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BlogDeutsche Bank Preview and Picks

Deutsche Bank Championship

August 29 – September 1, 2014

TPC of Boston

Norton, Mass.

Par: 71 / Yardage: 7,216

Purse: $8 million

with $1,440,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Henrik Stenson

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 32 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with eight top-ten players in the field (No Sergio Garcia & Justin Rose): #1 Rory McIlroy, #2 Adam Scott, #3 Henrik Stenson, #6 Jim Furyk,#7 Jason Day  #8 Matt Kuchar, #9 Bubba Watson, and #10 Phil Mickelson.  From 11 to 25 there are 10 of the 15 with #11 Rickie Fowler,  #13 Jordan Spieth, #14 Martin Kaymer, #15 Zach Johnson,  #18 Hideki Matsuyama, #19 Hunter Mahan, #20 Jimmy Walker, #21 Charl Schwartzel, #24 Keegan Bradley and #25 Patrick Reed. Between 26 and 50 there are 18 of the 25, they are #29 Luke Donald.  #30 Bill Haas, #32 Webb Simpson, #33 Kevin Na, #35 Ian Poulter, #36 Brandt Snedeker, #39 Ryan Moore, #40 Graham DeLaet, #41 Marc Leishman, #42 Brendon Todd, #43 Kevin Streelman, #45 Chris Kirk, #47 Ernie Els and #48 Gary Woodland.

Last year there was 40 players from the top-50 so eight less this year.

The field includes 94 players from the top-100 on the FedEx Cup rankings.

The field includes all 25 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list. 

The field includes 7 of the 10 different past champions: Henrik Stenson (2013), Rory McIlroy (2012), Webb Simpson (2011), Charley Hoffman (2010), Vijay Singh (2008, ’04), Phil Mickelson (2007) and Adam Scott (2003).

The field includes a 33 players that have won 41 events on the PGA Tour this year: Jimmy Walker (Frys.com Open, Sony Open in Hawaii & AT&T Pebble), Webb Simpson (Shriners Hospitals); Ryan Moore (CIMB CLassic); Chris Kirk (McGladrey Classic), Harris English (OHL Classic at Mayakoba); Zach Johnson (Hyundai T of C); Chesson Hadley (Puerto Rico); Patrick Reed (Humana & Cadillac); Scott Stallings (Farmers); Kevin Stadler (WM Phoenix); Bubba Watson (Northern Trust & Masters); Jason Day (WGC-Accenture); Russell Henley (Honda); John Senden (Valspar Championship); Matt Every (Palmer); Steve Bowditch (Valero Texas); Matt Jones (Shell Houston); Matt Kuchar (RBC Heritage); Seung-Yul Noh (Zurich); J.B. Holmes (Wells Fargo) Martin Kaymer (Players & U.S. Open); Ben Crane (FedEx St. Jude); Brendon Todd (Byron Nelson); Adam Scott (Colonial); Hideki Matsuyama (Memorial); Kevin Streelman (Travelers);  Angel Cabrera (Greenbrier); Brian Harman (John Deere); Rory McIlroy (Open Championship, Bridgestone & PGA Championship), Tim Clark (RBC Canadian Open), Geoff Ogilvy (Barracuda), Camilo Villegas (Wyndham) and Hunter Mahan (The Barclays).

The only ones not in the field is Dustin Johnson (WGC-HSBC Champions) & Justin Rose (Quicken Loans National);.

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the Deutsche Bank field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the Deutsche Bank field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the Deutsche Bank  field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

 

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the Deutsche Bank Championship

Player The Barclays Wyndham Champ. PGA Champ. WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Canadian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier Classic French Open Quicken Loans BMW Intern.
Rory McIlroy
(626 pts)
T22
(42)
DNP Win
(264)
Win
(132)
DNP DNP Win
(176)
DNP T14
(12)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Rickie Fowler
(447.5 pts)
T9
(67.5)
DNP T3
(180)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T2
(133.33)
DNP T8
(16.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Jim Furyk
(423.33 pts)
8
(75)
DNP T5
(140)
T15
(35)
DNP 2
(66.67)
4
(106.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Hunter Mahan
(369 pts)
Win
(198)
DNP T7
(110)
T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T32
(24)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T24
(8.67)
DNP
Phil Mickelson
(284 pts)
78
(0)
DNP 2
(200)
T15
(35)
DNP DNP T23
(36)
DNP T11
(13)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Henrik Stenson
(277 pts)
T38
(18)
DNP T3
(180)
T19
(31)
DNP DNP T39
(14.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T2
(33.33)
Adam Scott
(265.83 pts)
T15
(52.5)
DNP T15
(70)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T5
(93.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Charl Schwartzel
(258 pts)
T30
(30)
DNP T15
(70)
T4
(80)
DNP T43
(4.67)
T7
(73.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ernie Els
(250.67 pts)
T5
(105)
T64
(0)
T7
(110)
T26
(24)
DNP T12
(25.33)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP T41
(3)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Bill Haas
(223.17 pts)
T15
(52.5)
T2
(100)
T27
(46)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP T23
(9)
DNP T30
(6.67)
DNP
Jason Day
(211.67 pts)
T2
(150)
DNP T15
(70)
WD
(-5)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Matt Kuchar
(196.33 pts)
T5
(105)
DNP DNP T12
(38)
DNP T4
(53.33)
T54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Brandt Snedeker
(193.33 pts)
CUT
(-15)
T5
(70)
T13
(74)
T12
(38)
DNP T25
(16.67)
T58
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T21
(9.67)
DNP
Marc Leishman
(189.67 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T46
(8)
3
(90)
DNP DNP T5
(93.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T8
(16.67)
DNP
Patrick Reed
(181.17 pts)
T9
(67.5)
T24
(26)
T58
(0)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T26
(8)
DNP T11
(13)
DNP
William McGirt
(177.33 pts)
T5
(105)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP DNP T25
(16.67)
DNP T23
(9)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Cameron Tringale
(160 pts)
T2
(150)
DNP DQ
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP T30
(6.67)
DNP
Jimmy Walker
(150.67 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T7
(110)
T26
(24)
DNP DNP T26
(32)
DNP T41
(3)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Stuart Appleby
(146.67 pts)
T2
(150)
T38
(12)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T46
(1.33)
DNP
Kevin Chappell
(146 pts)
T30
(30)
DNP T13
(74)
DNP T34
(10.67)
T20
(20)
DNP T52
(0)
DNP T16
(11.33)
DNP T55
(0)
DNP
Angel Cabrera
(145 pts)
T22
(42)
DNP WD
(-10)
T31
(19)
DNP DNP T19
(41.33)
DNP DNP Win
(44)
DNP T24
(8.67)
DNP
Ryan Palmer
(140 pts)
T74
(0)
DNP T5
(140)
DNP DNP DNP T58
(0)
DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP T55
(0)
DNP
Keegan Bradley
(124.67 pts)
T53
(0)
DNP CUT
(-20)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP T19
(41.33)
DNP DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Ryan Moore
(124 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T40
(20)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T12
(50.67)
T7
(18.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Camilo Villegas
(120 pts)
CUT
(-15)
Win
(132)
DNP DNP DNP WD
(-3.33)
DNP T45
(1.67)
DNP T26
(8)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the Deutsche Bank Championship

Player The Barclays Wyndham Champ. PGA Champ. WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Canadian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open Greenbrier Classic French Open Quicken Loans BMW Intern.
Scott Stallings
(-56.67 pts)
CUT
(-15)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-20)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T35
(5)
DNP T71
(0)
DNP
Chesson Hadley
(-50 pts)
70
(0)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Will MacKenzie
(-44 pts)
CUT
(-15)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T27
(7.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
K.J. Choi
(-36.67 pts)
T71
(0)
DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T66
(0)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T64
(0)
DNP
Ian Poulter
(-31.67 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T58
(0)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Harris English
(-29.33 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP CUT
(-20)
T31
(19)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T74
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Matt Every
(-28.33 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP CUT
(-20)
T47
(3)
DNP DNP 71
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T39
(3.67)
DNP
Martin Kaymer
(-25.67 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP CUT
(-20)
T56
(0)
DNP DNP 70
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T12
(12.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Pat Perez
(-20.33 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T46
(8)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T75
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Russell Henley
(-20 pts)
T61
(0)
DNP CUT
(-20)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T27
(7.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

So it’s the second leg of the FedEx Cup playoffs, and six exempt players are not participating.  For some like Dustin Johnson (rehab), Jason Dufner (injury), Graham McDowell (wife had a baby on Monday), Paul Casey (wife due this week), these are valid reason for not playing.  But what about Sergio Garcia and Justin Rose, both say they need some time off, which we all shake our heads.

One thing about the schedule, last year and next year there is an open week between the Deutsche Bank and the BMW Championship, this week its four straight weeks.  That’s because there is a week between the Ryder Cup and the Tour Championship.  So in a way it’s understandable, four weeks in a row is a grind.  Plus we had the British Open, WGC Bridgestone and the PGA Championship in a four-week grind with a week inbetween the FedEx playoffs.  So also counting the Ryder Cup that’s eight big events in a span of 11 weeks, yes that is too much.

Still the fact that players need time off is a bit crazy.  But with the way the FedEx Cup plays out, both Garcia (15th in rankings) and Rose (20th in rankings) will still have a good chance to make it to the Tour Championship and once there  have a chance to win the title, so for these two it makes sense.  Frankly that’s why my system that I talked about last week in having the playoffs spread across the year makes sense.

Anybody surprised by the spilt between Tiger and Sean?

From day one back in 2010, many asked what the shelf life of this Tiger Woods, Sean Foley partnership was.  In a way it was like the Mariah Carey/Nick Cannon marriage or any marriage between two of the games top stars in their field.  Both Butch Harmon and Hank Haney experienced the demands and the job, both realized that it was an impossible task.  I can only bet that Sean Foley realizes that today.  Other than maybe Jim Furyk with his relationship with his father who is his swing coach, there is no teacher that has just one client.  They take on others and frankly that just doesn’t work for Tiger.  He demands 24/7 devotion from a coach.  For Butch Harmon, he had Tiger in the early years when Tiger was willing to fly to Butch in Las Vegas to work with him.  But with Haney and Foley, they both had to go to Florida when Tiger needed them.  Tiger is also more demanding and that was the reason for his departure from Foley, Tiger never achieved the day to day consistency and win ratio that he had with Butch and Hank.  Was this Sean’s fault, yes and no.  But the methods that Sean had Tiger doing just never materialized into greatness.

I for one shake my head on the thought of Tiger needing a swing coach.  Yes, everyone needs a set of eyes to look at them from time to time.  20 years ago when having a swing “guru” became the norm on the PGA Tour I asked Jack Nicklaus his thoughts on this.  As he said he only worked with one true swing coach in his career, Jack Grout.  Nicklaus said he worked a lot with Grout since taking up the game as a kid and going on tour.  In the year before Nicklaus turned pro, Grout told Nicklaus that he had to “own his swing,” that he had to realize the bits and pieces of it and be able to diagnosed problems and know how to fix them because Grout wouldn’t be on Tour with Jack.  Of course, you can’t do that all the time, sometimes you get screwed up and Grout was always there for Nicklaus, but the older Nicklaus got, the less he needed Grout.

So in a way Tiger has never learned how to “own his swing,” a term in which a player can feel at ease with things.  What has always amazed me about Tiger, in his career he has gone through four different changes of his swing, once when Butch Harmon took over in 1993, another with Butch after his 1997 Masters win, again under Haney in 2004 and again under Foley in 2010.  With each change, it seem to grow harder for Tiger to grasp it, the one with Haney took about two years, and there were times early in 2005 that many question what Tiger was thinking.  We have all question what Tiger was doing with Foley, the only difference was that he was injured so many times that we all thought is was just a band-aid swing to get over the physical problems.

So now Tiger has a tough decision.  He will be 39 at the end of the year and if he goes with another “prominent” coach that requires another swing change, does he have the mental toughness to endure this?  I have had a lot of open talks with Butch Harmon over the years on what he was achieving with Tiger and the important element that Butch had going for him was Tiger’s youth and his father/son relationship.  Tiger was willing with no argument to do what Butch asked him to do.  It’s sort of like having your 10, 12-year-old son do everything that you ask him to do, they will do it without thinking.  But once your son gets to 16, 17 and 18 they start getting a mind of their own and resist doing what there told.  That was one of the reasons for the Butch/Tiger spilt up, Tiger just didn’t buy into what Butch wanted to tell him all the time.  That was a problem with Haney and Tiger, again Woods was smarter and on some things resisted some of Haney’s ways of doing it.

I can only imagine some of the talks and practice sessions Tiger and Foley had, this is one of the reasons Tiger never achieved the greatness because there was a lack of confidence with things and it never got better, even in 2013 when he won five times.

So what does all of this mean?  Your guess is as good as mine.  I have to think that Tiger is really screwed up right now in the way he is swinging and thinking, he lacks conviction and confidence.  So the question is, can he do it on his own and figure it all out?  The last thing he needs is another “great” coach to show him that “great” coaches swing theories.  What Woods really needs is someone that is willing to be a pair of eyes and tell Woods what inconsistencies creep up.  If I was to choose a person for that job it would probably be Butch, honesty he is more about giving encouragement and experience to the player over swing changes.  Butch could probably talk Tiger into a better game than change his swing.  But the odds on this happening are very slim.

First there is a rift that only Butch and Tiger knows about that caused the problems in 2002.  Tiger is also very selfish and doesn’t want anyone that coaches him to work with others.  Also, Butch won’t get on a plane to work with Tiger in Florida, Tiger would have to come to Las Vegas to work with Butch.  Lastly, Tiger is very, very cheap and you would be surprised at how little he pays these guys.  Butch is very private on this other than saying that he made more working with Phil Mickelson in their first two months than the 8 years he worked with Tiger.  To look at it the way Woods thinks, he feels that someone working with him reaps the benefits of this and it replaces the money he needs to pay.

But if Tiger wants Butch this time around he can’t be cheap.  Butch will want a very healthy retainer along with a percentage of Tiger’s future earnings.  As much as Butch’s ego is (which is really big) and would love to make Tiger a great player again, Butch will be 71 years old this week and is slowing down.  He has a great list of players that he works with and he knows that working with Tiger could possibly screw this up.   So a player/coach relationship would probably not work.

What wouldn’t surprise me happening is that Butch and Tiger find some peaceful ground, Tiger spends like a month with Butch in Vegas to get not only the basics down, but have Butch stoke his confidence.  So I see a  “relationship” in which  Butch will only be a pair of eyes and won’t “officially” be Tiger’s 24/7 coach.  You ask Butch, and he will agree in Jack Nicklaus thinking that you have to own your swing and work things out yourself.

One last thing in writing this, who knows maybe someone like Nicklaus would spend some time with Woods as a pair of eyes and get Woods back on track.  If Woods would just commit to one small series of modifications on his swing, he could probably get back to the level that he use to be.  It has always stunned me that Tiger Woods is one of three top players of all time (Nicklaus & Ben Hogan), and he has had to change his swing with Haney and Foley.  In my mind that has been a big waste and one of the reasons for his problems.

One last item:

This is the last week for Tom Watson to make his final three wild card picks for the Ryder Cup.  Odds are that Hunter Mahan got one of those picks with the win at the Barclays, but the two other picks are wide open.  Have to think that if a Ryan Moore, Keegan Bradley, Webb Simpson, Brandt Snedeker win or even place in the top-three this week it will help put them on the team.

Tournament information:

  • This is the 12th annual Deutsche Bank Championship. Initially created with the help of IMG, the Tiger Woods Foundation, and the PGA Tour, the Deutsche Bank Championship’s main goal was to raise money for the Tiger Woods Foundation.
  • As the tournament is held over Labor Day weekend, it has the distinction as being the only tournament on the PGA Tour to conclude on a Monday.
  • Though the event lacks history, its short stint on the PGA Tour has produced some monumental happenings. Most notably: the rivalry between Vijay Singh and Tiger Woods. In 2004, Tiger and Vijay battled down to the final hole. Ultimately, Singh’s 69 was enough to give him the tournament title and the World’s Number One ranking, dethroning Woods after five years of dominance.
  • In 2006, the rivalry was renewed, and this time, Woods was not to be denied. Singh shot a course record 61 in the third round going into the final round with a three-shot lead over Woods.  Despite shooting a 68, he was still a loser as Woods shot 63 to overcome a three-shot deficit and win the title.
  • The 2007 event is also memorable with Phil Mickelson holding off the challenge of Tiger Woods, Arron Oberholser and Brett Wetterich.
  • In 2008 Vijay Singh shot a final round 63 and cruised to a five-shot victory which paved the way for him to win the FedEx Cup.
  • Since the start of the FedEx Cup, it’s been the second playoff event.  Of the four, this and the Tour Championship are the only events played each year on the same course.  Over the years, it’s grown a nice following as players love the course and location and the week.

Course information:

The TPC of Boston was opened in June of 2002, it was formerly used for charcoal production for the jewelry, brick and iron industries as well as lumber for ship construction.  Arnold Palmer designed the course, it is your typical TPC layout, very long and pretty generous off the tee.  There are several doglegs that can be carried by long hitters so again advantage to those that hit it long.  The greens are large, and several have multiple tiers making putting more challenging.  But over the years the course has changed dramatically.

As players matriculate back to Boston each year for the Deutsche Bank Championship, they were met with changes made by Gil Hanse and Brad Faxon.  In 2009 changes to the green area and mounding around the 2nd hole.  In 2008 players saw changes to the 4th, 7th and 16th holes.  The changes weren’t as big, mostly cosmetic like mounds being added to the right side of nine.  Also, changes were made to the chipping areas around No. 1 and No. 10 greens. Bunkers also were altered in shape at the fourth and 11th holes. At the latter, a 230-yard par-3, and island of turf was installed in the middle of the large front-right bunker.

The changes made for the 2007 event was well received by the players, most of them liked making the 4th hole a possible drivable par 4. It’s a step in the right direction because in previous years they have been very luke warm on the Arnold Palmer design course.

There are no real major changes to the course for this year.  The course has pretty much been the same for a couple of years now.

Still the course is for the taking, last year the course played to a 69.207 average and was the 39th toughest of the 43 courses used.  So you can see, you have to go low to survive this week.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the Deutsche Bank Championship:

Key stat for the winner:

  • Now in past years it was obvious that this course was a long hitters haven.  Last year we had Henrik Stenson who is in the middle of all driving distance stats but in 2012, we had Rory McIlroy, in 2010 we had Charley Hoffman.  In 2008, it was Vijay Singh while in 2007, it was Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods in 2006, all very long hitters  Still don’t rule out the short hitters, just look at 2009 winner Steve Stricker, the same with Webb Simpson in 2011.  But he isn’t the only one, the 2005 champion Olin Browne is one of the shorter hitters on tour and 2003 runner-up Rocco Mediate is also short.  In the same breath, it’s safe to say that accuracy doesn’t pay on this course.  In it’s 11 years of being played, of the 140 players that have finished in the top-ten in driving accuracy, only 30 have been in the top-ten.  One more key driving accuracy stat, of the 43 courses used on the PGA Tour it ranked 36th in driving accuracy that means that you can be wild on this course.
  • Looking at the stats from its ten-year history, look for those with sharp iron games to produce the best score.  Look for a smart player that doesn’t attack the holes but plays placement golf to win.  Of the 11 winners, three led the greens hit category (winner Henrik Stenson led in 2013) while the first eight of nine winners were in the top-ten.
  •  Since the event doesn’t start until Friday, players will have an extra day to get use to the course.  Look for those that are starting to practice on Tuesday to rule the roost.
  • The greens are 6,000 square feet, which is about average on the PGA Tour. They have a lot of undulation in them, and that could be one of the reasons why winners haven’t dominated the putting stats.
  • There are only three par 5s on the course. In looking at the winners Adam Scott in 2003 was 13 under par, Singh in 2004 was 9 under par, Browne in 2005 was 5 under, Woods in 2006 was 9 under, Phil Mickelson in 2007 was 10 under  in 2008 Vijay was 12 under while in 2009 Steve Stricker was 10 under, in 2010 Charley Hoffman was 9 under while Webb Simpson was 7 under in 2011, Rory McIlroy was 5 under while Henrik Stenson last year was also 5 under so being low on the long holes has plenty of benefits.
  • Interesting to note that Vijay Singh, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy won the Deutsche Bank the month after taking the PGA Championship.  It’s also interesting to note that Deutsche Bank winners Woods, Singh and Adam Scott have also been runner-up here.  As for this year’s PGA Champion Rory McIlroy, you have to think he is chomping at the bit for Friday’s opening round.
  • In conclusion, look for those that have been playing well the last couple of weeks to do well this week.  Of course, we know the track record of Rory McIlroy. Usually the defending champion doesn’t play good, so don’t expect a good week out of Henrik Stenson, who has not had the type of summer he had last year.
  • Lastly, the outlook for the tournament couldn’t be any better if this was a Sunday finish.  But the long range forecast calls for great weather, until late Sunday when clouds will move in and could see some rain on Monday.

 

 

 

Who to watch for at the Deutsche Bank Championship

Best Bets:

Adam Scott

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T53 T7 T8 T5 T73 T17 T50 T2 Win

This course sets up perfectly for him, I was really surprised at his poor finish last year. Know he will do better this week.

Rory McIlroy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T47 Win T37

With his length, it’s hard to find anyone that will beat him on this course this week.

Jason Day

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T13 T51 T3 T2 T19 T50

Another player in which this course is perfect for. Played well last week and at the PGA, he is due for a win real soon.

Best of the rest:

Rickie Fowler

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T74 T52 T41

Has struggled at TPC Boston, but on the PGA Tour has played great finishing in the top-ten in his last six starts going back to the U.S. Open.

Brandt Snedeker

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T47 6 T3 T5 T32 T27 T47

Has played well at TPC Boston, he really needs to shine this week to make the Ryder Cup team.

Phil Mickelson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T41 T4 T10 T25 T27 T73 Win

This could be his last start of the year if he doesn’t play well, but this course is good for him and I see him doing some great things.

Geoff Oglivy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
First time playing in this event

Another of those players that does well on this course, look for a good week, he really needs it to make it into next week.

Solid contenders

Jim Furyk

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T27 T13 6 T37 T8 T7 T55 T35 T13

Boy he has frustrated a lot of folks on not being able to do the job in the final round. This course is great for him but I just don’t see him shaking his last round problems overnight.

Ernie Els

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T20 T26 T16 T30 CUT T3

His play of late puts him on our scope, he could surprise a lot of folks this week.

Patrick Reed

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T70

Has shown some life the last couple of weeks, look for him to play well and get another top-ten.

Hunter Mahan

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T13 T39 T8 T33 T36 T15 CUT T22 CUT T25 CUT

Has never missed a start in this event, still only one top-ten but is playing well and wants to make sure to secure that wild card spot on the Ryder Cup team.

Long shots that could come through:

Gary Woodland

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T41 T25

Another of those players that should own this course.

William McGirt

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
CUT T26 T42

Playing well coming into this week, only problem the course is not really suited for his game.

Vijay Singh

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T26 CUT T11 T54 Win T60 2 Win 4

Remember he has won twice on this course and still has some life left in him to make that one last rally.

Kid is not very sharp these days

Jordan Spieth

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T4

Yes he finished T-4th last year but his game is not very sharp right now, don’t expect much from him.

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