Welcome to GOLFstats.com! You are currently viewing a special post on GOLFstats.com .
For the best experience and full access to GOLFstats.com, CLICK HERE to sign up for a $15 one month GOLFstats Ultimate account!

BlogRBC Canadian Open Preview and Picks

RBC Canadian Open

July 24 – 27, 2014

Royal Montreal G.C. (Blue Course)

Ile Bizard, Quebec, Canada

Par: 70 / Yardage: 7,153

Purse: $5.7 million

with $1,026,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Brandt Snedeker

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 9 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with two players from the top-ten, #7 Matt Kuchar and #10 Jim Furyk. The other top 50 players are #15 Dustin Johnson, #16 Graeme McDowell, #22 Charl Schwartzel, #24 Luke Donald, #35 Brandt Snedeker, #38 Graham DeLaet and #44 Hunter Mahan. Last year this event had 13 top-50 players, so four less top-50 players from last year.

The field includes 3 of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2014.  Those players are #3 Dustin Johnson, #4 Matt Kuchar and #14 Jim Furyk.

The field includes 3 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list. Those players are #3 Dustin Johnson, #6 Matt Kuchar and #8 Jim Furyk.

The field includes 3 players that have won 3 events on the PGA Tour this year: Dustin Johnson (WGC-HSBC Champions); Matt Kuchar (RBC Heritage) and Seung-Yul Noh (Zurich).

The field includes 10 past champions: Brandt Snedeker (2013), Scott Piercy (2012), Sean O’Hair (2011), Carl Pettersson (2010), Nathan Green (2009), Jim Furyk (2006 & ’07), Mark Calcavecchia (2005), Vijay Singh (2004), John Rollins (2002) and Billy Andrade (1998).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the RBC Canadian Open field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the RBC Canadian Open field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the RBC Canadian Open field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

Sorry for this being a day late, had a tough trip home from England yesterday.

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the RBC Canadian Open

Player British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier BMW Intern. Quicken Loans French Open Travelers Irish Open U.S. Open FedEx St. Jude Lyoness Open Memorial
Graeme McDowell
(300 pts)
T9
(90)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP Win
(132)
DNP T6
(40)
T28
(29.33)
T24
(8.67)
DNP DNP
Jim Furyk
(221 pts)
4
(160)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP T19
(10.33)
Dustin Johnson
(205.33 pts)
T12
(76)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T31
(12.67)
DNP T4
(106.67)
T24
(8.67)
DNP T46
(1.33)
Charl Schwartzel
(113.33 pts)
T7
(110)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T8
(16.67)
Erik Compton
(106 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T46
(2.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T2
(133.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Brandt Snedeker
(105.33 pts)
T58
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T21
(19.33)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP T9
(60)
DNP DNP DNP
Jerry Kelly
(102.67 pts)
DNP T3
(90)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T31
(12.67)
DNP DNP T65
(0)
DNP DNP
Jhonattan Vegas
(92 pts)
DNP T3
(90)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T31
(12.67)
DNP DNP T32
(6)
DNP DNP
Troy Merritt
(90.67 pts)
DNP T20
(30)
DNP T16
(34)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T67
(0)
DNP DNP 2
(33.33)
DNP DNP
Aaron Baddeley
(87 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP 4
(53.33)
DNP T23
(36)
DNP DNP T37
(4.33)
Charley Hoffman
(86.33 pts)
T67
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T3
(60)
DNP T26
(16)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T19
(10.33)
Carl Pettersson
(81.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP T55
(0)
DNP T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP T3
(30)
DNP T62
(0)
Scott Brown
(75.67 pts)
DNP T5
(70)
DNP T75
(0)
DNP T71
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T13
(12.33)
Matt Kuchar
(75 pts)
T54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T31
(12.67)
DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP T15
(11.67)
Will Wilcox
(73.67 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T19
(10.33)
DNP DNP
Johnson Wagner
(69 pts)
DNP T7
(55)
DNP T26
(24)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T57
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Bo Van Pelt
(65.33 pts)
DNP T7
(55)
DNP DNP DNP T64
(0)
DNP T67
(0)
DNP T63
(0)
DNP DNP T19
(10.33)
Chad Campbell
(65 pts)
DNP T13
(37)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP T46
(1.33)
DNP DNP
Tim Clark
(60.33 pts)
DNP T5
(70)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T19
(10.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Ben Crane
(57 pts)
DNP T37
(13)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP 74
(0)
DNP DNP Win
(44)
DNP DNP
Michael Putnam
(55 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP T24
(17.33)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T55
(0)
Charlie Beljan
(51 pts)
DNP T23
(27)
DNP T11
(39)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP WD
(-1.67)
DNP DNP
Joe Durant
(48.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T11
(39)
DNP DNP DNP T31
(12.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Andres Romero
(46.67 pts)
DNP T45
(5)
DNP T45
(5)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Luke Guthrie
(46 pts)
DNP T27
(23)
DNP T26
(24)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T43
(2.33)
DNP T8
(16.67)

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the RBC Canadian Open

Player British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier BMW Intern. Quicken Loans French Open Travelers Irish Open U.S. Open FedEx St. Jude Lyoness Open Memorial
Y.E. Yang
(-60 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Roberto Castro
(-36.67 pts)
CUT
(-20)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T73
(0)
DNP T30
(13.33)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
David Duval
(-33.33 pts)
CUT
(-20)
WD
(-5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP WD
(-1.67)
DNP DNP
Graham Delaet
(-33.33 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T51
(0)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Jim Herman
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Kevin Foley
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
James Driscoll
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T69
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Chad Collins
(-30 pts)
DNP T70
(0)
DNP T68
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Mark Wilson
(-30 pts)
DNP T63
(0)
DNP T86
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T72
(0)
Daniel Chopra
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Some thoughts on the British Open:

For years now we have all been under the Tiger Woods spell, and as we have seen in the last seven years, some of it isn’t pretty.  We loved the way he could win everytime he teed off, in some respects we made him a God because we all love winners and Tiger was not only a great winner but gave us more than possibly Ben Hogan. Still in a way golf may be suffering for this flaw.  Yes, we have Phil Mickelson and a few others that we can look toward, but golf is still looking for that one person that will replace Tiger.  I say that not by the fact that Woods hasn’t played well in a year, I know he has been hurt but frankly I find him hard to root for.  Not because of the way he plays which used to be magical.   It’s the overall aspect and attitude of Tiger.  The way he is so turned off by the overall meaning of being this hero to so many and his robotic way he treats folks.  He just isn’t a guy that I can get warm and fuzzy over and I find his act a bit harsh.  I sense others are in the same boat, especially when Tiger doesn’t play well.  On the other side of the coin, the PGA Tour has cracked out a steady stream of winners this year, most of them face-less and frankly hard to give them any “hero-status”  This has created a vacuum in which it’s no longer fun to watch events.  I am not saying that it’s terrible having some new blood win but frankly having guys like Brian Harman, Kevin Streelman and Ben Crane win once and then go back into obscurity doesn’t give us anything to look forward to on a week to week basis.

On the other hand in watching Rory McIlroy last week and hearing the way he talks and reacts to everyone, from his family to his friends, to golf officials to media and for his fans I have a newly found hero.  Pound for pound he may not have the same level of talent that Tiger Woods had, he doesn’t have the same will power Tiger has to practice day in and day out to be the greatest, but boy I like the human aspect of him.  When Rory came into the media room on Sunday, it was a breath of fresh air. He loves winning and playing well but was the first to admit that sometimes golf can be a drag and that there are other things that he enjoys in life, other than winning golf tournaments.  Rory gave us that human element of winning instead of the Robotic element that we got from Woods.

I am one media person that has bee too hard on Rory.  I know the type of talent he has and know that he can win many more majors.  So it frustrates me when I see him having the seasons that he had in 2013 and think he is wasting his talent chasing girls and acting like most 25 year-olds do.  This is a flawed way of thinking; the reality is there aren’t many robotic humans like Tiger, who thinks of nothing but playing golf everyday and winning.  So I guess we have to give Rory a pass during these times he doesn’t play well.   I also think that between him, Adam Scott, Martin Kaymer and Henrik Stenson they are the best golf has to offer right now, and they are really fun to watch.  With Sergio Garcia and Justin Rose also playing well, it doesn’t bode very well for our American Ryder Cup team which only seems to have Jimmy Walker, Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth as our top players.

I also have some thoughts on Sergio Garcia, who got his tenth top-ten major finish in 64 starts.  We have seen a lot of players like Colin Montgomerie, Jay Haas, Doug Sanders and Lee Westwood that have played well on their respected tours, but never seem to have gotten that one win in a major.  For Garcia, last week is another tough blow, shooting a final round 66 but seeing someone else get the trophy instead of him.  In some ways many think of Garcia like Montgomerie and Westwood, who went past their prime and faded away.  What we have to remember, Garcia is just 34 years old, the same age that Ben Hogan won the first of his nine major victories.  The only difference is that Hogan was very hunger will he was in his 30s and worked very hard on this game.  Garcia is a zillionaire who at times seems to have a big chip on his shoulder.  I will never forget the frustration the late Dave Marr had over Ben Crenshaw never winning a major and when Dave just about gave up, Ben won the 1984 Masters.  I still think that Sergio has a major him in but again he just isn’t in the right place at the right time.  He came close on Sunday, but it was a tall order for him to beat McIlroy who just about won the tournament on Saturday night when he eagled two of the last three holes.

As for the majors they have been very interesting this year and a bit of trivia.  We haven’t seen a list of four major winners in a year that didn’t have a rookie winner since 2000 when Vijay Singh and Tiger Woods won the four majors with previous wins under their belt.  So we can say that this year has been a very good year of majors, and I am looking forward to the PGA Championship.

Onwards to the RBC Canadian Open:

Sorry to say the field isn’t the best, but with all of the great tournaments this time of year, it’s hard press to have a great field week in and week out.  One thing is that the Canadian Open does have a great sponsor in RBC who have gotten a lot of great players to come.  Gosh, I just wish that something could be done to spread some of these problems with other tournaments, I guess next year the Quicken Loans will get this slot, hopefully the Canadian Open gets a break from being in between the British and the WGC-Bridgestone, then the PGA Championship.

Tournament information:

The Canadian Open has deep roots. Founded in 1904, it is the second oldest non-major tournament, save for the BMW Championship, formerly known as the Western Open. The original format was 36 holes over two days. John H. Oke won the inaugural tournament at the Royal Canadian Golf Club in Dixie, Quebec. Three years after the tournament’s inception, the event switched to its current format, 72 holes over four days.

The fledgling tournament was hosted annually through 1914 before being postponed from 1915 to 1918 due to World War I. When the event was re-instituted in 1919, it was never to be halted for reasons other than weather again. During World War II, its value as a national open skyrocketed as it, along with the British and U.S., were three of the only golf tournaments played during that era. The conclusion to World War II took some of the luster from the event.

Today, with the Canadian Open not being as prestigious as other national opens, it provides a great place for American golfers to seek a country’s championship. Seeing that it is the easiest to qualify for and typically has a lower quality field than other similar events, the Canadian Open affords those not likely to win a major championship the opportunity to still capture a national open.

Though the field can be underwhelming at times, the Canadian Open has been the site of many notable achievements. Arnold Palmer captured his first PGA Tour win at the 1955 Open. Lee Trevino’s 1971 victory capped off his amazing run at three national open victories in a month. Tiger Woods, in 2000, became the only other player to accomplish this feat, winning the U.S., then the British, followed by the Canadian.

Now we tend to forget that this is the national open of Canada but it’s been a while since a Canadian has one it, you have to go back to 1954 when Pat Fletcher won it.  Mike Weir came close to winning in 2004, only to give up a lead on the final holes and then lose a playoff to Vijay Singh.  Other than that it’s been a bit bare as Dave Barr finished T-4th in 1988, while David Morland IV finished T-5th in 2001, Weir was T-5th in 2008 and Richard Zokol was T-5th in 1984.  There will be 19 Canadians in the field and in past years Mike Weir has been the favorite. But with his game not in the best of shape, look for others to do better like Graham Delaet, David Hearn or Brad Fritsch.  Some of the other Canadians in the field are: Adam Hadwin, Stephen Ames, Beon-Yeong Lee, Dave Levesque, Eugene Wong, Billy Walsh, Ben Silverman and Kevin Stinson.  On top of these professionals, there are five Canadians that are amateurs, Taylor Pendrith, Corey Conners, Adam Svensson, Chris Hemmerich and Kevin Carrigan.

Course information:

  • Royal Montreal Golf Club (Blue Course)
  • Ile-Bizard, Quebec, Canada
  • 7,153 yards     Par 35-35–70
  • Royal Montreal G.C. was founded in 1873 and was the first club in North America whose members played golf.  The course that is holding this year’s Canadian Open is the Blue Course at Royal Montreal and was orginally designed by Dick Wilson and opened in 1959.  The course is a par 70 with only two par fives.
  • In 2004, Rees Jones was retained to remodel the Blue Course. Jones reconfigured two holes on the back nine and added nearly 300 yards to the layout, which now measures 7,153 yards. The largest single increment is the 50 yards added to the 3rd hole, which now plays 437 yards.
  • But adding distance was just one factor. Jones has redone all but one of the greensites—only the 16th green was left largely as is. He added contour to the putting surfaces while working on the greenside bunkers to make them both more demanding and authentic to Wilson’s original shapes.
  • Now water comes in play on six of the holes, 10, 14 through 18.  There are 89 sand traps throughout the course which is bentgrass, with thick Kentucky bluegrass rough. This creates a really hard course, in 2001 the Royal Montreal Blue course played to an average of 70.652 making it the 8th hardest course on the PGA Tour that year.   The course has a 76.2 rating from the back tees with a slope of 140.
  • Royal Montreal held the first Canadian Open in 1904 but that was on a different course.  Since the Blue Course was opened in 1959, it has held four Canadian Opens in 1975, 1980, 1997 and 2001.  It also held the Presidents Cup in 2007, the last time a professional event was held on it.
  • Its considered a shotmakers course so don’t look for players that rely on bully a course winning here.  The greens are very small with narrow entrances which means a premium on precise approach shots will be needed, no bumping and running it here.
  • So in looking for a champion its best to look at a proven player, one that plays well on major championship style courses and one which knows how to create shots.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the RBC Canadian Open:

Key historic stat of this week:

Not much is know of the course, most of the competitors are playing it for the first time this week. Only 17 players in this year’s field played it in 2001, with of all players John Daly doing the best finishing T-4th.  Frankly he isn’t going to be your top pick this week.  Of the others, K.J. Choi and Robert Allenby were T-8th, J.J. Henry and Dicky Price were T-14th while Luke Donald and Brian Gay were T-18th.  Stuart Appleby was T-23rd, Mike Weird was T-34th, Justin Leonard was T-55th with Heath Slocum 70th and Geoff Ogilvy 74th.  Missing the cut was Vijay Singh, Matt Kuchar, Bryce Molder, Woody Austin and Stephen Ames.  So you aren’t going to think any of these guys will be in your top picks for this year.

In looking back at the stats from 2001, Scott Verplank who won was T-2nd in driving accuracy so that has to be a key.  In looking at the course stats for that year the field average was hitting 55.12 of the fairways making it the second hardest course to hit fairways that year.  The same in 1997, the field average hitting 55.37% of the fairways making it the hardest driving course of the year.

So if history has a say, you will have to drive the ball straight this week

Key stat for the winner:

  • So the key in all of this could be driving it straight and long.  So it’s best to look at one key stat on the PGA Tour list and that is Total Driving that takes into account not only being accurate but long.  You may find your winner in the top-20 of this stat.
  • Greens are contoured and well bunkered which means that those that scramble will do very well.
  • With the course having only two par 5s birdies will be hard to come by and par will be king.  In 2001 5,309 pars were made at Royal Montreal the most of any top-20 course on the PGA Tour schedule that year (only four other courses had more), look for more of that this year.
  • In 1975 Tom Weiskopf shot 6 under, in 1980 Bob Gilder was 6 under, in 1997 Steve Jones was 5 under while Scott Verplank was 14 under.  I see the scoring being low again and I don’t see anyone being in double digits like Verplank was.
  • Weather has been delightful most of the summer in Montreal and look for more of the same with temperatures in the high 70s with very little chance of rain, that is until Sunday when it’s predicted to be 40% chance of rain.
  • One last thing, wouldn’t it be great to see Hunter Mahan win this week.  Remember he was the 36 hole leader last year when he was getting ready for the third round when news came on the driving range that his wife Kandi was going into labor in Dallas with the couple’s first child.  He looked into various charter and commercial flight options and learned of a private plane that was headed to Dallas in just a few hours. He made it home early that evening and was able to be with his wife for the birth of Zoe Olivia in the wee hours of the next morning.  If it wasn’t enough for Mahan to go to his wives side, possibly costing him over a million dollars in the first place check, Mahan elected to skip the next week’s WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, a tournament he won in 2010, to spend time at home with his wife and baby.  So if there is a golfing god he may give Hunter a big helping hand in this week’s Canadian Open.

 

Who to watch for at the RBC Canadian Open

Best Bets:

Jim Furyk

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T9 CUT T34 T14 Win Win

What a perfect course for him, loves to drive it straight and does have a bit of length. He was 4th at the British Open so think of him as the big favorite at Royal Montreal.

Hunter Mahan

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
WD T48 T34 T17 T5 T60 T24 T4 T42

Has to be everyone’s choice after what happened last year. Hasn’t had the best last four months but you have to think he is charged up and ready to pick up where he left off last year, on the driving range on Saturday afternoon. One thing that will help him, he is T-7th on the total driving stat for the year, so maybe this will be his best shot at winning this event.

Dustin Johnson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T2 WD

Played well at Hoylake, his problem was not doing well on the Par 5s. That won’t be a problem since there are only two par 5s at Royal Montreal

Best of the rest:

Graham DeLaet

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T56 CUT T46 CUT

Could this be the year of a Canuck winner? He is 5th in total driving for the year and this could be the perfect place for him to find his game.

Graeme McDowell

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
74 T46

Was T-9th at the British Open, plays well on tight courses.

Charl Schwartzel

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T28 T42 T9

Another of those players that has lot’s of experience and can play tight courses. Was T-7th at Hoylake so is playing well right now.

Luke Donald

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T17 3 T24 T46

He has had some close calls this year at Valspar, Heritage and BMW PGA, is a very experience player in courses like Royal Montreal so stick him on the short list of players that could do well.

Solid contenders

David Hearn

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T44 T71 T34 CUT T58 T58 T20 CUT CUT CUT CUT

Another Canadian that can do well in this event. Has made cuts in 2014 but hasn’t had a top-ten since the Players Championship.

Matt Kuchar

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T2 T34 CUT T4 CUT T14

Was runner-up last year, plays well on courses like this. Has struggled a bit in the last two months but on this course he can be very good.

Brandt Snedeker

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
Win T34 CUT T5 T7

Was in the right place at the right time last year to win this. Can he do it twice in a row is the big question, but again has the experience to do well at Royal Montreal.

Vijay Singh

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T31 T7 2 T35 T7 Win T6 T6

Still think he has that one shinning moment left in him, this is a perfect course for him. Many may not know this but did finish T-5th two weeks ago in the Senior Open so maybe that can rub off on him this week.

Long shots that could come through:

K.J. Choi

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T4

Has missed his last two cuts, but remember he finished T-2nd at the Travelers just a month ago and was in the top-ten at Royal Montreal in 2001.

William McGirt

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T2 T2 T59

Has been runner-up the last two years, hasn’t played that bad in 2014.

Mike Weir

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T49 CUT WD CUT T24 T5 T34 CUT CUT 2 10 T22

You have to always root for him at this event, odds are real long on him winning but it would be nice to see him play well.

Speak Your Mind