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BlogBMW Preview and Picks

BMW Championship

September 4 – 7, 2014

Cherry Hills C.C.

Cherry Hills Village, Co.

Par: 70 / Yardage: 7,352

Purse: $8 million

with $1,440,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Zach Johnson

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 33 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with all top-ten players in the field : #1 Rory McIlroy, #2 Adam Scott, #3 Henrik Stenson, #4 Justin Rose, #5 Justin Rose, #6 Jason Day  #7 Jim Furyk, #8 Matt Kuchar, #9 Bubba Watson, and #10 Phil Mickelson.  From 11 to 25 there are 11 of the 15 with #11 Rickie Fowler, #12 Martin Kaymer, #14 Jordan Spieth,  #15 Zach Johnson, #16 Graeme McDowell, #18 Hideki Matsuyama, #19 Jimmy Walker, #20 Hunter Mahan, #22 Charl Schwartzel, #23 Keegan Bradley and #25 Chris Kirk. Between 26 and 50 there are 13 of the 25, they are   #27 Patrick Reed, #31 Bill Haas, #32 Webb Simpson, #35 Kevin Na, #35 Ian Poulter, #40 Graham DeLaet, #41 Ryan Moore, #42 Marc Leishman, #43 Kevin Streelman, #44 Brendon Todd, #45 Billy Horschel, #48 Gary Woodland and #49 Ernie Els.

Last year there was 37 players from the top-50 so two more this year.

The field includes all top-70 from the FedEx Cup rankings except for Dustin Johnson.

The field includes all 24 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list (Dustin Johnson only one missing).

The field includes six past champions: Zach Johnson (2012), Rory McIlroy (2012), Justin Rose (2011), Camilo Villegas (2008),Jim Furyk (2005) and Jerry Kelly (2002).

The field includes a 32 players that have won 42 events on the PGA Tour this year: Jimmy Walker (Frys.com Open, Sony Open in Hawaii & AT&T Pebble), Webb Simpson (Shriners Hospitals); Ryan Moore (CIMB CLassic); Chris Kirk (McGladrey Classic & Deutsche Bank), Harris English (OHL Classic at Mayakoba); Zach Johnson (Hyundai T of C); Chesson Hadley (Puerto Rico); Patrick Reed (Humana & Cadillac); Kevin Stadler (WM Phoenix); Bubba Watson (Northern Trust & Masters); Jason Day (WGC-Accenture); Russell Henley (Honda); John Senden (Valspar Championship); Matt Every (Palmer); Steve Bowditch (Valero Texas); Matt Jones (Shell Houston); Matt Kuchar (RBC Heritage); Seung-Yul Noh (Zurich); J.B. Holmes (Wells Fargo) Martin Kaymer (Players & U.S. Open); Ben Crane (FedEx St. Jude); Brendon Todd (Byron Nelson); Adam Scott (Colonial); Hideki Matsuyama (Memorial); Kevin Streelman (Travelers);  Angel Cabrera (Greenbrier); Brian Harman (John Deere); Rory McIlroy (Open Championship, Bridgestone & PGA Championship), Tim Clark (RBC Canadian Open), Geoff Ogilvy (Barracuda), Camilo Villegas (Wyndham) and Hunter Mahan (The Barclays).

The only one not in the field is Dustin Johnson (WGC-HSBC Champions) & Scott Stallings (Farmers).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the BMW field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the BMW field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the BMW field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the BMW Championship

Player Deutsche Bank Open D’Italia The Barclays Czech Masters Wyndham Champ. Made in Denmark PGA Champ. WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Canadian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open
Rory McIlroy
(555 pts)
T5
(105)
DNP T22
(42)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(176)
Win
(132)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP T14
(12)
Jim Furyk
(363.83 pts)
T23
(40.5)
DNP 8
(75)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(93.33)
T15
(35)
DNP 2
(66.67)
4
(53.33)
DNP DNP
Rickie Fowler
(361.33 pts)
T23
(40.5)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP DNP DNP T3
(120)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP T8
(16.67)
Hunter Mahan
(311.67 pts)
64
(0)
DNP Win
(198)
DNP DNP DNP T7
(73.33)
T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T32
(12)
DNP DNP
Jason Day
(274.17 pts)
T7
(82.5)
DNP T2
(150)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(46.67)
WD
(-5)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
DNP DNP
Bill Haas
(259.67 pts)
T9
(67.5)
DNP T15
(52.5)
DNP T2
(100)
DNP T27
(30.67)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP
Adam Scott
(246.83 pts)
T16
(51)
DNP T15
(52.5)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(46.67)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP
Geoff Ogilvy
(239 pts)
T2
(150)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP T46
(5.33)
DNP Win
(88)
T34
(10.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Matt Kuchar
(227.83 pts)
T29
(31.5)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(38)
DNP T4
(53.33)
T54
(0)
DNP DNP
Ernie Els
(225.5 pts)
T50
(1.5)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP T64
(0)
DNP T7
(73.33)
T26
(24)
DNP T12
(25.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T41
(3)
Henrik Stenson
(212.33 pts)
T26
(36)
DNP T38
(18)
DNP DNP DNP T3
(120)
T19
(31)
DNP DNP T39
(7.33)
DNP DNP
Chris Kirk
(211 pts)
Win
(198)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP T19
(20.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Charl Schwartzel
(208.5 pts)
T43
(10.5)
DNP T30
(30)
DNP DNP DNP T15
(46.67)
T4
(80)
DNP T43
(4.67)
T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP
Phil Mickelson
(206.83 pts)
T45
(7.5)
DNP 78
(0)
DNP DNP DNP 2
(133.33)
T15
(35)
DNP DNP T23
(18)
DNP T11
(13)
Justin Rose
(206.67 pts)
DNP DNP T30
(30)
DNP DNP DNP T24
(34.67)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP T23
(18)
DNP Win
(44)
Sergio Garcia
(186.67 pts)
DNP DNP T57
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T35
(20)
2
(100)
DNP DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP DNP
William McGirt
(180.67 pts)
T69
(0)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP T8
(50)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T25
(16.67)
DNP T23
(9)
DNP
Jimmy Walker
(168.83 pts)
T9
(67.5)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP T7
(73.33)
T26
(24)
DNP DNP T26
(16)
DNP T41
(3)
Patrick Reed
(166.83 pts)
T74
(0)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP T24
(26)
DNP T58
(0)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
John Senden
(159.33 pts)
T5
(105)
DNP T22
(42)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T26
(24)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
T45
(1.67)
DNP
Zach Johnson
(155.33 pts)
T16
(51)
DNP T22
(42)
DNP DNP DNP T69
(0)
T23
(27)
DNP DNP T47
(2)
2
(33.33)
DNP
Russell Henley
(146.67 pts)
T2
(150)
DNP T61
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T27
(7.67)
DNP
Ryan Palmer
(144.33 pts)
T16
(51)
DNP T74
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(93.33)
DNP DNP DNP T58
(0)
DNP T51
(0)
Keegan Bradley
(138.33 pts)
T16
(51)
DNP T53
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP T19
(20.67)
DNP DNP
Cameron Tringale
(136.67 pts)
T69
(0)
DNP T2
(150)
DNP DNP DNP DQ
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the BMW Championship

Player Deutsche Bank Open D’Italia The Barclays Czech Masters Wyndham Champ. Made in Denmark PGA Champ. WGC Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Canadian Open British Open John Deere Scottish Open
Harris English
(-31 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T31
(19)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T74
(0)
DNP
Matt Every
(-25.33 pts)
80
(0)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T47
(3)
DNP DNP 71
(0)
DNP DNP
Will MacKenzie
(-23.17 pts)
T45
(7.5)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T27
(7.67)
DNP
Charley Hoffman
(-5 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T30
(30)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T67
(0)
DNP DNP
George McNeill
(-3.5 pts)
T29
(31.5)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
K.J. Choi
(2.5 pts)
T35
(22.5)
DNP T71
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T66
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
Brendon Todd
(3.33 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T46
(6)
DNP DNP DNP 72
(0)
T45
(5)
DNP DNP T39
(7.33)
DNP DNP
Erik Compton
(4.83 pts)
CUT
(-15)
DNP T19
(46.5)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
Matt Jones
(9.33 pts)
78
(0)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP T46
(5.33)
T31
(19)
DNP DNP T54
(0)
DNP 78
(0)
Ben Crane
(19.83 pts)
T29
(31.5)
DNP CUT
(-15)
DNP DNP DNP WD
(-6.67)
WD
(-5)
DNP T34
(10.67)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

So it’s the third leg of the FedEx Cup playoffs, this is probably the one with the biggest cut off.  Up until now you can see that a lot of players that won in 2014, guys like Chesson Hadley, Seung-Yul Noh and Steven Bowditch are still in the field but will get cut on Sunday, unless they have a good week.  This is the overall problem I have with the way the FedEx Cup is done.  It gives way too much credence for that one win and for those that do well in the Barclays and Deutsche Bank.  So for half of the winners in 2014, they are just hanging on because of those wins and will be gone by next week.

One person that I am impressed with is Geoff Ogilvy. With his missed cut at the U.S. Open and then a T-34th at the Canadian Open, he went home to Arizona thinking his season was finished.  In his mind, being 151st in the FedEx Cup race meaning not playing in the FedEx Cup playoffs along with not playing in the PGA Championship meant that he wasn’t going to play again till Frys.  But his wife Juli talked him into playing in the Barracuda Championship and as we so often say, the rest is history.  He won the Barracuda, which got him into the PGA Championship and the FedEx Cup playoffs.  Even though he missed the cut at the Barclays, he was lucky enough to finish on the number, 100, which got him into the Deutsche Bank.  Finishing T-2nd not only gets him into the BMW Championship but probably the Tour Championship since he is 24th in the rankings.  In a way, it reminds me of what happened to Heath Slocum in 2009.  In that year, he didn’t have a very good summer and after missing the cut at the Wyndham Championship thought he wasn’t going to make the playoffs.  But he was lucky and got the 124th spot and won the Barclays.  So in a matter of about a week he went from thinking he wasn’t going to be in the playoffs to then ranked 3rd with a chance of winning.  He didn’t play very well in his last three events but finished 8th in the rankings which is the biggest climb that anyone has ever made in the rankings, 116 spots.  Ogilvy will not break Slocum’s mark of 116 spots since he entered the Barclays 83rd in the rankings, still he has a lot to be proud of with his rapid climb since the end of July.

Is four straight weeks too much?

The answer is yes, yes and yes again.  There are some grumblings that not having a week off in between the Deutsche Bank and BMW is not right.  I for one who thinks most of the players on the PGA are too pampered, agree with their feeling that four straight weeks is too long without a break.  The reason for no off week is the request from the PGA of America and European Tour to have a week off between the Tour Championship and the Ryder Cup.  Players were not happy in 2012 when they had no break between the Tour Championship and the Ryder Cup, but they were given that week off before the Tour Championship.  Frankly only about half of the players in the Ryder Cup will be at the Tour Championship so getting that week off in between doesn’t make as much sense as getting this week off in between the Deutsche Bank and BMW.  Adding to the problem this year is the distance between Boston and Denver and the fact that most of the field has never seen Cherry Hills.  With a Monday finish in Boston it makes it hard on the players to get adjusted to the time change and a new course.  Next year the PGA Tour has put in that off  week in between the Deutsche Bank and BMW but we won’t know what they will do for 2016 which is really crowded with the Ryder Cup and Olympics.

Talking about the Ryder Cup

So it’s Captain Watson’ time to shine on Tuesday night with his three captain picks.  After the PGA Championship he knew the task would be tough and for the players on the bubble they haven’t made his choices any easier.  Now Hunter Mahan probably has won a spot on the team thanks to his T7th at the PGA Championship and victory at the Barclays.  Many may think that Chris Kirk has also earned a spot on the team with his win the Deutsche Bank.  I don’t think so and with some of his media comments about him going to the Georgia game the week of the Ryder Cup no matter what, probably hasn’t helped his cause much.  I would love if Tuesday night Watson would say; “geez I wanted to pick Kirk, but he says that he feels the Georgia game is more important.”  Of course Watson has a lot of class and won’t do that.

So after Mahan who is Watson going to pick?  You have to think that experience is important, remember in 1993 Watson chose Lanny Wadkins and Raymond Floyd.  Don’t think he will go to the same extremes but I do think experience in both the Ryder and Presidents Cup is important.  That’s why I feel Watson will take Keegan Bradley and Bill Haas.  For Keegan, he would have the same presence in the team room as Ian Poulter.  As for Haas, just look at his play of late, he was T9th at the Deutsche Bank, T-15th at the Barclays and T-2nd at the Wyndham so he is in good form.  He also has played in two Presidents Cup.  Now Watson could also go for Webb Simpson, he missed the cut at the PGA Championship and Barclays, but did finish T-5th at Wyndham and T-9ht a Deutsche.

UPDATE:
Boy talk about the tale of two shows. After watching a very shaky morning show from England on the European Tour picks, Golf Channel and the PGA of America produced a first class show. Yes it was way too long, thank goodness for DVR to skip over all of that crap in the first hour, but the production of the picks was great. Like the fact that money was spent in getting the three picks on camera to respond and answer question what an abortion this morning was no being able to hear the players with poor reception and poor planning.

As for the picks it’s the way I thought. Yes I thought Bill Haas would be a notch better for the team, but I have no complaints of the three picks and Webb Simpson was just as good of a pick as anyone else.

Only thing, despite the great American production it’s still going to be a long haul for team USA to snatch the cup away from the European Team. On paper they are more solid than team USA, they have the best players in the world and we have seen the motivation that each match brings. Can team USA pull an upset, yes. Despite many saying that Tom Watson is not in touch because of his age, I think that he brings the experience and passion to pull off the upset.

Guess time will tell. Oh for all of you that are interested in the history of the Ryder Cup, Golfstats has put together the only database in being able to get information on every player that has participated in the matches and every result. Not only is ours the only database on the Web, you can also sort each player to see how he has done in each format, with his partners and how he has fared among the players he has been in matches which.

For more try our our Ryder Cup database here:

Tournament information:

  • The Western Open was originally founded and run by the Western Golf Association. First played in 1899, the event is the third oldest professional golf tournament (U.S. Open and British Open are older). Like the other golf tournaments of the time, the Western Open was dominated by visiting professionals from England and Scotland. In its early decades, it was widely regarded as a major championship
  • From 1899 until 1961, the Western Open was played at a variety of locations including Phoenix, Salt Lake City, and San Francisco to name a few. Beginning in 1962, however, the Western Open settled into the Chicago area. It was hosted at different local courses in and around the city.
  • In 1974, the Butler National Golf Club in Oak Brook, became the annual venue for the Western Open. The Butler National Golf Club remained the host site until shortly after the 1990 tournament, when the PGA Tour adopted a policy of holding events only at clubs that allowed minorities and women to be members.
  • This resulted in Butler National being replaced by the Cog Hill Golf & Country Club in Lemont, Illinois. The Dubsdread Course at Cog Hill played host to the Western Open from 1991 to 2007. With the advent of the new FedEx Cup Series, the PGA Tour decided a change of name was in order. The event name change to the BMW Championship.  Along with the change it was decided to move the tournament around. In 2008 for the first time since 1962 the event was not played in the Chicago area as it moved to St. Louis for the year. In 2012 it went to Indianapolis, Indiana and last year went for the first time to Conway Farms, a course that will hold next year’s BMW Championship.  But the thought for the future of this event is to move it around, looks like Crooked Stick in Indianapolis will get the 2016 BMW and there have been quiet rumors that Harding Park in San Francisco could one day host this event.  The point is, look for this event to move around the country.

Off to Cherry Hills

What a great choice using Cherry Hills for the BMW Championship.  Cherry Hills has earned its place in championship history, and many think that just because the USGA or PGA don’t use it for their championships that the course isn’t tough anymore.  That’s not the case.  It’s like the scenario of Riviera in Los Angeles in which the neighborhood grew up to the point that Riviera or Cherry Hills can’t handle a really big event.  The same course that held three U.S. Opens, a U.S. Senior Open, and two PGA Championships is not the same course that will be used this week.  The original William Flynn layout underwent a restoration and modification headed by Tom Doak in 2008. That work primarily involved changes to three greens and bunkers, the removal of trees and a lengthening of some holes.  That along with the always tough Bluegrass rough will make Cherry Hills shine this week, and it needs to.  That’s because the club would like to have another U.S. Open or PGA Championship in future years so this week is very important to them.

Course information:

  • Cherry Hills was opened in 1922 and designed by William Flynn.  Tom Doak did some touch up work in 2008, but the basic course and routing has never changed in 92 years.  The rolling terrain and meandering creek help in making this a true test of golf. The opening hole is best-known for being the par four that Arnold Palmer drove on the final day of the 1960 U.S. Open, which lead to a birdie and eventually the victory. The back nine is Cherry Hills’ strength on the merits of the 12th, 14th, 16th, 17th, and 18th holes which features several hazards and classic shapes. Overall, Cherry Hills is a classicly designed parkland course that may not blow you away on your first visit, but is the type of design that builds up throughout the round and finishes with a bang.
  • Water comes in play on nine holes, but drastically on only five holes, 12, 14, 16, 17 and 18.  The hardest hole could be the 18th, which for the members plays as a par 5, but for this week will be a 477 yard par 4.  Water comes in play in which you have to drive over it, and you can cut off as much as you chose with the lake down the left-hand side.  Water also plays an important factor on the 16th hole and the par 5, 17th which has an island green.  Lot’s of decisions on either laying up and going for this green will be made this week.  Four of the par 4s plays over 475 yards as distance is reduced on this course that sits at over 5,000 feet in elevation.
  • Also look for tough fairways to hit and once you do the greens only average 4,700 square feet making them very hard to hit.  There may be 82 bunkers, but they are more for decoration than making the course tougher to play.  From the back tees, Cherry Hills has a 74.7 rating and a 139 slope.

Key stat for the winner:

Learning this course in a short amount of time.  Only 10% of the field has seen the course, yes Phil Mickelson won the 1990 Amateur on it but in looking at the 2012 Amateur, Jordan Spieth was the only player to make it to match play and he lost his round of 64 match.  Cameron Tringale played the 2009 Palmer Cup at Cherry Hills, but for the others they have not played a competition on the course.  Cherry Hills head pro told the Denver Post that some of the players flew to Denver over the summer and played practice rounds on the course but on the whole, very few have seen the course.  With the Deutsche Bank ending on Monday, it could mean that most of the players will only see the course once or twice before Thursday’s first round.  In the past, looking at first time courses on the PGA Tour nobody has an advantage so a Matt Every or Steven Bowditch could have the same odds as a Rory McIlroy or Adam Scott.

I also can see high scoring this week, with the lack of knowledge par tends to be the King as birdies and eagles are scarce.  I can see ten under being the winning score this week as players try to learn the secrets of playing the course.

Remember this, tight fairways and small greens make this a scramblers delight.  Look at the scrambling stats for the year and don’t be shocked to see those in the top-ten (Jim Furyk (1st), Kevin Na (2nd), Sergio Garcia (4th), Brendon Todd (6th), Jason Day (8th), Chris Kirk (9th) and Jordan Spieth (10th) winning this week.

So with hard greens to hit, does this favor a Rory McIlroy?  Yes, in looking at the Greens hit stat for 2014 he is 6th which favors him in hitting lots of greens.  With Henrik Stenson T8th and Sergio Garcia 10th they could be your winner this week.

Another important element in small greens, making putts in the 5 to 15 foot range, on new courses and ones with small greens great putters always do well.

Lastly, the weather in Denver.  In the summer they always seem to get late afternoon thunderstorms everyday, that’s just the life of Denver in the summer.  This week is more of the same, long range forecast is for scattered Thunderstorms Friday through Sunday.

 

Who to watch for at the BMW Championship

Best Bets:

Rory McIlroy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T59 Win T37

Based on the fact that Rory’s game should match Cherry Hills I also go with the favorite.

Sergio Garcia

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T18 T24 T12 T6 T20 9

Think that he will be very special this week and wish that a major could be played at Cherry Hills in the coming years.

Bill Haas

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T28 T45 T16 T30 T10 T30

Time to show that he is ready to blossom this week.

Best of the rest:

Phil Mickelson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T33 T2 T56 T8 T30 T17 T65 T30

Not as far fetch as you think, he played well last week in the Deutsche Bank and has fond memories of this course from winning the 1990 U.S. Amateur.

Rickie Fowler

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T39 T41 48 T45

Course should be good for him, he is a fast learner and can win this week.

Jason Day

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T4 T49 T54 T59

Can’t forget about him, played well last week and the week before, could be a good candidate to win this week.

Justin Rose

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T33 T16 Win T21 T5 T19 CUT

If the course has terrible rough he could be the favorite this week.

Solid contenders

Jim Furyk

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
3 9 T22 T15 T2 T3 T14 T4 Win T7 T3

Gosh not to again go to the well with someone who can’t seem to close the deed on Sunday’s, but his qualifications are really good as he may be closure to a win than we think.

Webb Simpson

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T24 T51 5 T61

Be interesting to see what happens with him and the Ryder Cup. If he doesn’t make the team look for him to have a breakout week to prove them all wrong.

Martin Kaymer

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
First time playing in this event

Like him on both this course and Eastlake, showed some signs last week that he is ready to play great golf again.

Adam Scott

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T28 T6 T37 T15 T50 4 T21

Not playing that great right now, but he can break out of his funk at any time.

Long shots that could come through:

Geoff Ogilvy

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T28 3 T24 T55 T28 T61 T34 T5 CUT T58

Question for him is if this is for real or nothing more than a really good streak. We always thought he would be a superstar, could prove a lot this week.

Russell Henley

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T39

Played great last week, be interesting to see if that was the start of something big.

Gary Woodland

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T18 T16

Course could be perfect for him.

Not this week:

Jordan Spieth

2013 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03 ’02
T16

Sorry but his game is not very sharp this week.

Comments

  1. Eric Simon says:

    Thoughts on Villegas? Great history here a few years back and the recent win seems to bode well for him to perform

  2. My thought on Villegas is that he is a model of inconsistencies.
    Just look at his record the last ten weeks,
    http://www.golfstats.com/search/?yr=2014&tournament=&player=Camilo+Villegas&tour=All&submit=go
    yes he won at Wyndham but hasn’t shown us anything else.
    Frankly I wouldn’t touch Villegas, I feel that the Wyndham was a fluke that happens to a lot of players. Sometimes wins don’t translate to great play afterwards.

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