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BlogRBC Canadian Open Preview and Picks

RBC Canadian Open

June 6th – 9th, 2019

Hamilton Golf & C.C.

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Par: 70 / Yardage: 6,967

Purse: $9.1 million

with $1,368,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Dustin Johnson

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 28 of the top 100 players and 15 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with four of the top-ten in the field: #1 Brooks Koepka, #2 Dustin Johnson, #4 Rory McIlroy and #6 Justin Thomas  Here are the other top 50 players in the field: #13 Matt Kuchar, #19 Bubba Watson, #20 Webb Simpson, #30 Sergio Garcia, #37 Keegan Bradley, #38 Alex Noren and #42 Shane Lowry.

Last year there were 11 players from the top 50 in the field

The field includes 9 of the Top 25 on this year’s FedEx Cup point list:  Those players include #1 Matt Kuchar, #2 Brooks Koepka, #4 Rory McIlroy, #5 Dustin Johnson, #14 Justin Thomas, #17 Ryan Palmer, #18 Sung Kang, #21 Scott Piercy and #23 Corey Conners..

The field includes 4 past champions: Dustin Johnson (2018), Brandt Snedeker (2013), Scott Piercy (2012) and Jim Furyk (2006 & ’07).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the RBC Canadian Open field is our performance chart listed by the average finish. One last way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at RBC Canadian Open in the last five years or check out our brand new and sortable 8-year glance at the RBC Canadian Open.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the RBC Canadian Open

Player Memorial Charles Schwab PGA Champ. Byron Nelson British Masters Wells Fargo Zurich Classic RBC Heritage Masters Texas Open WGC Dell Match Play Corales Puntacan Valspar Champ.
Brooks Koepka
(402.67 pts)
DNP DNP Win
(264)
4
(53.33)
DNP DNP T22
(18.67)
DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP
Dustin Johnson
(299 pts)
DNP DNP 2
(200)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T28
(7.33)
T2
(66.67)
DNP T40
(5)
DNP T6
(20)
Matt Kuchar
(217 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP DNP DNP 2
(33.33)
T12
(25.33)
T7
(18.33)
2
(50)
DNP DNP
Sung Kang
(188 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP 7
(110)
Win
(88)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP DNP T18
(10.67)
Scott Piercy
(170.33 pts)
DNP T19
(31)
T41
(18)
T2
(66.67)
DNP DNP T13
(24.67)
T3
(30)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Rory McIlroy
(165.17 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP T8
(33.33)
DNP DNP T21
(19.33)
DNP T9
(22.5)
DNP DNP
Matt Every
(139.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T17
(33)
DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T3
(60)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Ryan Palmer
(136.67 pts)
DNP T6
(60)
CUT
(-20)
T43
(4.67)
DNP DNP Win
(88)
T28
(7.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Shane Lowry
(129.67 pts)
DNP DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T3
(30)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T24
(13)
DNP DNP
Sergio Garcia
(128.33 pts)
DNP DNP CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T4
(53.33)
2
(66.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T5
(35)
DNP T54
(0)
Graeme McDowell
(127.67 pts)
DNP 73
(0)
T29
(42)
DNP DNP DNP T18
(21.33)
T48
(0.67)
DNP T7
(18.33)
DNP Win
(44)
T46
(1.33)
Webb Simpson
(118 pts)
DNP DNP T29
(42)
DNP DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP T16
(11.33)
T5
(46.67)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Lucas Bjerregaard
(117.33 pts)
DNP DNP T16
(68)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T21
(19.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
4
(40)
DNP DNP
Henrik Stenson
(113.5 pts)
T37
(13)
DNP T48
(4)
T20
(20)
DNP T28
(14.67)
T18
(21.33)
DNP T36
(9.33)
DNP T9
(22.5)
DNP T24
(8.67)
Brandt Snedeker
(112.67 pts)
DNP T19
(31)
T16
(68)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T48
(0.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T24
(13)
DNP T30
(6.67)
Nick Watney
(111.67 pts)
T22
(28)
T8
(50)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T31
(12.67)
T9
(30)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T37
(4.33)
Erik Van Rooyen
(100 pts)
DNP DNP T8
(100)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Mackenzie Hughes
(98.33 pts)
DNP T8
(50)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T30
(13.33)
T63
(0)
DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP T2
(33.33)
T13
(12.33)
Jimmy Walker
(97.67 pts)
DNP T19
(31)
T23
(54)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T45
(3.33)
DNP DNP T36
(9.33)
T30
(6.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Jonas Blixt
(92 pts)
DNP 5
(70)
DNP T20
(20)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T30
(6.67)
DNP T22
(9.33)
T42
(2.67)
Kyoung-Hoon Lee
(92 pts)
T37
(13)
T64
(0)
DNP T72
(0)
DNP T60
(0)
T3
(60)
T48
(0.67)
DNP T14
(12)
DNP T26
(8)
WD
(-1.67)
Jason Dufner
(88.33 pts)
T7
(55)
T40
(10)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T4
(53.33)
CUT
(-6.67)
T63
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Peter Malnati
(86.67 pts)
T17
(33)
T40
(10)
DNP T72
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T9
(30)
T16
(11.33)
DNP T23
(9)
DNP DNP T60
(0)
Brian Gay
(78.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T13
(37)
WD
(-10)
T69
(0)
DNP DNP T3
(60)
T54
(0)
DNP T77
(0)
DNP DNP T46
(1.33)
Seamus Power
(76.67 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T79
(0)
DNP T13
(24.67)
T5
(46.67)
T6
(20)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T44
(2)
CUT
(-3.33)
Austin Cook
(74.33 pts)
T27
(23)
T19
(31)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T22
(18.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T9
(15)
Corey Conners
(72.33 pts)
T65
(0)
T31
(19)
T64
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T30
(13.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
T46
(2.67)
Win
(44)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Adam Hadwin
(72 pts)
T52
(0)
DNP T29
(42)
DNP DNP T38
(8)
T13
(24.67)
T48
(0.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Cameron Tringale
(65.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T23
(18)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP T17
(11)
DNP T52
(0)
CUT
(-3.33)
Peter Uihlein
(63 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T13
(37)
DNP T5
(46.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T22
(9.33)
T65
(0)
Aaron Wise
(61 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T41
(18)
T43
(4.67)
DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP DNP 17
(22)
DNP T40
(5)
DNP DNP
Jim Furyk
(60.17 pts)
T33
(17)
T13
(37)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T23
(9)
T17
(16.5)
DNP T18
(10.67)
Kevin Tway
(58.33 pts)
DNP T19
(31)
77
(0)
T53
(0)
DNP DNP T13
(24.67)
DNP T36
(9.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Curtis Luck
(57 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T5
(46.67)
DNP DNP 80
(0)
DNP T52
(0)
T13
(12.33)
Bud Cauley
(54 pts)
T9
(45)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP T24
(17.33)
DNP T39
(3.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the RBC Canadian Open

Player Memorial Charles Schwab PGA Champ. Byron Nelson British Masters Wells Fargo Zurich Classic RBC Heritage Masters Texas Open WGC Dell Match Play Corales Puntacan Valspar Champ.
Martin Trainer
(-43.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-20)
WD
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP 66
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Rod Pampling
(-40 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Hudson Swafford
(-34.33 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
T33
(5.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Richy Werenski
(-32 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-20)
DNP DNP T38
(8)
CUT
(-6.67)
T58
(0)
DNP T61
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Scott Langley
(-30 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
T61
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Whee Kim
(-28 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T37
(8.67)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Kyle Jones
(-26.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T52
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Adam Svensson
(-24 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Anders Albertson
(-23.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T77
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Tom Lovelady
(-23.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

The Canadian Open got a great change of date, going from the week after the British Open to the week before the U.S. Open.  Now the change doesn’t show this year because the U.S. Open is on the other side of the country and the Hamilton Golf & C.C. is not a perfect place to get ready for a U.S. Open at Pebble, but I can see how this change will help the Canadian Open in future years.  In the past the Canadian Open was a must go to an event, in some people’s minds it was a step below a major.  But in 1988 it was switched to September and stayed there until it shifting to July and the week after the British Open in 2007.  This was a dead spot, even with the jet flying people from the British to Canada, nobody wanted to play the week after a major when a WGC was the next week and the PGA Championship two weeks later.  So I can see fields getting better, especially starting next year when the U.S. Open goes to courses like Winged Foot which is like the courses that hold the Canadian Open.  Talking about future venues, Hamilton will be played again in 2023 with St. George’s Golf and Country Club holding the 2020 and ’24 events.  Now nothing has been said, but it’s hoped that the 2021 or ’22 event goes back to Glen Abbey, whose future isn’t very bright considering that it’s in the hands of the courts. The company that owns it ClubLink is trying to develop on the property and replace Glen Abbey with about 3,000 homes.  The community has been fighting them tooth and nail, but it’s only a matter of time.

But the good news right now is the change of date will help this event in future years.

RBC Canadian Open

First played in 1904, only the British Open, U.S. Open, and BMW (old Western Open) are older.  To think that 109 have been played, the good news with a great sponsor of RBC, along with a list of great courses that will hold the tournament, this will turn into a more important tournament in future years.

Course information:

  • Hamilton Golf & Country Club
  • Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 6,967 yards     Par 35-35–70
  • This year’s Canadian Open moves back to Hamilton Golf & C.C., a private course just 45 minutes outside of Toronto. One of Canada’s most prestigious and historic clubs, Hamilton Golf and Country Club is one of the 10-founding clubs of the Royal Canadian Golf Association. Opened for play in October 1894, the original 12-hole course was located next to the Hamilton Jockey Club. After only one full season the club moved to a new 18-hole course at the base of the escarpment in the western part of Hamilton, then moved again in 1916, this time to its permanent home in Ancaster. The original 18 holes at the Ancaster site were designed by noted English golf course architect Harry Colt,  whose other works include the Eden course at St. Andrews, Royal Portrush, Toronto Golf Club and St. George’s CC. A third nine was added to the layout in 1975.
  • The 2003 Bell Canadian Open was played there so this will only be the fourth time that the Canadian Open has been staged at Hamilton.  The first one saw J. Douglas Edgar win by a record 16 strokes in 1919, Tommy Armour won the event in 1930 while Bob Tway beat Brad Faxon in a playoff in 2003.  Jim Furyk won in 2006 and Scott Piercy won it the last time the RBC Canadian Open was played at Hamilton in 2012.
  • Now the bad news, the area suffered a rough winter.  With ice and snow covering the ground, a chemical reaction caused damage to the greens.  They are better but won’t be perfect for this week.  For those that played the course in the 2012 RBC Canadian Open, they probably won’t recognize the course since the club has taken down over a 1,000 trees since 2012.  They did this to help the course get more sun and to bring the course back to the original Harry Colt design.
  • In looking at Hamilton one thing is certain, it’s not a power dominated course, it’s an old classic design.  Just like Colonial, nine of the holes have sharp doglegs and will be hard to keep the ball in the fairway (1, 2, 3, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15 and 18).  The 5th hole is short and can be driven, but if you don’t hit a great shot you will have problems making par.
  • So driving it straight is very important probably the reason Bob Tway, Jim Furyk and Scott Piercy are past winners of the Canadian Open held at Hamilton.  The par 3 is also very demanding and the two par 5s aren’t automatic birdie holes.  It’s important to hit lot’s of greens, but the most important element of playing well at Hamilton was putting, both Jim Furyk in 2006 and Scott Piercy in 2012 had good putting weeks.  In looking at the course stats from 2012 Hamilton was the 18th straightest course on tour and the 32nd in greens hit.  Hamilton was 37th in scrambling and putting average they were T-13th.  In putts inside ten feet, the course was 10th on tour meaning that players put well at Hamilton.

DraftKings tips

*Here are the guys that cost the most on DraftKings this week:

  • Dustin Johnson – $11,900
  • Brooks Koepka – $11,700
  • Rory McIlroy- $11,200
  • Matt Kuchar – $10,500
  • Justin Thomas – $10,000
  • Webb Simpson – $9,700
  • Sergio Garcia – $9,500
  • Scott Piercy – $9,300
  • Henrik Stenson – $9,100
  • Brandt Snedeker – $9,000

I can tell you off the bat that I don’t like the prices that DraftKings is giving us.  Yes, they are fair, I just think that they are too high and even my one great sleeper pick of Scott Piercy is too high.  They have Dustin Johnson at $11,900, this is the problem.  You get $50,000 to play with and with six picks that comes out to an average per player of $8,333.  If you pick Johnson to level it off, you have to pick someone at $4,800 and they have no one at that level.  What you can usually do is get two players over $9,000 if you’re careful, but there is no way to do this.  For a player like Johnson to be so high, he has to have a 1 in 3 chance of winning and I can’t say that for Johnson.  Now Brooks Koepka at $10,700 can be justified when you consider how well he has played but again winning isn’t really on Koepka or any of the marquee names minds.  They are looking to play good enough to boast them with confidence to Pebble.  Last month Koepka was in contention and shot 65 in the final round at the Byron Nelson to finish 4th.  He had no stress and didn’t have to use up brain cells to win the tournament which would have taken some of the edges off for the PGA Championship.  Instead, he played great over the weekend and gave himself a lot of confidence going into the PGA and went on to win.  So yes you can pick him but it’s a lot of money, I say no.  Now Rory McIlroy at $11,200 is also too much, hey he missed the cut at the Memorial and looked terrible so I’m not going to pick Rory.  As for Matt Kuchar at $10,500 I took him in my big pool last week and he missed the cut.  Normally I would say Kuchar is a good pick for this week, but at the price, I am worried and not taking him.  Justin Thomas at $10,000 is also not wise because you just don’t know about the wrist.  Sergio Garcia is $9,500 and I would say maybe on this course, but in seeing that he missed the cut at Bethpage I can’t pick him either.  So of the top-seven, I am not taking a single person.  Now Scott Piercy is $9,300 which is high for him but I like him a lot.  He won on this course in 2012 and has played well this year, so this is a good pick.  Now Henrik Stenson is high at $9,100, he has never played in the Canadian Open and only has one top-ten this year in the match play, so the answer is no to him.  We are down to Brandt Snedeker at $9,000.  He has won the Canadian Open in 2013 and was T-34th at Hamilton, shooting 66 in the final round.  For the year his play has been mixed, but good enough to say pick him.

*Players in that $7,500 to $8,900 price range, which ones are worth the money?:

So that means we have to find a lot of players in the $8,900 level or lower.  First I like Jim Furyk at $8,800, he won at Hamilton in 2006 and even though he missed the cut in 2012 I still like him.  He had a good streak that almost got him into the Masters, but since missed three cuts including the PGA Championship.  But he was T-13th at the Charles Schwab and T-33rd last week at Memorial so he is worth the pick.  Now Jason Dufner at $8,700 is a possibility, he plays well on tough courses and was T-4th at the Wells Fargo and T-7th at the Memorial.  He came out of nowhere last year to win the Memorial, he could do it again this week.  Bud Cauley is at $8,400 and a good buy.  He has come back from injury and he was T-7th last week at the Memorial.  Also like the part that he was T-4th at Hamilton in 2012 which tells us he likes the course, take him.  Ryan Palmer is $8,200 and a good buy, was T-8th last week at the Memorial and finished T-19th at Hamilton in 2012.  Now Jimmy Walker is at $7,900 and has been ok this year and played good in Canada.  Now a sleeper pick that nobody will see is Erik Van Rooyen at $7,800.  He was 2nd in Morocco and T-8th at the PGA Championship and I like his game.  Graeme McDowell at $7,600 is also worth the gamble.  He makes a fair amount of birdies and I am just thinking he will make the cut and help you.  Our token Canadian is Mackenzie Hughes at $7,500 who finished T-8th at the Colonial and played at Hamilton in 2012 and missed the cut.

*Some of the “bargains” this week at the RBC Canadian Open

Peter Uihlein is at $7,400 and his game is coming around of late, worth a try.  Boy, the pickings are slim in this category the only other pick I see is Nate Lashley at $6,700.

In looking at how poor the pickings are this may be a week to take off and save some money for the U.S. Open.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the RBC Canadian Open:

The key stat for the winner:

  • Those that have played the course before will have a slight edge but the key to the course will be for those to manage the par 4s.  There are 12 of them and they range from 337 to 481.  The 5th and the 12th are the only one’s under 400 yards.  So that means ten holes over 400 yards with five of them over 440 yards.  So if you can manage the par 4s, you will do well this week.

Here are some more key stats to look to for this week:

  • The course has many doglegs and holes that long hitters won’t have room.  So look for a lot of layups and players like Dustin and Brooks hitting irons off the tee.  Hamilton won’t have to worry about being a bombers course because you have to keep it in the fairway.
  • Greens are contoured and well bunkered which means that those that scramble will do very well.
  • Putting seems to be the key to success at Hamilton.  Those that putt well will get the nod over players that hit lots of greens.  So a good putter and scrambler will prevail this week.
  • With a field that isn’t loaded with marquee names, I would say a first-time winner is very probable.  That tends to be the trend on the PGA Tour when a new course is used, a rookie tends to win.
  • Now we tend to forget that this is the national open of Canada but it’s been a while since a Canadian has one it.  You have to go back to 1954 when Pat Fletcher won it.  Mike Weir came close to winning in 2004, only to give up a lead on the final holes and then lose a playoff to Vijay Singh.  Other than that it’s been a bit bare as Dave Barr finished T4th in 1988, while David Morland IV finished T5th in 2001.   Now Weir has always been the sentimental choice of this event, but his game is up to playing the PGA Tour and he has missed the cut his last three years.  A couple of Canadian players to watch this week, Adam Hadwin, Mackenzie Hughes, and Corey Connors.
  • The PGA Tour has been very lucky the last four or so weeks missing out on storms. Last week they played with no delays, something that is strange for the Memorial.  In looking at the weather forecast for this week is that each day will be great, with temperatures in the high 60s.
  • The biggest tip I can give you with this tournament going to a course that many haven’t seen.  Check the who’s hot list, if a player is doing well over the last six weeks, he will probably play well this week.

 

Who to watch for at the RBC Canadian Open

Best Bets:

Brooks Koepka

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
CUT T18

Have to say it’s hard not to pick him he is playing that well. Only question can he win a tournament that is not a major?

Dustin Johnson

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
Win T8 T2 CUT T2 WD

Lot’s of things work in his favor, he is a straight driver, keeps the ball in the fairway and putts well.

Scott Piercy

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T79 T25 T52 Win T6 T40

Yes in some great company, but the combination of him playing well of late (T-2nd at the Byron Nelson) and him winning at Hamilton in 2012 makes him a good choice.

Best of the rest:

Matt Kuchar

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
CUT T32 T9 T7 T4 T2 T34 CUT T4 CUT

Yes, he missed the cut at the Memorial, but he is too good to do it two times in a row and his game is too good now. Have to say he will bounce back.

Jason Dufner

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T3 T48 CUT

This guy could be the big surprise of the week, he is capable of winning this week.

Rory McIlroy

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
First time playing in this event

Another guy who missed the cut at the Memorial, it can’t happen two times in a row.

Brandt Snedeker

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T8 T5 T25 Win T34 CUT T5 T7

Game is coming around, plays well in Canada.

 

Solid contenders

Webb Simpson

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T37 T16 CUT

Loves playing these old, short courses and has a good record on this style of course.

Bud Cauley

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T49 CUT T4 T13

Played well at Hamilton in 2012, could do it again.

Jim Furyk

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T45 75 13 4 2 T9 CUT T34 T14 Win

Could lightning strike twice won in 2006 and his game is good these days.

Ryan Palmer

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T22 CUT T43 T41 T31 T19 T24 T64 T22 T3

His game has been good for the last two months.

Jimmy Walker

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T29 T14 T28 T68 T17 T46 79

This course is a lot like Baltusrol.

Long shots that could come through:

Graeme McDowell

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
T17 CUT CUT CUT T9 74

Guy has been consistent this year, he could do well on this course.

Erik Van Rooyen

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
First time playing in this event

Has never played in Canada but has done well the last couple of months.

Peter Uihlein

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
First time playing in this event

His game has come around, a bit of a streaky player.

Forget about them this week:

Justin Thomas

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
First time playing in this event

Still worried about his wrist.

Sergio Garcia

2019 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
CUT

Still worried about the way he is thinking, you never know which Sergio will show up.

Comments

  1. Micahel M says:

    Sal – at the top you have: Glen Abbey G.C……in the body of the report…..Hamilton CC? I’m assuming it’s Hamilton.

  2. Thanks fixed it

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