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BlogThe Barclays Preview and Picks

The Barclays

August 25th – 28th, 2016

Bethpage State Park (Black)

Farmingdale, N.Y.

Par: 71 / Yardage: 7,468

Purse: $8.5 million

with $1,530,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Jason Day

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 66 top-100 players from the latest Official World Rankings and 37 of the top 50. Nine of the top-ten players are in the field (#10 Danny Willett is not):  Those in the field include #1 Jason Day, #2 Dustin Johnson, #3 Jordan Spieth, #4 Henrik Stenson, #5 Rory McIlroy, #6 Bubba Watson, #7 Adam Scott, #8 Rickie Fowler and #9 Justin Rose.

From 11 to 25 there are 14 of the 15 with #12 Branden Grace, #13 Phil Mickelson, #14 Patrick Reed, #15 Matt Kuchar, #16 Hideki Matsuyama, #17 Louis Oosthuizen, #18 Brooks Koepka, #19 Jimmy Walker, #20 Russell Knox, #21 J.B. Holmes, #22 Jim Furyk, #23 Brandt Snedeker, #24 Zach Johnson and #25 Charl Schwartzel (#11 Sergio Garcia is missing).  Between 26 and 50 there are 14 of the 25, they are #28 Paul Casey, #29 Scott Piercy, #30 Kevin Kisner, #31 Kevin Na, #32 Bill Haas, #33 Justin Thomas, #36 Kevin Chappell, #37 Emiliano Grillo, #38 Daniel Berger, #41 William McGirt, #46 Marc Leishman, #47 Danny Lee, #48 Charley Hoffman, #50 Ryan Moore.

Last year there was 37 players from the top-50, the same as this year.

The field includes 122 of the top-125 from the FedEx Cup rankings.  Those that chose not to play are #20 Sergio Garcia, #75 Danny Willett and #87 Shane Lowry.

The field includes 24 of the top-25 players on this year’s PGA Tour money list. #19 Sergio Garcia choose not to play.

The field includes 7 past champions: Jason Day (2015), Adam Scott (2013), Dustin Johnson (2011),  Matt Kuchar (2010), Vijay Singh (2008, ’06, ’95 & ’93) and Steve Stricker (2007).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in The Barclays field is our performance chart listed by average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at The Barclays  field in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at The Barclays  field.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

**NOTE**

One thing to look for is our new GOLFstats IQ.  For those that play in fantasy golf it’s a perfect way to help you pick those players in Draft Kings and Victiv games.  You can customize the list of those in the tournaments, to look back a couple or many years of tournament stats and you can go back a couple or ten weeks prior to the tournament.  On top of that, all the stats are fully sortable to help you pick your six players, we even give you their value for the week to help you chose.

That’s GOLFstats IQ, give it a try and tell us what you think of it

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Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the The Barclays

Player Wyndham Champ. John Deere Olympics Travelers Champ. PGA Champ. Canadian Open British Open Barbasol Champ. Scottish Open WGC – Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Quicken Loans BMW Intern.
Henrik Stenson
(405.67 pts)
DNP DNP 2
(100)
DNP T7
(73.33)
DNP Win
(176)
DNP T13
(12.33)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(44)
Jason Day
(239.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP 2
(133.33)
T14
(24)
T22
(37.33)
DNP DNP T3
(45)
DNP DNP DNP
Si Woo Kim
(230 pts)
Win
(132)
DNP DNP T25
(25)
CUT
(-13.33)
T23
(18)
DNP 2
(66.67)
DNP DNP T35
(5)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Patrick Reed
(223 pts)
T22
(28)
DNP T11
(39)
T11
(39)
T13
(49.33)
DNP T12
(50.67)
DNP T10
(13.33)
52
(0)
DNP T39
(3.67)
DNP
Russell Knox
(209.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(132)
T22
(37.33)
DNP T30
(26.67)
DNP T10
(13.33)
54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP
Justin Rose
(208.67 pts)
DNP DNP Win
(132)
DNP T22
(37.33)
DNP T22
(37.33)
DNP DNP T46
(2)
DNP DNP DNP
Jimmy Walker
(193.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(176)
T14
(24)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T16
(17)
DNP DNP DNP
Matt Kuchar
(190 pts)
DNP DNP 3
(90)
T17
(33)
CUT
(-13.33)
T9
(30)
T46
(5.33)
DNP DNP T3
(45)
DNP DNP DNP
Brandt Snedeker
(188.5 pts)
T3
(90)
DNP DNP DNP T56
(0)
T5
(46.67)
T22
(37.33)
DNP DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP DNP DNP
Hideki Matsuyama
(187.33 pts)
T3
(90)
DNP DNP DNP T4
(106.67)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T42
(4)
DNP DNP DNP
Jhonattan Vegas
(181.67 pts)
DNP DNP T50
(1)
DNP T22
(37.33)
Win
(88)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP DNP T53
(0)
T44
(2)
DNP
Phil Mickelson
(179.83 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T33
(22.67)
DNP 2
(133.33)
DNP T13
(12.33)
T27
(11.5)
DNP DNP DNP
Dustin Johnson
(179.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
T2
(66.67)
T9
(60)
DNP DNP Win
(66)
DNP DNP DNP
Kevin Na
(176.17 pts)
T10
(40)
T8
(50)
DNP DNP T22
(37.33)
DNP T22
(37.33)
DNP DNP T27
(11.5)
DNP DNP DNP
Emiliano Grillo
(172.67 pts)
DNP DNP T8
(50)
DNP T13
(49.33)
T43
(4.67)
T12
(50.67)
DNP DNP T14
(18)
DNP DNP DNP
Ryan Moore
(170.33 pts)
T53
(0)
Win
(132)
DNP T17
(33)
T70
(0)
DNP T46
(5.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Robert Garrigus
(169 pts)
T22
(28)
T22
(28)
DNP T5
(70)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP DNP T29
(7)
T8
(16.67)
DNP
Daniel Summerhays
(152 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T11
(39)
3
(120)
CUT
(-6.67)
T59
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T21
(9.67)
DNP
Brooks Koepka
(149.17 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T9
(45)
T4
(106.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP WD
(-2.5)
DNP DNP DNP
Jim Furyk
(148.33 pts)
T10
(40)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
T73
(0)
13
(24.67)
T59
(0)
DNP DNP T42
(4)
DNP T21
(9.67)
DNP
Aaron Baddeley
(129 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T34
(16)
T49
(1.33)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
DNP DNP T17
(11)
T12
(12.67)
DNP
Johnson Wagner
(128 pts)
T5
(70)
T5
(70)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Jerry Kelly
(127.33 pts)
T22
(28)
CUT
(-10)
DNP 2
(100)
DNP T26
(16)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Steve Stricker
(127 pts)
DNP T52
(0)
DNP DNP T42
(10.67)
DNP 4
(106.67)
DNP T21
(9.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Ricky Barnes
(126.67 pts)
DNP T5
(70)
DNP 68
(0)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP T35
(10)
DNP DNP T59
(0)
DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the The Barclays

Player Wyndham Champ. John Deere Olympics Travelers Champ. PGA Champ. Canadian Open British Open Barbasol Champ. Scottish Open WGC – Bridgestone Barracuda Champ. Quicken Loans BMW Intern.
Bryce Molder
(-33.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T56
(0)
CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Jamie Lovemark
(-24 pts)
DNP T34
(16)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T62
(0)
DNP
Jason Bohn
(-23.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T56
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T62
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Zac Blair
(-20 pts)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP T62
(0)
CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T73
(0)
DNP DNP T61
(0)
T75
(0)
DNP
Seung-Yul Noh
(-19.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
WD
(-5)
DNP T38
(12)
DNP T59
(0)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP DNP T57
(0)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Kevin Streelman
(-17.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T12
(12.67)
DNP
Jonas Blixt
(-13 pts)
T33
(17)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T74
(0)
DNP DNP
Smylie Kaufman
(-11.83 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-13.33)
DNP CUT
(-13.33)
DNP DNP T27
(11.5)
DNP T10
(13.33)
DNP
Harold Varner III
(-11.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
T66
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP 7
(18.33)
DNP
Peter Malnati
(-9 pts)
T42
(8)
T27
(23)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-13.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

It’s the homestretch of the 2015 PGA Tour season.  After 43 events spread over the last 11 months, for many their season is over.  Guys like Padraig Harrington, Retief Goosen, Geoff Ogilvy, Ernie Els, Ian Poulter, Hunter Mahan, Nick Watney and Davis Love III to name a few

Here is a list of the top-50 from last year’s FedEx cup list that have fallen from grace, going from FedEx glory last year to out of the playoffs this year:

Player                         Last year position          This year’s standings

  • Steven Bowditch             20th                                         179th
  • Matt Jones                       33rd                                        126th
  • Pat Perez                         45th                                        222nd
  • Brendon Todd                  46th                                         212th
  • Brendon de Jonge           46th                                         156th
  • Hunter Mahan                 49th                                          183rd

On the other end of the spectrum, for 125 players they can enjoy some added glory along with putting a few more dollars in their pockets through the FedEx Cup bonus pool.

Of course, the PGA Tour will talk about how much everyone has a chance this week.  The reality of this is for players who are 100 in the rankings like Jonas Blixt to Seung-Yul Noh, who is in the 125th position, they have to run the table and win at least once and be in the top-five just to make it into the Tour Championship.  Still the points are more in their favor than the first couple of years when the rankings favored the leader.

Just look at this chart of past winners of the FedEx Cup standings, and you can see that Billy Horschel in 2014 is the highest ranked player at the start of the playoffs that won it.  Last year Jordan Spieth became the first leader going into the playoffs to win since Tiger Woods did it in 2009.

Year – FedEx winner        position going into playoffs

  • 2015 – Jordan Spieth                 1st
  • 2014 – Billy Horschel                69th
  • 2013 – Henrik Stenson              9th
  • 2012 – Brandt Snedeker           19th
  • 2011 – Bill Haas                        15th
  • 2010 – Jim Furyk                       3rd
  • 2009 – Tiger Woods                   1st
  • 2008 – Vijay Singh                      7th
  • 2007 – Tiger Woods                   1st

So the reality is that you have to be in the top-69 to win this race.  For more on the scenarios of what could happen, the PGA Tour has done a great chart to help those figure it out.

One thing for sure, the PGA Tour has the format down to a fair system and we will have a great four weeks of golf.

Now this is the PGA Tour’s take on this, I have a different opinion on all of this.

My take on the playoffs:

When FedEx Cup Playoffs were introduced in 2007, the PGA Tour had a big problem.  The season was very long, going from January through November.  After the PGA Championship, the marquee names didn’t play much until the last event in November at the Tour Championship.  The big problem PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem had, with new TV contracts he wasn’t going to get a network to do the telecasts in September, October and November, nobody wanted to buck Football.  He also had to spice up the way people look at a year for the Networks, he needed something more than player of the year and the money race.

So Finchem was looking for some way of cutting the season down so that he could put a proper period on the season before Football started.  NASCAR had a point system which got racers to a playoff system, and Finchem got FedEx to buy into the system.  It was a year long point system that players qualified for a series of four playoff events, with the top-30 going to the Tour Championship so that the “best player” of the year would be found.  Before it was the player who won the most money, Finchem just about scraped the money race and came up with a point system.

The only problem was that the PGA Tour sold this as a year-long system in which it would be just as important getting points in the first event as the last event.

Frankly in my eyes it has turned into a joke.  How can you justify players getting “valuable” FedEx Cup points in events like the Frys.com Open or the RBC Heritage or the Travelers.  It’s not important for week in, week out events.  In a way watching a players points grow was like watching grass grow, nobody including players really care during the year.

So how do you make it exciting, year round?  Right now the playoffs are four weeks in which the hottest player is usually the winner.  So let’s not make it a four-week affair.  What if instead of having four playoff events, you have a playoff event every ten weeks or so.  So after the 13 Fall and west coast events, you add up the points and have your first playoff event with between 70 and 90 players.  You then award points based on the finishes of that event.  After that playoff event, the next event rolls over to everyone with zero points and you go ten weeks or so to like Zurich in New Orleans.  Again the top point getters are in the second playoff event, with points award in that playoff event.  You then have another playoff event between the U.S. Open and British Open like at Greenbrier.  Again after the third playoff event, again everything is zero out and you go to six or seven events before you have the fourth playoff event the week before the Tour Championship.  Again points are given at this fourth playoff event, and you take all four of the playoff events, total up the points and invite the top-30 to play in your final playoff at the Tour Championship.  So instead of four straight weeks of playoffs, you stagger them over the course of the year and end it with the fourth playoff event followed by the Tour Championship.

Under this system you will see players think more about the playoff events and you will see players in more events in the week or two before a playoff.  This then places importance on the whole year.  You will probably get the same hot golfer winning at the Tour Championship, but things will be more interesting.  I have touched on the surface on this.

I love this concept, and it makes each event during the year more important in getting points.

Just my take on these very boring playoff events.

Tournament information:

This is the 50th annual Barclays. Originally dubbed the Westchester Classic, the tournament has undergone a slew of name changes over the years. Just a decade after Jack Nicklaus captured the inaugural tournament in thrilling fashion back in 1967, the tournament became the American Express Westchester Classic.

Three years later, in 1979, American Express pulled out as title sponsor and the event became known as the Manufacturers Hanover Westchester Classic. The name lasted until 1990, when Buick became the title sponsor. In 2005, Barclays took over as chief sponsor of the event.

The Barclays, usually played the week before or after the U.S. Open in June, was shifted to the middle of August to accommodate being the first event in the FedEx Cup playoffs.

The first year of the playoffs,  Westchester was used and Steve Stricker won.  Since then the Barclays has moved away from Westchester, and it looks like it will never go back. Lot’s of reasons for it not ever coming back, but most of them were because of the logistics and not because of the course itself.  The future of the Barclays is courses like Ridgewood, Plainfield, Liberty National and now Bethpage, which held the 2012 Barclays and is the home this year.  Last year it was played at Plainfield Country Club for the second time.  Future plans has Glen Oaks Club in Old Westbury, New York in 2017, mainly to get it away from the New York which will have the Presidents Cup at Liberty Nationals.  Here is a look at the sites of the Barclays, which loses Barclay’s as a sponsor and will have Northern Trust take over.

  • 2017 – Glen Oaks Club
  • 2018 – Ridgewood Country Club
  • 2019 – Liberty National Golf Club
  • 2020 – Plainfield Country Club
  • 2021 – Bethpage State Park (Black Course)
  • 2022 – Liberty National Golf Club

Course information:

  • Bethpage Black
  • Farmingdale, N.Y.
  • 7,468 yards     Par 36-35–71

In 1996, when the USGA announced the selection of Bethpage State Park’s Black Course as the site of the 2002 U.S. Open, the choice was hailed as a major breakthrough for the common man. Only two previous U.S. Open courses were not private facilites, Pebble Beach and Pinehurst No. 2.  The appeal at the time was that Bethpage would be the first “municipal” course, which means it’s a true public golf course to hold the U.S. Open.  For years St. Andrews, another true municipal course has held the British Open so it was a big deal.  In the 20 years since, Torrey Pines joined Bethpage as the two municipal courses to hold the U.S. Open.

The facilities at Bethpage consist of a state park with five courses in the middle. When the project was first considered in the early 1930s, a private club was already on the property. The club was called the Lenox Hills C.C., designed by Devereux Emmet. This would become the Green Course. At the time, three more courses would be built: the Blue, Red and Black courses. They would be built by A.W. Tillinghast.  With the advent of the Great Depression, Bethpage became a model for the work relief project. The Green, Red and Blue courses opened in August of 1935, with the Black opening the following year.

While the Black Course is considered a Tillinghast creation, it is doubtful he had anything to do with the actual building of it. Yes, he did the designs and drawings. However, some historians say that Tillinghast never spent a day at Bethpage after the drawings were completed, and the workers took the drawings and did the best they could to follow his plans.

Two unusual things about the Black Course stand out. One, it is that is a “walking only” course; golf carts are not allowed. Two, there is a sign near the first tee warning about the difficulty of the course, saying that it is a course for “highly-skilled golfers.”  This is not the norm for municipal courses which in general are much easier and appealing for high handicap golfers.

Bethpage was thought to be a regular of the USGA when they went back to it in 2009 after hosting the 2002 U.S. Open.  But that was when both Winged Foot and Shinnecock were out of favor with the USGA.  But with those relationships getting good again and future Opens being held on those courses, the need for another New York area course because unnecessary.  But with the USGA going away, the PGA of America has step into the picture and will play the PGA Championship on the course in 2019 and the Ryder Cup in 2024.

Let’s take a look at key stats that are important for those playing at the Bethpage:

This is based on the most vital stats from Bethpage, based on data from the 2012 Barclays when the course was last used on the PGA Tour and using data from all the players in the field with stats from 2016.

Bethpage is an A.W. Tillinghast on record even though many feel it is doubtful he had anything to do with the actual building of it. Yes, he did the designs and drawings. However, some historians say that Tillinghast never spent a day at Bethpage after the drawings were completed, and the workers took them and did the best they could to follow his plans.
It doesn’t matter, the course is a gem and probably the finest municipal golf course in America. Now before people jump down my throat saying, hey places like Pebble Beach, Pinehurst and Bandon Dunes are “municipal” courses because they are opened to the public, they aren’t. Municipal are courses run by a local or state government, in the case of Bethpage it’s run by the state of New York. Yes, people could say that Torrey Pines is a better course, it’s run by the city of San Diego. It’s a very scenic course and has held a U.S. Open, but for regular challenges, Bethpage is the best.
Despite being a par 70 for the U.S. Open, for the Barclays, the course will play to a par 71 as the 7th hole will be a par 5 which makes the course to par easier. It also plays an important because it means more bombers will be able to take the par 5s apart and make low scores on them.
The trick to the course is getting it in the fairway and hitting lots of greens. Since the course is “public” the greens are fairly flat and don’t have much roll in them, thus giving a poor putter a chance. You can see this in action as one of the worst all-time putters on the PGA Tour is Lucas Glover who won the U.S. Open at Bethpage in 2009. Another example is the 2012 winner Nick Watney, who is having lots of problems finishing 202 in the FedEx Cup standings and won’t be a part of it this year. He is considered a below par putter, averaging right around 130th in putting since 2012. So you can see, a poor putter can do well on this course.
Still, you have to get to the greens, and the course is filled with hazards. One is not fairway bunkers, sand in the fairway only appears on 4 holes, #6, 10, 15 and 16. The course is tightly tree-lined with rough, but since the summer has been so hot the rough won’t be full and lush as officials would have wanted it. So the course will appeal to bombers, but there are some hazards for them. Holes 6, 9, 12, 13, 14 and 18 have bend and fairways that run out so long hitters need to throttle back with possible long irons on the holes to make sure they are position for shots into the green. So there are some hazards and dangers to driving at Bethpage. Now there are bunkers around the greens, 32 of them, but they aren’t wicket like the greenside bunkers at Oakmont or even Baltusrol. But with many of the greens risen, missing them means tough pitches to the hole, this will be the challenge for the players this week. Despite this don’t think the course is a pushover, it’s so unique that the PGA of America will hold the 2019 PGA Championship and the 2014 Ryder Cup on the course. Both the PGA and the USGA set up courses harder than the PGA Tour, so that is part of the secret. Tiger had a winning score of 3 under at the 2002 U.S. Open; Lucas Glover was 4 under in 1999 while Nick Watney shot 10 under at the 2012 Barclays when the field average was 71.72 (three-quarters of a shot over par). I can see the winning score going as low as 14 under this year, many because of the hot weather before the event. Also playing in the equation will be the fact that the New York area, which has been stuck in high temperatures with high humidity will see that break this week with the summer’s best weather for the region.

So will every phase of the game be examined at Bethpage? Probably not for those playing well, I can see a lot of birdies and around a dozen players breaking par for the 72 holes.
So in looking at our four categories, our first is Strokes Gained Tee-to-Green. This is going to be the most important item and frankly, go to the top and sort through it, I would say that someone in the top-30 will win this week. Now in 2012 they didn’t have Strokes Gained Tee-to-Green, so we have to look at several stats. It ranked T-28th in driving distance for the year on the PGA Tour, it was 27th in driving accuracy and 18th in Greens hit. For the U.S. Open in 2009, it ranked 6th in driving distance, 24th in driving accuracy and 5th in greens hit. Again that greens hit becomes important, in 2012 the winner Nick Watney was T-2nd, in 2009 Lucas Glover was 4th and in 2002 Tiger Woods was 1st.
Our second stat is scrambling, lot’s of players will miss greens at Bethpage and will have to get it up and down. In the 2009 Barclays, the course ranked 13th in scrambling while Watney was T39th, Glover in 2009 was 19th and Tiger was 2nd in 2002.
Our third stat is putting inside of 10 feet, yes this will be substantial because the greens will be flat with tiny undulation. One problem for the players, the greens are poa aunna and will be bumpy in the afternoon. Still, the winner will come close to making 100% of his putts from 10 feet and in.
Out fourth category is par 5 average. I see this as being a critical stat with three par 5s this week. Look for the winner to be in the 10 under range for the week.

This is the first leg of the FedEx Cup playoffs, so those toward the bottom need to play well or sit out a month. But at Bethpage, the course will be for the taking of many of the players, and I can see some excellent scoring.  For those seeing 121 players below and wondering which one is missing, it’s Henrik Stenson who was 1 rounds short of getting “official” stats.

*Strokes Gained tee-to-green: A combination of driving distance, accuracy and greens hit this will tell you who plays the best from tee to green which will be important this week.

*Scrambling: The percent of time a player misses the green in regulation, but still makes par or better.

*Putting inside 10 feet: Very easy, counts every putt from ten feet in to see who makes the most.

*Par 5 Average: How players do on par 5s, who plays them the best.

Players from this year’s field with stats from 2016:

Click any column title in the table header to sort columns.

For the rest of the players, hit this link:

 

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at Bethpage:

A player that drives the ball long and straight and will make almost all of his putts inside 8 feet.  That is very easy to say, is there a human being that can do that?  Yes there will be a few but we won’t know it until the weekend.

Key stat for the winner:

  • The Barclay’s has always been a test of survival and maybe that’s why in the 49-year history of the event it’s 42 champions have won 64 majors.
  • Hitting greens in regulation will be paramount. The tight venue will require good ball control, which will result in hitting lots of greens. Look for the winner to hit a plethora of greens in regulation this week, that was the way Tiger Woods won at Bethpage in 2002 (53 of 72, rank 1st).
  • Putting will be an important roll this week, since the greens are flat this let’s players that are not the best in putting to do well.  Lucas Glover may be one of the best iron players on the PGA Tour but he is a very poor putter on the PGA Tour but he was able to win the 2009 U.S. Open despite all of this.

Is there any rhyme or reason for a player to win this week?

  • Wisdom says that a player with a lot of experiences will win but since this course is not a well know entity a newcomer could do well.
  • Players ranking between about 90th and 125th have extra incentive because they need a good showing to stay alive in the lucrative FedExCup, with the top 100 moving on the following week’s Deutsche Bank Championship. In 2009, Heath Slocum barely made the field at The Barclays but his victory helped him to ultimately finish eighth in the FedExCup. In 2013, Martin Laird was 95th heading into the week and lost in a playoff, eventually finishing 11th in the FedExCup. In 2014 we saw Billy Horschel begin the FedEx Cup playoffs ranked 69th and go on to win it.  So anything is possible.
  • This week is a mix of tour stars like Jordan Spieth, Jason Day, Justin Rose, Bubba Watson and Rory McIlroy with a lot of first-time winners and a lot of non-winners.  In past years winning had a lot to do with the weather, when it’s good the tour stars seem to shine but in bad weather it becomes a long shot delight.  Also in past Barclays look for those who play well with the lead, 26 of the 46 winners since 1970 have held the lead going into the final round and went on to win.  Since 1989, 16 of those 27 third round leaders have won but since leaving Westchester the third round leader has won just once, last year with Jason Day (2011 was reduce to 54 holes).
  • Lastly, the outlook for the tournament couldn’t be any better as sunny skies with temperatures hovering in the high 80s will be around all four days with very little chance of rain.  This is a change for the area which has experience high temperatures and humidity for over a month.  This will mean that Bethpage will be very fast, the fairways will have a lot of roll and the greens will be hard and tough to hold shots.

 

 

 

 

Who to watch for at the The Barclays

Best Bets:

Dustin Johnson

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T9 CUT T3 Win T9 T15 CUT

Hopefully the shock of missing the cut at the PGA Championship has worn off because he is the best player this week thanks to hitting the ball long and straight. He also finished T3rd at Bethpage in 2012.

Henrik Stenson

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
2 T38 T43 T54 CUT

Don’t be surprise to see him do what he did in 2013 when he won the FedEx Cup. That year he came to the playoffs 9th, this year he is 14th.

Jimmy Walker

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T69 CUT T54 T38 T18 T52 CUT

Look at what happened on the last A.W. Tillinghast course, he won. Walker has all of the traits it will take to win this week, hit’s it long, hits lot’s of greens and may not be the best of putters. He has never played well at the Barclays, but he never did well in the PGA Championship and won that.

Best of the rest:

Jason Day

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
Win T2 T25 T24 T13 T5 T12 T31

He hasn’t played that great this summer, but you have to think it’s only a matter of time before he plays well again.

Jordan Spieth

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
CUT T22 T19

Has spent the last couple of weeks practicing and getting ready. To many folks minds he has played terrible since losing the Masters, but I think of it as he won Colonial and did well in the summer events. I think he is one of the favorites to win the FedEx Cup, we will see if his iron play has gotten better and with some good putting he could win this week.

Justin Rose

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T16 T30 T2 T46 T6 T15 T41 T14 CUT T61

Winner of the Gold medal at the Olympics, he could do very well and have that good play carry over to this week.

Brandt Snedeker

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
CUT CUT CUT 2 T3 CUT T12 T68 CUT CUT

Was 2nd at Bethpage in 2012, he has played very well of late finishing T-5th at the Canadian Open and T-3rd at the Wyndham Championship.

Adam Scott

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
CUT T15 Win 62 T67 T9 T58 CUT T14 2 T32

Has not done much since his back to back wins in March. Still has the game and could surprise us.

Solid contenders

Matt Kuchar

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T39 T5 T19 T38 2 Win T28 CUT T35 CUT

Winner of the bronze at Rio, he could easily keep it rolling and play very well this week. The course is right up his alley and wouldn’t shock many with a win.

Hideki Matsuyama

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T13 T30

Playing well don’t be surprise to see him sneak through a back door and win.

Luke Donald

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T24 CUT T41 T10 T18 T15 T31 CUT T5 7

A good combination of playing well at the Wyndham last week and finishing T-10th at Bethpage gives us some hope for a good week.

Bubba Watson

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
3 T30 T13 T10 CUT T31 CUT T12 CUT CUT

Now on paper this should be a great tournament for him but he hasn’t shown us much and we wonder if he could get it together for this week.

Phil Mickelson

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T50 78 T6 T38 T43 CUT T52 T19 T7 T18 T16

Still have hope for a victory out of him very soon.

Long shots that could come through:

Jim Furyk

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T11 8 T6 CUT T52 T15 T12 T25 2

Normally not a longshot but is with this great field. Has played well since returning to the PGA Tour in May, only a matter of time before he wins.

Kevin Na

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
T20 T9 CUT CUT T36 T24 T31 CUT CUT CUT

Watch him, has played great the last two weeks and could win at Bethpage.

William McGirt

2016 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07 ’06 ’05 ’04
CUT T5 CUT T10 T24

Finished T-10th at Bethpage in 2012, he could surprise us this week.

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