory. Trevino would go on to claim the title a third time in 1980.
  • In 1977, the Danny Thomas Memphis Classic welcomed former president Gerald Ford, who was out of office and playing a lot of golf. Ford competed in the Celebrity Pro-Am, and amazingly, scored a hole-in-one on the fifth hole. However, that feat would soon be surpassed by Al Geiberger, who shot a record 59 in the second round of the tournament. Sports Illustrated called it “one of the most significant athletic achievements of the century.”
  • For the 1985 tournament, Danny Thomas and other tournaments officials decided it would be best if the tournament incorporated St. Jude’s more, so the tournament was re-named the St. Jude Memphis Classic. The name didn’t last long because, a year later, FedEx became the official sponsor of the event and re-named it the FedEx St. Jude Classic.
  • In 1989, the FedEx St. Jude Championship underwent its second course change, this time to the TPC at Southwind. The tournament has been held at Southwind every year since. 2007 was the first year of the Stanford St. Jude Classic, but with the problems of the company there was a parting of the ways as the event but in 2010 FedEx came back to sponsor the tournament and has agreed to sponsor the event through 2014.  Now with all of the sponsorship problems, for the first time in the Tiger Woods/Tim Finchem era the purse of any event went down as in 2008 the purse was $6 million and in 2009 was just 5.6 million.  But in 2011 FedEx came back into the picture and retook sponsorship of the event.  Now the purse has raised to $5.8 million but the good news is that the future of the event is stable for the next couple of years.

Course information:

  • TPC Southwind
  • Germantown, Tenn.
  • 7,239 yards     Par 35-35–70
  • The TPC at Southwind opened in 1988 and became the home of the FedEx St. Jude Classic in 1989. The course was designed by Ron Prichard, with help from Hubert Green and Fuzzy Zoeller. The course opened as a small, tight course with lots of trees, bunkers and water hazards. Originally, Southwind featured zoysia grass on the fairways and bent grass on the greens. The course stayed this way until after the 2004 FedEx St. Jude Classic. Following the tournament’s conclusion, the course closed for renovation.
  • During the renovation, all of the greens were redone and the grass was switched from bent grass to Champion Bermuda Grass. Many of the fairways were narrowed and re-contoured to make an already tight course, even tighter. Additionally, 15 new bunkers were added, bringing the total number of sand traps to 96, three of the 10 water hazards were enlarged and more than 125 trees were planted on the course. Overall, the course yardage increased by more than 200 yards to its current length of 7,244 yards. After the renovation, the course’s rating went up to a 75.9 with a slope rating of 138.
  • In 2013 TPC Southwind played to an average of 70.760, three quarters of a shot over par and ranked 14th on the PGA Tour.  If players are looking for a breather during the St. Jude, they will find no solace at Southwind as 12 of the 18 holes played over par last year. The tight, difficult front 9 seems like a pre-cursor to the hellacious back. The trouble begins immediately, with numbers 10, 11, and 12. The trio provides a degree of difficulty, the par 4 10th played to a 4.121 average last year. The next hole can be tricky, it’s a 165-yard, par 3 that bears a close resemblance to the famed 17th hole island green at TPC Sawgrass.  The only difference is the target on this hole is double the size of the 17th at Sawgrass.  Another tough hole is number 14, a 231-yard par 3 that is annually on the list of “Most Difficult Par 3’s on Tour.”   The difficulty of the back 9 reaches a crescendo with holes 17 and 18.  Both par 4s, the 17th is a 490 yard par 4 that was the 134th toughest hole on the PGA Tour playing to a 4.188 average.  The 18th played the hardest at Southwind playing to a 4.253 average, the 69th toughest hole on the PGA Tour in 2013.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the FedEx St. Jude:

Key stat for the winner:

Major changes came to TPC Southwind six years ago making it tougher.  It’s a bit longer than before, but the landing areas in the fairways have always been generous and have stayed the same.   This doesn’t mean the course is a rollover. There is thick rough to contend with, but again those that hit it accurately will score low this week. One thing that all past champions have in common — except for Dicky Pride, Notah Begay, Jeff Maggert and Brian Gay  is the knack for hitting greens.  Most of the champions since 1990 not only did well the week of the FedEx, but also in the year they won as the chart below shows:

  • 2013 Harris English hit 48 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T9th, for the year he ranked 59th.
  • 2012 Dustin Johnson hit 50 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T4th, for the year he ranked 81st.
  • 2011 Harrison Frazar hit 50 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T8th, for the year he ranked 164th.
  • 2010 Lee Westwood hit 47 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T9th, for the year he ranked 37th.
  • 2009 Brian Gay hit 49 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T19th, for the year he ranked 168th.
  • 2008 Justin Leonard hit 45 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T11th, for the year he ranked 54th.
  • 2007 Woody Austin hit 52 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 2nd, for the year he ranked 67th.
  • 2006 Jeff Maggert hit 39 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T47th, for the year he ranked 98th.
  • 2005 Justin Leonard hit 48 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T4th, for the year he ranked 94th.
  • 2004 David Toms hit 51 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T1st, for the year he ranked T20th.
  • 2003 David Toms hit 58 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 39th.
  • 2002 Len Mattiace< hit 53 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T11th, for the year he ranked 75th.
  • 2001 Bob Estes hit 50 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T22nd, for the year he ranked 45th.
  • 2000 Notah Begay III hit 50 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T16th, for the year he ranked 104th.
  • 1999 Ted Tryba hit 58 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 60th.
  • 1998 Nick Price hit 51 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T8th, for the year he ranked 89th.
  • 1997 Greg Norman hit 59 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 10th.
  •  1996 John Cook hit 61 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 9th.
  • 1995 Jim Gallagher, Jr. hit 50 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T26th, for the year he ranked 66th.
  • 1994 Dicky Pride hit 54 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T14th, for the year he ranked T152n.
  • 1993 Nick Price hit 55 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T12th, for the year he ranked 6th.
  • 1992 Jay Haas hit 57 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 36th.
  • 1991 Fred Couples hit 47 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked T29th, for the year he ranked 16th.
  • 1999 Tom Kite hit 54 of 72 greens at the St. Jude ranked 1st, for the year he ranked 3rd.

Here are some more key stats to look to for this week:

  • In picking a winner, it should be more feel than strategy.  You see hitting a lot of greens is important, but look at Jeff Maggert in 2006. He felt himself around the course, hitting lots of fairways (he was first) but more importantly he putted lights out (only took 99 for the week). So, yes, hitting greens is important, but when you take less than 100 putts for the week (only been done 131 times since 1997) you are going to win.  The same with Brian Gay in 2009, he didn’t hit as many greens as past champs but had only 100 putts which ranked 2nd.
  • Another trend that Maggert’s victory reintroduced was the non-marquee name winning.  In the last decade at Memphis, Maggert joins the list of winners that includes Len Mattiace, Bob Estes, Notah Began III and Ted Tryba.  Look at 2009 winner, Brian Gay and 2011 winner Harrison Frazar along with last year’s winner Harris English that is a perfect example of what I mean.  So don’t look for that marquee name to be on top of the leaderboard on Sunday, especially this year in which the tournament lacks marquee names.
  • In trying to pick a winner, look at those that seem to be just starting to play well.  Maybe this means those that have had a good finish in the Memorial last week or Colonial two weeks ago will prevail.  Look at how the last couple of winners have played, look for that kind of player to do well.  Also look for a player that has had tournaments ruined by one poor round.
  • Hitting greens will be at a premium. Just like in a U.S. Open, hitting lots of greens goes a long way in this event.  In the last 16 years, four champions lead the greens hit category and 12 of the 16 were in the top-11 of this category.  Look for the winner to hit globs of greens this week.
  • Look for a winning score of 269 this week, that’s the average winning total since TPC Southwind was first used in 1989.
  • Since 1989, only four champions (Dicky Pride in 1994, Notah Begay III in 2000, Dustin Johnson in 2012 and Harris English in 2013) were younger than 30.  Six of them were over 40, the oldest being Woody Austin in 2007 at 43 years, 4 months, Greg Norman in 1997 at 42 years, 4 months and 2006 winner Maggert who was 42 years, 3 months.  Last year’s winner Dustin Johnson was 27 while in 2011 Harrison Frazar was 40 days short of his 40th birthday while Brian Gay in 2010 was 37 years, one months old.
  • Before 2008, winning the FedEx St. Jude Classic had been part of big seasons for seven of the nine winners. Each had finished the season ranked in the top 25 on the PGA Tour money list the year that they were victorious at the TPC Southwind (Harris English was close, he was 27th last year). The players are Notah Begay III (2000, 20th), Bob Estes (2001, 9th), Len Mattiace (2002, 18th), David Toms (2003, 8th; 2004, 22nd), Justin Leonard (2005, 12th) and Woody Austin (2007, 15th).  Maggert broke that streak when he finished 60th on the money list.  In 2008 Justin Leonard was 33rd on the money list while 2009 winner Brian Gay was 13th.   2010 was a return to the winner having a big season, no two ways about it Lee Westwood had a monster season in 2010.  Same with Harrison Frazar who was on the verge of quitting the PGA Tour before being saved with his FedEx win in 2011 while Johnson in 2012 finished 17th on the money list.
  • Last but not least the weather.  This time in Memphis is always questionable with hot, muggy days that sometimes have rough thunderstorms in the afternoon.  The same for this week, temperatures are in the high 80s and each day of the tournament will have a 40% chance of late afternoon storms.

 

Who to watch for at the FedEx St. Jude Classic

Best Bets:

Ryan Palmer

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
4 T3 CUT CUT CUT T10

Watch him, has come close the last two years could the third one be the charm?

Dustin Johnson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T10 Win

Plays well on this course, he tends to play well the week before a major.

Lee Westwood

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T11 Win

Always has a knack of being ready a week too soon, for a major that is. Look for him to play well.

Best of the rest:

David Toms

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T56 CUT CUT T29 T2 T37 3 T10 2 Win Win 4

He used to own this course, knows how to win at Southwind.

Paul Casey

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
First time playing in this event

Has put together some good rounds of late, needs to have four consistent rounds.

Zach Johnson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T32 T12 T5

His type of course to shine on.

Graeme McDowell

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T7

Hasn’t been playing that much of late but he could surprise us

Solid contenders

Matt Kuchar – Has WD from the tournament

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T46 T38 CUT T26 T20 T5

Look for him to be working more on his game, if he is in contention it’s an added bonus but I don’t see him winning.

John Senden

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
69 T37 T4 CUT 9 CUT T18 T14 T54

Playing well right now, did finish T4th here in 2009.

Russell Henley

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T27

Another of those guys in which this course if perfect for.

Phil Mickelson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T2 T59

Strictly a place to get ready for Pinehurst, wouldn’t put much stock in his results this week, unless he wins.

Long shots that could come through:

Charles Howell III

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T39 T27 T3 T44 CUT CUT T9

Time for him to play well again.

Camilo Villegas

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T10 CUT T3 T8 T29 T18 T46 T16

Has been making some noise of late, good event for him he has a good track record here.

Ben Crane

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T18 T73 T12 T14 T39 T33 T6 CUT

Another of those guys that are looking to make a big comeback.

Comments

  1. Charles Joyce says:

    I believe the course was redesigned in 2004 going from a Par 71 to a Par 70 in 2005. From 2005 onwards no winner was in the previous year’s top 40 with 3 of the last 4 never having played the event previously. Every eventual winner since 2005 has made the top 20 in scrambling along with only Jeff Maggert missing the top 20 in greens in regulation. I like George McNeil in the last year he is 116th in greens in regulation, but 14th in the last 3 months. A similar story with his scrambling.

Speak Your Mind