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BlogPGA Championship Preview and Picks

PGA Championship

August 7 – 10, 2014

Valhalla Golf Club

Louisville, Ky.

Par: 71 / Yardage: 7,458

Purse: $10 million

with $1.8 million to the winner

Defending Champion:
Jason Dufner

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

As of this minute when I write this on Monday morning the field includes 109 of the top 110 in the latest Official World Rankings, with Dustin Johnson the only player not in the field as he battles his personal problems.  If that holds up this would be the best field of the year and second best behind last year’s PGA Championship.  Interesting to note that no event has ever had a perfect 100 of 100 off the world ranking attend.  Last year the PGA Championship had 99 of the 100.  Oh, what we really need to look at is the health of Tiger Woods, Jason Dufner and Jason Day.  All three are ailing and could pull out of the PGA before Thursday morning.

The field includes 24 of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2014 are in the field, right now the only one missing is Dustin Johnson.

The field includes 24 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list, right now the only one missing is Dustin Johnson.

The field includes a 32 players that have won 38 events on the PGA Tour this year: Jimmy Walker (Frys.com Open, Sony Open in Hawaii & AT&T Pebble), Webb Simpson (Shriners Hospitals); Ryan Moore (CIMB CLassic); Chris Kirk (McGladrey Classic), Harris English (OHL Classic at Mayakoba); Zach Johnson (Hyundai T of C); Chesson Hadley (Puerto Rico); Patrick Reed (Humana & Cadillac); Scott Stallings (Farmers); Kevin Stadler (WM Phoenix); Bubba Watson (Northern Trust & Masters); Jason Day (WGC-Accenture); Russell Henley (Honda); John Senden (Valspar Championship); Matt Every (Palmer); Steve Bowditch (Valero Texas); Matt Jones (Shell Houston); Matt Kuchar (RBC Heritage); Seung-Yul Noh (Zurich); J.B. Holmes (Wells Fargo) Martin Kaymer (Players & U.S. Open); Ben Crane (FedEx St. Jude); Brendon Todd (Byron Nelson); Adam Scott (Colonial); Hideki Matsuyama (Memorial); Kevin Streelman (Travelers); Justin Rose (Quicken Loans National); Angel Cabrera (Greenbrier); Brian Harman (John Deere); Rory McIlroy (Open Championship & Bridgestone), Tim Clark (RBC Canadian Open) and Geoff Ogilvy (Barracuda).

The only one not in the field is Dustin Johnson (WGC-HSBC Champions).

The field includes 13 past champions: Jason Dufner (2013), Rory McIlroy (2012), Keegan Bradley (2011), Martin Kaymer (2010), Y.E. Yang (2009), Padraig Harrington (2008), Tiger Woods (2007, ’06, ’00 & 1999),  Phil Mickelson (2005), Vijay Singh (2004 & 1998), Shaun Micheel (2003), Rick Beem (2002), David Toms (2001), Davis Love III (1997), Mark Brooks (1996) and John Daly (1991).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the PGA Championship field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the PGA Championship field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the PGA Championship  field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Check back with us on Wednesday as we will update this preview, since there are so many things up in the air due to withdraws and weather problems.  I will be on site and be able to access things better than on Monday.

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the PGA Championship

Player WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. RBC Canadian Russian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier Classic French Open Quicken Loans BMW Inter. Travelers Champ. Irish Open
Rory McIlroy
(482.67 pts)
Win
(198)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(264)
DNP T14
(24)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Sergio Garcia
(408.67 pts)
2
(150)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(200)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(25.33)
T2
(33.33)
DNP
Justin Rose
(350 pts)
T4
(120)
DNP DNP DNP T23
(54)
DNP Win
(88)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP DNP DNP
Graeme McDowell
(318 pts)
T8
(75)
DNP T9
(45)
DNP T9
(90)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP DNP DNP T6
(20)
Marc Leishman
(314.67 pts)
3
(135)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(140)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T8
(33.33)
DNP T11
(13)
DNP
Jim Furyk
(312.5 pts)
T15
(52.5)
DNP 2
(100)
DNP 4
(160)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Rickie Fowler
(308.33 pts)
T8
(75)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(200)
DNP T8
(33.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Charl Schwartzel
(237 pts)
T4
(120)
DNP T43
(7)
DNP T7
(110)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Keegan Bradley
(235 pts)
T4
(120)
DNP DNP DNP T19
(62)
DNP DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T31
(6.33)
DNP
Adam Scott
(215 pts)
T8
(75)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(140)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ryan Moore
(211 pts)
T8
(75)
DNP DNP DNP T12
(76)
T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T5
(23.33)
DNP
Angel Cabrera
(208.83 pts)
T31
(28.5)
DNP DNP DNP T19
(62)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP T24
(17.33)
DNP T11
(13)
DNP
Robert Karlsson
(183.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(76)
DNP T8
(33.33)
DNP 4
(53.33)
DNP T22
(18.67)
DNP T44
(2)
Tim Clark
(170.17 pts)
T50
(1.5)
DNP Win
(132)
DNP DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Fabrizio Zanotti
(166 pts)
T26
(36)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T59
(0)
DNP T9
(30)
DNP Win
(88)
DNP T14
(12)
Shane Lowry
(165.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T9
(90)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP DNP DNP T12
(25.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Stephen Gallacher
(145.83 pts)
T47
(4.5)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(70)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Thomas Bjorn
(144.5 pts)
T15
(52.5)
DNP DNP DNP T26
(48)
DNP T24
(17.33)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T8
(33.33)
DNP DNP
Matt Kuchar
(143.33 pts)
T12
(57)
DNP T4
(80)
DNP T54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T31
(6.33)
DNP
Edoardo Molinari
(140 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T7
(110)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T35
(10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP 2
(33.33)
Patrick Reed
(138.67 pts)
T4
(120)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T26
(16)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Thongchai Jaidee
(136.67 pts)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T39
(22)
DNP T48
(1.33)
DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP
Henrik Stenson
(135.17 pts)
T19
(46.5)
DNP DNP DNP T39
(22)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP DNP
Francesco Molinari
(133.17 pts)
T31
(28.5)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(70)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T26
(16)
DNP T12
(25.33)
DNP DNP
Phil Mickelson
(132.5 pts)
T15
(52.5)
DNP DNP DNP T23
(54)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the PGA Championship

Player WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. RBC Canadian Russian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier Classic French Open Quicken Loans BMW Inter. Travelers Champ. Irish Open
Y.E. Yang
(-51.67 pts)
DNP DQ
(-5)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
John Daly
(-40 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T79
(0)
DNP DNP T66
(0)
T57
(0)
DNP
Chesson Hadley
(-36.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Anirban Lahiri
(-26.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
Richard Sterne
(-26.67 pts)
T58
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Boo Weekley
(-26.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ian Poulter
(-26.67 pts)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Pat Perez
(-23.33 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T75
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Ryo Ishikawa
(-23.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Kiradech Aphibarnrat
(-22 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

A couple of important elements have come up in just a weeks time.  It’s what is happening to Tiger Woods, Dustin Johnson, Jason Day and Jason Dufner.  Let’s take it one at a time:

Tiger

As I write this on Monday morning, everything is up in the air for Tiger.  With Tiger hurting something in his lower back on a shot at the second hole on Sunday, it runs the full gambit on what is the future for Tiger.  We know nothing; the injury could have been career ending for all we know, or it could have been a simple tweak of the back that can be fixed with special treatments.  Of course it looked terrible, Tiger could hardly stand or walk and looked in terrible pain on Sunday at Firestone.  But let me put this thought in your mind, back in 2012 Tiger hurt himself in the final round at the WGC-Cadillac.  It looked terrible, Tiger could hardly walk, and it looked very serious.  Guess what happened, ten days later he looked perfect when he showed up at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and won the tournament.  So we have to forget what we saw on Sunday at Firestone, it could be something that is easy.

Now on the other end of the spectrum, Tiger has been under a lot of pressure to get his game back so that he can play on the Ryder Cup team.  Sorry, I think that the boat has left the station after some of the shots that Tiger showed on Sunday.  The way Captain Tom Watson was talking on Monday morning on XM radio, he sounded like he has made his decision and won’t have Tiger on the team.  We can’t say or write anything about this because we don’t know how serious this his.  I personally would have liked to see Tiger take his time, figure out a way to get his game back to the level it was at this time last year and came out strong at his tournament in December.  One thing that is becoming more know it’s not with Tiger’s swing that is causing the problems, it’s the way he is thinking on the course.  The winning mojo is just not there and who knows if he can ever regain it.

Sad story on the same realm, at the end of the 1930s Ralph Guldahl was the best golfer in the world.  He won the Masters and U.S. Open and was the dominating force in 1938, ’39.  But one day a strange thing happened to Guldahl, he went to see a movie and before the movie they had newsreel shows, giving the news of the week.  In the movie that he attended they had a story on Guldahl winning and they did a slow-mo swing of his.  It’s was the first time Guldahl had seen his swing in slow-mo, and he didn’t like it.  He tried to alter the swing and in a matter of weeks got into a terrible tail-spin in which he wasn’t able to get out of and went from the best player in the world to the worst, just because he thought that his swing wasn’t right.  The same with Tiger, I think that his mind is not helping him and he isn’t thinking the same way that he uses to that is his #1 problem.

Dustin Johnson:

This is a sad story for not only Dustin but golf.  On Thursday, Johnson announced that he was going to take some time off to work out some personal problems.  He would not play in the PGA Championship and the Ryder Cup, but he never said how long he would be out and what the personal problems was.  On Friday, Golf.com came out with an article that said that the Johnson had failed his third drug test and was suspended by the tour.  In a matter of hours, the Tour fired back that they didn’t suspend Johnson and that this was a private matter.

In this day and age of quick news fueled by sites like TMZ and such, when is the PGA Tour going to learn that they have to be upfront and the ones that report the news.  Baseball, Football and Basketball are the ones that report any disciplinary action on any of their players.  Yes, it’s a bombshell for about a day and then goes away.  But by the PGA Tour’s action of hiding things so that they don’t look bad to sponsors, it fuels the news cycle to a feverish pace.  Just look at how long the Tiger Woods scandal was in 2009 and ’10.  If he was just upfront with people and said, he needed privacy things would have been better instead of news organizations having to find out the dirt and reporting about it.

In the case of Johnson, I am pretty sure that he uses marijuana, which in the real world is not that big of a deal, but for athletes it’s a no-no.  Making matters worst, the stories are past drug use but looking at all of Johnson’s life, and we have the accusations that Dustin had affairs with other players wives.  Sorry, this has gone too far but you have to blame the PGA Tour for not being in front of the story, taking the whack and moving on.

What I think happen and again this is my personal thoughts, nothing that is factual.  I believe it’s true that Johnson has failed multiple drug tests on tour and in this case they went to Johnson and gave him a choice, suspension or seeking help.  I think Johnson and his advisers figured out that seeking professional help for his problems were the best course of action, and the Tour took no action on him.  The lesson to be learned on this, you can’t hide anything from the media, they are going to find it out.  The hardcore golf media (not many of us left) really don’t want to see a story like this go viral in which outside “gossip” sites get involved.  Most of use in the golf media figured that Dustin was “probably” disciplined by the tour for drug use a couple of years ago.  We want to report about golf, not what kind of “kinky” lifestyle a golfer wants to lead.  So for the good folks at Ponte Vedre, come on be upfront on bad things, these guys are humans and do mess up.

Jason Dufner and Jason Day:

At the Bridgestone defending PGA Champion Jason Dufner revealed he has two painful bulging discs in his neck, and it’s been bothering him since the Masters.  Right now he is trying to get over it with steroid injections and says that surgery has not been discussed.  But the fact is that he isn’t 100% and shouldn’t be thought as a favorite, I wouldn’t even bet a dime on him making the cut.

As for Jason Day, it’s been a long year.  He did win the WGC-Accenture match Play championship, but he has had problems with strep throat, tonsillitis, a problem with his left thumb and wrist problems but now he is fighting a bout with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo or BPPV.  Doctors feel that the problem was caused by his need of cortisone for his thumb and anti-inflammatory drugs for his throat problem.  So he withdrew after the third round of the WGC-Bridgestone and has been told to rest for at least 48 hours.  So he may also play in the PGA Championship but I can’t make him a pick, at best think he will be lucky just to make the cut.

Tournament information:

This is the 96th PGA Championship. The plans for the PGA Championship were created on January 16, 1916 at a meeting of a group of PGA Tour professionals including Walter Hagen. Their vision was to create a national championship that would rival the U.S. Open in terms of importance. Just months later, their vision came to reality as the first PGA Championship Match Play event was played at Siwanoy Country Club in Bronxville, NY that year. Englishman Jim Barnes took home the inaugural crown.

After the inaugural tournament, the event took a two-year break from 1917 to 1918 because of World War I. The break in action didn’t phase Jim Barnes, as he went on to win the PGA Championship in its return to the Tour in 1919. Since the two-year hiatus, The PGA Championship has only seen one other break, that being in 1943 due to World War II. The biggest change in the event’s history occurred in 1958, when the format of the event was changed from Match Play to 72-hole stroke play.

The famed Wanamaker trophy, awarded to the winner of the PGA Championship, can trace its routes back to the beginning of golf equipment. In the early part of the 20th Century, A.G. Spalding & Bros. was the predominant maker of golf equipment; however, Rodman Wanamaker sought to create a company that would rival Spalding in the golf industry. Though his plan ultimately failed, his dream will always me remembered as he was the one that first sponsored the PGA Championship and the trophy, which today bears his name.

Course information:

  • Valhalla Golf Club
  • Louisville, Ky.
  • 7,458 yards     Par 35-36–71

We have all heard about new courses that many claims are magical wonders, but the true test of a course is when the tournament is held, especially when a major championship is played on it.  In 1996 the PGA of America took a gamble on the course just outside of Louisville, Kentucky.  Now politics has a lot to do with holding three PGA Championships and a Ryder Cup in a span of 18 years, but many say the course is great for a major championship.

Valhalla lies on land that makes up two very different nines.  The front is on flat meadowland with a river running through several of the holes.  Even though, its not considered a “links design” several of the holes have that look.  The back nine is totally different, played on the side of a hill with the fairways guarded by tall hardwood trees.

Now many think that the reasons the course is chosen as the site of a PGA Championship is because of how tough the course is, great shot value, tradition and the promise that the venue will produce a first-class tournament with a worthy champion.  In most cases, thats true and Valhalla has provided some of that.  But lets face facts, the real reason Valhalla has been chosen to hold not only three PGA Championships in a span of 18 years and the 2008 Ryder Cup is all money and politics.

Politics because the course is mostly owned by the PGA of America.  The money part is two fold; first a site fee isn’t that big of a deal on a course owned by the PGA of America and two because golf-starved Kentuckians will sell the place out.

Now here is an interesting stat.  Jack Nicklaus has been a very popular golf course architect with a dozen of his courses holding PGA Tour events since 2000.  But in major championships only two Nicklaus courses have been venues, here at Valhalla and Shoal Creek.

As a course Valhalla is pretty good with 18 very distinct type of holes.  There isn’t a weak hole among them with a couple of them proving to be quite special.  The hardest hole back in ’96 and 2000 was the 12th, a dogleg right that plays 467 yard with most of the trouble coming from the tee shot.  Miss the fairway and you have no shot to the green as proven back in in the two previous years when more bogeys and double bogeys were scored on this hole than any other.  Another tough hole was the par 5 seventh, in a day when most par 5s are pushovers, the seventh proved otherwise.  Even though it played under par its average was 4.94 in 1996 and 4.73 in 2000 made it one of the hardest par 5s on tour.

In 2012 Jack Nicklaus was brought in to make some changes to the course for this year’s PGA Championship.  All 18 greens were redone, all of the bunkers were altered and cleaned up and major alterations were made to hole 2, 3, 7, 9, 14 and 15.  One of the biggest changes was changing the second hole from a par 5 to a par 4.  Even with par being lowered, 291 yards have been added since 2000.

One hole they left alone was the par 5, 18th.  The hole has a lot of drama to it, a medium length par 5 at 542 yards that most of the field can get home in two on. But it has water on it and in front of the green, so a lot can happen on the hole to add excitement.

In the two PGA’s and Ryder Cup the course has received high praise from the players, and I can see that happening this year also.

  • In 1996 the course played to a 72.636 average (half a shot over par), making it the 15th hardest course on the PGA Tour.
  • In 2000 the course played to a 72.971 average (just about a shot over par) making it the 9th hardest course on tour that year.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the PGA Championship:

Key stat of the week:

It’s really sad but the big thing of the week could be poor weather.  Just look at the long range forecast and you can see that each day will be very hot and humid.  I can tell you that combination in Louisville will make for an uncomfortable day for the players.  But the really bad part, rain and thunder are predicted every day except for Sunday, so this could be a rough week.

Here are some more key stats to look to for this week:

  • Important to see who is the best total driver of the ball going into the week and then checking to see who hits the most greens on the PGA Tour.
  • Funny that the one player that is in the top-three in both stats is Graham Delaet so the thought is that he should be the favorite.  Now that theory could work, Shaun Micheel was in the same boat in 2003 and won, but these are different times.  As good as Delaet hits the ball he is a very average putter, but still if you are looking for a dark horse it could be him.  Also high on the list is Adam Scott and Sergio Garcia, two players that are playing great this summer.
  • In looking at the stats of the winners in 1996, Mark Brooks tee to green stats weren’t very impressive but he led the field in putting stats.  Since he was T-63rd in scrambling that means that he really putted well.
  • In 2000 Tiger was very impressive leading not only the driving distance stat but also greens in regulation and birdie average.  Overall he was 1st in total driving, 1st in ball striking and 2nd in all-around and T4th in Scrambling.  Of course with those good stats his putting stats were in the middle of the field, so in his case it showed that you had to hit the ball good to win.
  • Need for patience.  This is one of those courses that par is your friend, so don’t look for low scoring.
  • Does a non-marquee guy have a chance this week?  Could Thongchai Jaidee, Yoshitaka Takeya or even Jonas Bilxt win?  Not a chance, look for either one of the usual suspects or someone like a Sergio Garcia, Rickie Fowler or Jim Furyk who really wants to do well in a big event.  As for an underdog, maybe the PGA Championship has been loaded with them beginning with John Daly and ending with guys like Rich Beem and Shaun Micheel.

 

Who to watch for at the PGA Championship

Best Bets:

Adam Scott

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T5 T11 7 T39 CUT CUT T12 T3 T40 T9 T23 T23

Just think he has played so good this summer and gotten nothing out of his game. He is a very good player in poor weather and I think he will handle the heat and humidity the best.

Sergio Garcia

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T61 CUT T12 CUT CUT T2 WD T3 T23 CUT CUT T10

You would have to think that he can at least back into one of these majors and win? He is due for a victory, course is good for him.

Rory McIlroy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T8 Win T64 T3 T3

He has the eye of the Tiger, we haven’t seen this week to week intensity since Tiger nine years ago. Many will think that winning the Open three weeks ago and Bridgestone last week will be bad for Rory, it’s making him stronger.

Best of the rest:

Justin Rose

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T33 T3 CUT CUT CUT T9 T12 T41 CUT CUT T23

He too is playing well and I can see some good things out of him. He was fourth at Bridgestone, something that was forgotten.

Jim Furyk

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
2 T42 T39 T24 T63 T29 CUT T29 T34 CUT T18 9

He also is having a great summer and just like Sergio is due to walk into a win. He just has that one problem of closing the deal, again only a matter of time when he wins by default.

Keegan Bradley

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T19 T3 Win

Watch him, his game is sharp, he has played well of last including a T-4th at Bridgestone.

Marc Leishman

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T12 T27 T48

3rd at Bridgestone, T5th at the British and T-8th at Quicken all on good courses tells me that he could do the deed this week

Solid contenders

Rickie Fowler

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T19 CUT T51 T58

Has played the most consistent of anyone in majors and WGC events. This is a course he can shine on so don’t be surprised at a good week for him.

Phil Mickelson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T72 T36 T19 T12 73 T7 T32 T16 Win T6 T23 T34

Showed some life with a final round 62 at Bridgestone, look for that to carry over to this week.

Graeme McDowell

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T12 T11 CUT CUT T10 T15 T37 CUT CUT

Another playing well, only thing I worry about is his pregnant wife is very close.

Henrik Stenson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
3 CUT T6 T4 CUT T14 T47

He can play well just about anyplace, so look for a good week out of him.

Bubba Watson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T11 T26 2 CUT 70 CUT

This course favors the right to left player like Bubba, so he could surprise us.

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
First time playing in this event

Long shots that could come through:

J.B. Holmes

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
WD T24 WD T29 T37

Would love to win in his home state, also plays well at Valhalla.

Patrick Reed

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
First time playing in this event

Watch him, played well at Bridgestone so his game could be back.

Lee Westwood

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T33 CUT T8 T3 CUT T32 T29 T17 CUT CUT CUT

Has been terrible all year, but he needs to play well for a Ryder Cup berth and did so with a final round 63 at Bridgestone.

Worst Bets:

Tiger Woods

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T40 T11 CUT T28 2 Win Win T4 T24 T39 2

Good be a moot point if his withdraws, but even if he plays will be hard press to make the cut.

Jason Day

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T8 CUT CUT T10

Too many physician problems to deal with.

Jason Dufner

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
Win T27 2 T5 CUT

Hard enough to be defending champion, to add problems with two bulging disks makes it impossible.

Comments

  1. Absolutely love your site i think your info and detail is a credit to you. I’m glad to be a subscriber and i think it is the best site around. Hope your hard work is rewarded.
    Gary

  2. Bubba causing controversy today for no reason. PGA sets up a longest drive competition on #10 for the fans at the last major of the year and he hits a 3-iron off the tee? He WAS on my shortlist for my season long golf pool (can only pick 2 players that I haven’t used yet thia season in other tourneys); but I have since scratched him off after watching his press conference. Going to need to narrow this down before Thursday morning but as of now I’m looking at:
    1. Marc Leishman
    2. Martin Kaymer
    3. Phil Mickelson
    4. J.B. Holmes

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