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BlogWyndham Preview and Picks

Wyndham Championship

August 20th – 23rd, 2015

Sedgefield Country Club

Greensboro,, N.C.

Par: 70 / Yardage:7,081

Purse: $5.4 million

with $972,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Camilo Villegas

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

Sorry for this being a day late, travel back from Wisconsin was harder than I thought.

The field includes 11 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with no one from the top-ten in the field: The highest rank player is #12 Adam Scott, #18 Hideki Matsuyama, #17 Brooks Koepka, #20 Granden Grace, #21 Martin Kaymer and Billy Horschel from the top-25 players. There are five players from 26 to 50 in the rankings, they are #27 Paul Casey,  #28 Brandt Snedeker, #30 Bill Haas, $43 Ryan Moore and #45 Webb Simpson.

Last year there was only 5 players from the top-50 so six more this year.

The field includes 6 of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2015.  Those players are #13 Brandt Snedeker, #16 Brooks Koepka, #19 Hideki Matsuyama, #22 Paul Casey and #23 Bill Haas.

The field includes 4 players in the top 25 on this year’s PGA Tour money list. Those players are #11 Brandt Snedeker, #16 Brooks Koepka, #18 Hideki Matsuyama, #21 Paul Casey and #25 Bill Haas.

The field includes 6 past champions: Camilo Villegas (2014), Webb Simpson (2011), Ryan Moore (2009), Carl Pettersson (2008), Brandt Snedeker (2007), Davis Love III (2006, & 1992).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the Wyndham Championship field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the Wyndham Championship field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the Wyndham Championship field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

**NOTE**

One thing to look for is our new GOLFstats IQ.  For those that play in fantasy golf it’s a perfect way to help you pick those players in Draft Kings and Victiv games.  You can customize the list of those in the tournaments, to look back a couple or many years of tournament stats and you can go back a couple or ten weeks prior to the tournament.  On top of that, all the stats are fully sortable to help you pick your six players, we even give you their value for the week to help you chose.

That’s GOLFstats IQ, give it a try and tell us what you think of it

24/7 GOLF

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We have the perfect solution for you.  If you own a Iphone or a Ipad we have developed a perfect app called 24/7 GOLF.

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So check it out, just hit this link to get 24/7 GOLF:

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 12.01.34 AM

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the Wyndham Championship

Player PGA Champion. WGC-Bridgestone Barracuda Quicken Loans Paul Lawrie Matchplay Canadian Open European Masters British Open Barbasol John Deere Scottish Open The Greenbrier French Open
Brooks Koepka
(323.33 pts)
5
(140)
6
(90)
DNP DNP DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP T10
(53.33)
DNP DNP T22
(18.67)
DNP DNP
Branden Grace
(291.5 pts)
3
(180)
17
(49.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T20
(40)
DNP DNP T17
(22)
DNP DNP
Justin Thomas
(190.67 pts)
18
(64)
DNP DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP T54
(0)
DNP
Will Wilcox
(165.67 pts)
DNP DNP T10
(40)
T21
(29)
DNP DNP DNP DNP 2
(66.67)
T8
(33.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
J.J. Henry
(161.67 pts)
72
(0)
DNP Win
(132)
T63
(0)
DNP T41
(6)
DNP DNP T23
(18)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T13
(12.33)
DNP
Martin Kaymer
(160.83 pts)
12
(76)
45
(7.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP 4
(26.67)
Tom Hoge
(118 pts)
DNP DNP T10
(40)
T39
(11)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP T16
(22.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP
Ricky Barnes
(111.33 pts)
DNP DNP T18
(32)
T63
(0)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP DNP T3
(60)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T67
(0)
DNP
Austin Cook
(104.67 pts)
DNP DNP T22
(28)
DNP DNP T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP T6
(40)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Billy Horschel
(102.17 pts)
25
(50)
33
(25.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T30
(26.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Luke Donald
(101.33 pts)
43
(14)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T74
(0)
DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP T7
(36.67)
DNP DNP
Bill Haas
(100.83 pts)
65
(0)
25
(37.5)
DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Ollie Schniederjans
(94.33 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
T15
(35)
DNP T22
(18.67)
DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP T77
(0)
DNP DNP
Paul Casey
(93.83 pts)
30
(40)
17
(49.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T74
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP
Kyle Reifers
(90.67 pts)
DNP DNP 2
(100)
T46
(4)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T67
(0)
DNP
Johnson Wagner
(90.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP DNP T10
(26.67)
T5
(46.67)
DNP T32
(6)
DNP
Carl Pettersson
(88.67 pts)
75
(0)
DNP DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP T12
(25.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Brandt Snedeker
(88.17 pts)
12
(76)
33
(25.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Hideki Matsuyama
(88.17 pts)
37
(26)
37
(19.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T18
(42.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Andres Gonzales
(87.67 pts)
DNP DNP 4
(80)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T22
(18.67)
DNP DNP T48
(1.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP
Chad Campbell
(85.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T11
(39)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP DNP T48
(1.33)
T28
(14.67)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP
George Coetzee
(83.33 pts)
7
(110)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
Vaughn Taylor
(81.67 pts)
DNP DNP T25
(25)
T30
(20)
DNP T41
(6)
DNP DNP T10
(26.67)
T44
(4)
DNP DNP DNP
Patrick Rodgers
(76.67 pts)
DNP DNP 3
(90)
T67
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T60
(0)
DNP
Whee Kim
(75.67 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
T11
(39)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T3
(60)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T67
(0)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the Wyndham Championship

Player PGA Champion. WGC-Bridgestone Barracuda Quicken Loans Paul Lawrie Matchplay Canadian Open European Masters British Open Barbasol John Deere Scottish Open The Greenbrier French Open
Martin Laird
(-43.33 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP
Daniel Berger
(-40.67 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T41
(6)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Matt Every
(-40 pts)
CUT
(-20)
74
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Bo Van Pelt
(-36.67 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Tim Clark
(-36.67 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T63
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP
D.A. Points
(-30 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP T72
(0)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Andrew Svoboda
(-28.67 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T58
(0)
DNP DNP T48
(1.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Davis Love III
(-26.67 pts)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T54
(0)
DNP
Carlos Sainz Jr.
(-25.33 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T48
(1.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Byeong-Hun An
(-23.33 pts)
CUT
(-20)
57
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T70
(0)
DNP T20
(10)

How Player Rankings are Computed

The PGA Championship:

Golf is fun to watch again, we all love Jordan Spieth, Jason Day, Bubba Watson and to some degree Dustin Johnson.  Who knows maybe the courses had something to do with it, Chambers Bay, St. Andrews and Whistling Straits are different courses that allow for a lot of birdies which tends to add to the excitement level.  The British Open has always been different and exciting so there won’t be any problem with Royal Troon, but the U.S. Open goes to Oakmont and the PGA goes to Baltusrol.  Both are old courses with lot’s of tough par 4s and good old fashion rough.  This will add a different element, one in which bombers can’t hit it as hard as they want because these courses make it tough hitting it into the rough.  I also have seen golf change drastically in the last five years. Players are more physically fit, they work on faster hand speed and swings are now built to hit the ball farther.  Many will blame technology for Jason Day hitting 40 out of 56 drives over 300 yards.  In reality the course was hard, lots of bumps in the fairway to give balls added distance and lot’s of downhill holes in which balls go further.  One other aspect, lot’s of downwind holes.  So next year this could all end at Oakmont and Baltusrol and we can find ourselves with some really boring golf tournaments.  Who knows, maybe Spieth, Day, Bubba and Dustin will adopt and bring their games to the same levels next year and the good times will continue.

Tiger:

It’s very easy to say “stick a fork in him, he’s done”  Yes he didn’t have a very good year, we keep waiting for him to improve and he never does.  The general public loves Tiger when he is dominating but we havent’ seen that Tiger in the majors for close to six years now.  Yes Tiger hasn’t been a part of a major on the back nine on Sunday since the 2009 PGA at Hazeltine.  Other than good play there is nothing to root for Tiger since he hasn’t really been a personable player like Spieth, Day or even Rory McIlroy.  We all wonder how much longer Tiger will be able to put up with missing cuts.  We have to trust that he feels that he is getting better or he wouldn’t be doing all of this, but frankly he may be fooling nobody but himself in thinking that he can go back to even a small part of what he use to be.  Many are comparing Tiger now to Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle, two who stuck around five years past their prime when they should of retired and in a way ruined some of our thoughts on them.  Hogan, Jones and Nelson retired early, Nicklaus and Trevino did it at the perfect time, Tiger better start thinking about it.

The Buzz:

So here it is, for a good share of those in the field of the Wyndham this could be the end of the line.  In the past, this was the last week for those to make it into the FedEx Cup playoffs.  Those in the top-125 move on, while the others waited for the playoffs to finish.  Then they had five to seven event to get into the top-125 of the money list and save their Tour cards for the following year.

The system is drastically different.  The Wyndham is now the last regular tour event for 2015, so for many its a two edge sword.  Not only are they looking to finish in the top-125 and move onto the FedEx Cup playoffs, but for those that don’t finish in the top-125 they have lost their PGA Tour cards.

So what happens to those that don’t finish in the top-125?  A more expanded hell that is now called the Web.Com Tour finals.  Before it was the PGA Tour Qualifying tournament which if you made it to the final leg (there was three for the unfortunate that had gone through all three stages) it was six days of golf in which 25 cards were on the line for the 144 player field.  So if you had a bad first day or first couple of days, that was it you wouldn’t be able to recover and had to endure the Buy.Com Tour for a year.

Now the pain of qualifying is based on four events over the course of four weeks.  So in a way the torture is greatly expanded but in a way you have more chances to qualifying.  Here is how it runs.  For those that are not in the top-125 of the FedEx Cup point totals, those between 126 and 175 they get into the four tournament Web.Com Tour finals.  The events are the Hotel Fitness Championship in Fort Wayne, Ind., (Sept 10 – 13), the Small Business Connection Championship in Davidson, N.C. (Sept. 17-20), the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship in Columbus, Ohio (Sept. 24-17) and then the Web.Com Tour Championship played at the Dye Valley course at the TPC Sawgrass (Oct. 1-4).

Those between 126 and 175 will be joined by the top-75 money winners off the Web.Com Tour.  The premise is that 50 cards will be given out.  The top-25 of the Web.Com money list will receive a card.  So for those that have played the tour all year they will have a big advantage over the PGA Tour players because the PGA Tour players will have zero dollars while those on the Web.Com Tour will have their money.  But with each event having a bigger purse with the first place of $180,000 those PGA Tour regulars will be able to make up the difference quickly.

The other 25 cards will go to players who earn the most-cumulative money in the four Web.Com Tour events.  So you can see, in a way there are more chances for players. If you play bad in the first couple of events and then catch fire, you can gain a card.  The only problem is that now your pain is over five weeks, not just six days.

A lot of us miss the old PGA Tour qualifying tournament, but in a way this will be easier for players to regain their cards.  Only problem, new players won’t find a way into the final qualifying tournament and be able to have that shining moment, something that about a half dozen players a year get to do.  So to break into the PGA Tour will now be a two-year process of qualifying for the Web.Com Tour and then having to endure the Web.Com Tour finals.

So in a way this week’s event will be important for those not only getting into the top-125 but also to have some chance and get into the top-175.  For those that want to look and see what players have to do, the PGA Tour has a very good sheet with the scenarios for those in the Wyndham, who is playing this week and who isn’t.

Tournament information:

Created in 1938, the 2015 edition of the Wyndham Championship will be the 76th tournament. Initially known as the Greater Greensboro Open, the tournament has blossomed from its paltry roots. The event was the vision of the Greensboro Jaycee’s Chapter, which was but a year old when the idea was conceived. Many were in favor of the creation of a golf tournament; however, no one took steps to creating an event until, at a meeting in the summer of 1937, Joseph Bryan put up capital to back the event. The PGA Tour placed the tournament on the 1938 schedule.

If Joseph Bryan is credited with being the backer, then Sam Snead is the owner of the event. His eight victories at Greensboro, including the inaugural event, was a record for most victories by a player at one tournament until Tiger tied him in several events. The Greensboro-based tournament had been played every year except for 1943 and 1944, when the event paused because of World War II.

The tournament name held until 1988, when Kmart became the title sponsor, and the event became known as the Kmart Greater Greensboro Open.  After an eight year run, Chrysler took over in 1996 and in 2003 the Greater was dropped in favor of Chrysler Classic of Greensboro. That name held until 2006, when Daimler Chrysler pulled out as title sponsor and Wyndham Hotels & Resorts took over. The 2014 Wyndham Championship has ramifications for the FedEx Cup Championship. The Wyndham Championship is the last event in which golfers, vying for position in the playoff system, can earn points.

For 31 years between 1977 and 2007, Forest Oaks Country Club hosted the event, but it wasn’t considered “fan friendly” and the course wasn’t very memorable.  One of the reasons that Forest Oaks got the event in 1977 from Sedgefield was because the course was too short and didn’t have the room and parking to handle big crowds.  It was a big disappointment for the members when they lost the event and many had been lobbying to get it back.  With Wyndham taking over the sponsorship and having it’s offices nearby, and the membership invested $3 million dollars to renovate the course it opened the doors for the return.  When the course was reopened in 2007 to rave reviews, it was decided to change venues for 2008 and has held the event ever since.

Course information:

Between 1938 and 1976 Sedgefield held the Wyndham Championship 26 times and was considered a great old Donald Ross course.  Unfortunately the course was short and small for galleries so the event moved on.  Still the course was considered a gem and for years membership tried to lure it back.

Sedgefield founded in 1925, is located in the rolling hills of Greensboro’s Sedgefield neighborhood. The club has hosted many amateur golf tournaments as well as 32 years of the Wyndham Championship. In addition to its Donald Ross-designed golf course, Sedgefield is perhaps best known for its signature clubhouse, a Tudor-style building housed in the framework of the original Sedgefield Inn built in 1925, the Atlantic Coast Conference was founded in this building in 1953.

Couple of years ago the club entrusted North Carolina course architect Kris Spence with the job of restoring the course back to its original Donald Ross design while making adjustments to bring the course in line with the modern game.  Spence’s renovation added another 400 yards to Sedgefield, bringing its length to 7,130 yards. Par will be 70 as the 18th hole will be converted into a par 4.

Emphasis must be put on ball placement in the fairway in order to get the appropriate angle to the green. The greens at Sedgefield are very undulating and slope from back to front, with many falling off the edges into collection areas.  In 2013 Sedgefield played to a 69.383 scoring average, more than a shot under par for the field.  It ranked as the 23rd hardest of 43 courses for 2013.  Last year it played to a scoring average of 69.209 and ranked 38th out of the 48 courses for the year.

It will be an interesting scenario for the players that a Donald Ross course will be used to get players ready for next month’s Tour Championship that will be played on another Ross course at Eastlake, outside of Atlanta.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the Wyndham Championship:

Key stat for the winner:

Sedgefield is a very versatile course. Length is not critical because the course plays at about 7,127 yards, just a notch below average for a PGA Tour event. With length not being a factor, players are afforded the opportunity to use either driver or long iron off the tee. The most-critical thing for the field is to manage the slope of the course. To do that, ball control and accuracy are key.

Now this tournament was made famous by Sam Snead, who won it eight times, the PGA Tour record for the most victories by a player in a single event. Snead captured the inaugural event in 1938, and when he won it for the eighth time in 1965, he became the oldest winner in PGA Tour history at 52 years, 10 months and eight days.

Between 1949 and 1965 Snead was never higher than 8th and won $37,827 or about the same amount that the player in 28th place will win this week.  For the record, if Snead would have played all 17 events at the present purse of $5.3 million his Greensboro earnings would have been $7,786,000.  Oh Snead is the only winner in Greensboro history to defend his championship so Camilo Villegas will be looking to break that 57-year record.

Here are some more key stats to look to for this week:

  • Length is obviously not an issue so that opens things up quite a bit. Look for the winner to be someone who doesn’t like to muscle up with the driver, and just settle for using a long iron for control. Past winners of the event are some of the best iron players on tour. The likes of Sergio Garcia, Webb Simpson, Mark O’Meara, Davis Love III, and Steve Elkington have hoisted the trophy. Look for the winner to be able to manage the surroundings, as the undulations are the most difficult part of the golf course.
  • North Carolina in the summer time is rife with heat and humidity. This will be important because the bent grass greens will bake making the undulated greens even more challenging.
  • Hitting greens will be at a premium at this Donald Ross gem, just like it was last week at Atlanta Athletic Club.   Hitting lots of greens goes a long way at the Wyndham Championship.  Look for the winner to hit greens in bunches.
  • With wet weather of late, rough should be tough and hard to get out of.  The fairways will be soft so it will be harder to run into the rought.
  • Last week at the PGA, lots of low scoring on a very fast, dry course.  I can see this week someone shooting a 59 at Sedgefield. The course is really short by tour standards and you have to think that if conditions play just right that could happen.  Since the tournament moved to Sedgefield in 2008, 61 has been shot four times including once in 2012 but I just see the course very vulnerable this year.
  • Talking about the weather, the good news is that this week is going to be great with very little chance of rain for the four days of the event.

 

Who to watch for at the Wyndham Championship

Best Bets:

Webb Simpson

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T5 T11 T22 Win T8 CUT

Always plays well at Sedgefield, have to think he will contend on the weekend.

Brooks Koepka

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T38

Of all the players in the field, has to be the hottest player.

Brandt Snedeker

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T5 CUT T28 CUT T8 T5 T69 Win

Another of those players that love playing at Sedgefield, should have a good week.

Best of the rest:

Bill Haas

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T2 T20 T7 CUT T28 T10 CUT CUT CUT

Another of those that should play well here, was runner-up last year.

Hideki Matsuyama

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
CUT 15

Guy plays well on tough, tree-line courses. Look for him to play well.

Martin Kaymer

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T20

Showed signs of playing well last week and over the course of the last month, so he could continue the trend this week.

Branden Grace

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
First time playing in this event

Came close at Whistling Straits, this could be his week.

Solid contenders

Paul Casey

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T18 CUT 75 T47 T26

You would think his game would be good for Sedgefield, but he has struggle. Maybe this year will be the year.

Adam Scott

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
CUT T64

A big mystery on why his results haven’t been very good. Only playing here because he needs FedEx Cup points, it’s a great course for him because he hits lot’s of greens, but his putting is not very good. Gosh, what happens to him next year with the long putter ban?

Justin Thomas

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T78

Has played great, could this be his week?

Charl Schwartzel

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T14

The man on the bubble, he is 125th on the FedEx Cup and playing a course he should do very well at.

Long shots that could come through:

Harris English

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T10

Time for him to pull himself out of this slump, played well in his only start.

Russell Knox

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
T37

Has had a great summer, maybe this will be a good week for him.

Tiger Woods

2015 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04 ’03
First time playing in this event

I know how poorly he has played in the majors this year, but he feels that he is close (could be lying to us, wouldn’t be the first time). All I can say is that you can get 50 to 1 on a Tiger win, not a bad risk even with his terrible play this year.

Comments

  1. haven brown says:

    this course has bermuda greens now

  2. When you say Tiger should think about hanging it up, are you referring to the player who won 5 tournaments and was Player of the Year two seasons ago, then was sidelined for a year with back surgery? Just checking.

    We live in the era of social media when all people can recall is the past few weeks or months. Pretty unreal.

  3. Yes I am, Tiger is so lost it’s now sad. Also look at his 2013 season, yes he won four times but all of those wins were very inconsistent. He played well in the first two rounds and then hung on for dear life. Tiger was a shell of what he was in his prime, but he was able to keep it together because his swing was consistent and Tiger was able to putt and scramble real well. Those days are gone and the chances on him regaining them are running out. He has lost two key parts to his game, his confidence and his swing. He is inbetween swings and may be lost on that for a while.
    I would love to see Tiger regain his form, but I just don’t think it’s going to happen.

  4. He’s never going to be where he in terms of tournament performance, partially because of his age, and because the new era guys of their 20s are so good. But his game will continue to get better. His putting has flashes. Two weeks ago, after starting +3 through 4 holes, he played the next 32 at -11 and was 3 shots back at the cut. The fact that he is progressing after coming back from injury too early this year (yes 2015) leads me to believe that he’ll be back. You know how important being in-synch is for golfers, and with his driver putting him in the trees every 3 holes, it’s no wonder that his game is struggling.

    Your view is almost everyone’s view, and while I’m a significant minority, I can see through the brutally bad results that he is showing, and can focus on the flashes that tell me he’ll be back.

  5. What more can I say about Tiger shooting 64. Am I wrong in thinking that he will never win again? Who knows. The one thing we have to watch is how Tiger does over the weekend, that has been a weakness for him, even in 2013 when he won four times he played terrible over the weekend. Have mixed emotions on the round, anytime Tiger plays well it’s good for golf, just don’t know in what direction Tiger really is going at.

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