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BlogMasters Preview and Picks

Masters

April 8th – 11th, 2021

Augusta National G.C.

Augusta, GA

Par: 72 / Yardage: 7,475

Purse: $11.5 million (From last Novembers event)

with $2,070,000 (Last Nov.) to the winner

Defending Champion:
Dustin Johnson

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 64 of the top-100 and only 58 of the top 58 in the latest Official World Rankings:#1 Dustin Johnson, #2 Justin Thomas, #3 Jon Rahm, #4 Collin Morikawa, #5 Bryson DeChambeau, #6 Xander Schauffele, #7 Patrick Reed, #8 Tyrrell Hatton, #9 Webb Simpson, #10 Patrick Cantlay, #11 Brooks Koepka, #12 Rory McIlroy, #13 Tony Finau, #14 Viktor Hovland, #15 Daniel Berger, #16 Matthew Fitzpatrick, #17 Billy Horschel, #18 Paul Casey, #19 Sungjae Im, #20 Lee Westwood, #21 Harris English, #22 Scottie Scheffler, #23 Matthew Wolff, #24 Tommy Fleetwood, #25 Hideki Matsuyama, #26 Joaquin Niemann, #27 Ryan Palmer, #28 Louis Oosthuizen, #29 Victor Perez, #30 Cameron Smith, #31 Abraham Ancer, #32 Adam Scott, #33 Jason Kokrak, #34 Kevin Na, #35 Christiaan Bezuidenhout, #36 Kevin Kisner, #37 Max Homa, #38 Jordan Spieth, #39 Marc Leishman, #40 Sergio Garcia, #41 Justin Rose, #42 Matt Kuchar, #43 Corey Conners, #44 Shane Lowry, #45 Robert MacIntyre, #46 Will Zalatoris, #47 Carlos Ortiz, #48 Matt Wallace, #49 Siwoo Kim, #50 Brian Harman, #51 Mackenzie Hughes, #52 Jason Day, #53 Gary Woodland, #54 Bernd Wiesberger, #55 Matt Jones, #56 Brendon Todd, #57 Lanto Griffin, #58 Bubba Watson, #63 Sebastian J Munoz, #64 Ian Poulter, #68 Dylan Frittelli, #77 Danny Willett, #86 Cameron Champ and #100 Martin Laird.

In the November Masters, there were 67 of the top-100 and 43 of the top-50.

The field includes all of the top 25 on the FedEx point standings for 2021.   The highest rank played in the FedExCup list that isn’t playing in the Masters is #27, Charley Hoffman.

The field includes 18 past champions: Dustin Johnson (2020), Patrick Reed (2018), Sergio Garcia ( 2017), Danny Willett (2016), Jordan Spieth (2015), Bubba Watson (2012 & ’14), Adam Scott (2013), Charl Schwartzel (2011), Phil Mickelson (2006, ’04 & ’10), Zach Johnson (2007), Mike Weir (2003), Vijay Singh (2000), Jose Maria Olazabal (1999 & ’94), Bernhard Langer (1993 & ’85), Fred Couples (1992), Ian Woosnam (1991) Sandy Lyle (1988) and Larry Mize (1987).

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the Masters’ field is our performance chart listed by the average finish.  Another way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at the Masters in the last five years or check out our sortable 8-year glance at the Masters.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

 

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the Masters

Player Valero Texas WGC – Dell Match Play Corales Puntacana Honda Classic The Players Qatar Masters Arnold Palmer WGC-Workday Concession Puerto Rico Genesis Invit. Pebble Beach Phoenix Open Saudi Inter.
Jordan Spieth
(323.17 pts)
Win
(132)
T9
(67.5)
DNP DNP T48
(2)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP DNP T15
(11.67)
T3
(30)
T4
(26.67)
DNP
Billy Horschel
(291.33 pts)
DNP Win
(198)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T2
(100)
DNP DNP DNP T53
(0)
DNP
Scottie Scheffler
(238.33 pts)
T54
(0)
2
(150)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP 5
(70)
DNP T20
(10)
DNP T7
(18.33)
DNP
Bryson DeChambeau
(225.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP T3
(90)
DNP Win
(88)
T22
(28)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T18
(10.67)
Brian Harman
(205.67 pts)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP DNP T3
(90)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T43
(2.33)
T39
(3.67)
T36
(4.67)
DNP
Lee Westwood
(205 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP CUT
(-10)
2
(100)
DNP 2
(66.67)
T61
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T50
(0.33)
Jon Rahm
(203.67 pts)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP DNP T32
(18)
DNP T5
(23.33)
DNP T13
(12.33)
DNP
Victor Perez
(191.67 pts)
DNP 4
(120)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP T68
(0)
T52
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T4
(26.67)
Justin Thomas
(188 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP Win
(132)
DNP DNP T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T13
(12.33)
DNP
Matthew Fitzpatrick
(182 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP T10
(26.67)
T11
(39)
DNP T5
(23.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Sergio Garcia
(177.33 pts)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP DNP T32
(18)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T12
(12.67)
Matt Kuchar
(168.33 pts)
T12
(38)
3
(135)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T44
(6)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP
Paul Casey
(165.67 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
DNP T10
(26.67)
DNP DNP DNP T5
(23.33)
DNP T12
(12.67)
Corey Conners
(158.67 pts)
T14
(36)
T61
(0)
DNP DNP 7
(55)
DNP 3
(60)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T17
(11)
DNP
Max Homa
(157.67 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T10
(26.67)
T22
(28)
DNP Win
(44)
T7
(18.33)
T42
(2.67)
DNP
Matt Jones
(154 pts)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(132)
T55
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T8
(16.67)
T34
(5.33)
T30
(6.67)
DNP
Daniel Berger
(148.67 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP DNP Win
(44)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Brooks Koepka
(148 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T2
(100)
DNP T38
(4)
DNP Win
(44)
DNP
Sungjae Im
(147.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP T8
(50)
T17
(33)
DNP T21
(19.33)
T28
(22)
DNP DNP DNP T17
(11)
DNP
Viktor Hovland
(146 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T49
(0.67)
T2
(100)
DNP T5
(23.33)
DNP DNP T6
(20)
Jason Kokrak
(144.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP T8
(33.33)
T9
(45)
DNP T32
(6)
DNP DNP T41
(3)
Collin Morikawa
(143.33 pts)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP T41
(9)
DNP DNP Win
(132)
DNP T43
(2.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Will Zalatoris
(139.33 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP 21
(29)
DNP T10
(26.67)
T22
(28)
DNP T15
(11.67)
T55
(0)
T17
(11)
DNP
Tommy Fleetwood
(135.67 pts)
DNP T5
(105)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T10
(26.67)
T44
(6)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T26
(8)
Cameron Smith
(131.67 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP T17
(33)
DNP DNP T11
(39)
DNP 4
(26.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Abraham Ancer
(131.67 pts)
T23
(27)
T18
(48)
DNP DNP T22
(28)
DNP DNP T18
(32)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T53
(0)
Matt Wallace
(124.33 pts)
3
(90)
T28
(33)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Rory McIlroy
(118.67 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T10
(26.67)
T6
(60)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T13
(12.33)
DNP
Joaquin Niemann
(118.33 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP T25
(25)
T29
(21)
DNP DNP T28
(22)
DNP T43
(2.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Ryan Palmer
(118.17 pts)
T17
(33)
17
(49.5)
DNP DNP T17
(33)
DNP DNP T54
(0)
DNP DNP DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP
Tony Finau
(115.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T28
(33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP 14
(36)
DNP 2
(33.33)
DNP DNP T2
(33.33)
Patrick Reed
(99.33 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP T22
(28)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T9
(45)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T66
(0)
Dustin Johnson
(95.67 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP T48
(2)
DNP DNP T54
(0)
DNP T8
(16.67)
DNP DNP Win
(44)
Xander Schauffele
(94 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T39
(11)
DNP T15
(11.67)
DNP T2
(33.33)
DNP
Jason Day
(86.67 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP T31
(12.67)
T18
(32)
DNP DNP T7
(18.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Lanto Griffin
(86.33 pts)
T34
(16)
T61
(0)
DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP T21
(19.33)
T22
(28)
DNP T26
(8)
DNP DNP DNP
Webb Simpson
(85.67 pts)
DNP T28
(33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T6
(60)
DNP DNP DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP
Ian Poulter
(84.17 pts)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T26
(16)
DNP T35
(10)
DNP DNP DNP T18
(10.67)
Mackenzie Hughes
(83.5 pts)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP T36
(14)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T44
(6)
DNP T32
(6)
DNP DNP DNP
Louis Oosthuizen
(82 pts)
DNP T61
(0)
DNP DNP T41
(9)
DNP DNP T6
(60)
DNP DNP DNP T11
(13)
DNP
C.T. Pan
(80 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T3
(90)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T20
(10)
65
(0)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Patrick Cantlay
(79.67 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T15
(11.67)
T3
(30)
DNP DNP
Shane Lowry
(78.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP T36
(14)
8
(50)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T48
(2)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T29
(7)
Hideki Matsuyama
(77.67 pts)
T30
(20)
T42
(12)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T18
(21.33)
T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T42
(2.67)
DNP
Robert MacIntyre
(73.83 pts)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T36
(9.33)
T61
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T29
(7)
Dylan Frittelli
(72.17 pts)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP CUT
(-10)
T22
(28)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Brendon Todd
(65 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP T35
(15)
DNP T57
(0)
T18
(32)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T22
(9.33)
DNP
Kevin Na
(64.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP WD
(-5)
DNP T43
(4.67)
T11
(39)
DNP T38
(4)
DNP DNP T21
(9.67)
Christiaan Bezuidenhout
(63.67 pts)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP T41
(9)
DNP 7
(36.67)
T32
(18)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T53
(0)
Bubba Watson
(63.5 pts)
DNP T9
(67.5)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T54
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T22
(9.33)
DNP
Sebastian Munoz
(62.67 pts)
T9
(45)
T61
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T49
(0.67)
T22
(28)
DNP T43
(2.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Si Woo Kim
(62.33 pts)
T23
(27)
T56
(0)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP WD
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
T50
(0.33)
DNP
Carlos Ortiz
(60.33 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP
Tyrrell Hatton
(57.33 pts)
DNP T56
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T21
(19.33)
T22
(28)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T6
(20)
Kevin Kisner
(56.33 pts)
DNP T18
(48)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T36
(9.33)
T41
(9)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the Masters

Player Valero Texas WGC – Dell Match Play Corales Puntacana Honda Classic The Players Qatar Masters Arnold Palmer WGC-Workday Concession Puerto Rico Genesis Invit. Pebble Beach Phoenix Open Saudi Inter.
Henrik Stenson
(-40 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
Jim Herman
(-23.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T53
(0)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP
Brian Gay
(-20.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T46
(4)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T60
(0)
T34
(5.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Charl Schwartzel
(-20 pts)
T69
(0)
DNP DNP T53
(0)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T62
(0)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Jimmy Walker
(-20 pts)
T59
(0)
DNP DNP T58
(0)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Vijay Singh
(-10 pts)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Cameron Champ
(-2 pts)
T34
(16)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
T48
(2)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Ty Strafaci
(-1.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP WD
(-1.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Francesco Molinari
(0 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP T8
(16.67)
59
(0)
DNP DNP
Bernd Wiesberger
(4.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T42
(12)
DNP DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP T31
(12.67)
T59
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T53
(0)
Robert Streb
(13.67 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T13
(37)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Stewart Cink
(14.33 pts)
DNP DNP DNP T19
(31)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
T58
(0)
DNP
Martin Laird
(18 pts)
T30
(20)
DNP DNP DNP T69
(0)
DNP T43
(4.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Harris English
(24.67 pts)
DNP T42
(12)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T26
(16)
66
(0)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Phil Mickelson
(26.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP T25
(25)
T35
(15)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T53
(0)

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz:

So after a two-year wait, the Masters is finally back in its April date.  Not saying the Masters played in November was terrible, it wasn’t.  But as we found out, Augusta National doesn’t have the same bite in November as it has in April.  Unfortunately, I am a victim of the COVID-19 restrictions and am missing my second straight Masters, but in reading and watching Golf Channel am getting the feeling the players feel the course is the way it should be, firm and fast.

One more added advantage is there will be people watching, it’s probably not many, but still, we will get some noise from those in attendance, which will be nicer than in November.  One other thing that is back is the eruption of blooming flora as the Azaleas are in full bloom.  The rich colors of Augusta should be back and nice to see.  It’s too bad that they haven’t found a way to transmit the rich smells of spring that is always around during Masters week.  Hoping that this will be the last time I miss the Masters and hopefully return next year.

The field of 88 looks a lot like it was last year.  65 players from last year’s Masters are in the field.  There are only three amateurs in the field, the last time only three played was in 1998.  There are only six Masters rookies Joe Long, Robert MacIntyre, Carlos Oritz, Charles Osborne, Tyler Strafaci, and Will Zalatoris.  There have never been that few in the history of the Masters, 7 was the record in 1938, ’39 & ’42.  We are used to the fact that all winners of the Masters are always invited back to play in the tournament. This year Sandy Lyle, Mike Weir, Bernhard Langer, Larry Mize, Ian Woosnam, Jose Maria Olazabal, Phil Mickelson, and Vijay Singh are all over 50 and playing this week.  But a couple of notables aren’t playing this week.  First, Tiger Woods won’t be playing, and frankly, with the seriousness of his injury, I would think a goal is to play in next year’s Masters.  Tiger is not able to make it to Augusta for this year’s champion dinner.  Many players have talked or text with Tiger, and they all say the same, Tiger is bummed out not being at Augusta, not playing in practice rounds with his friends, and most of all, missing the Tuesday Night dinner.

Rickie

One other notable person absent is Rickie Fowler, who has played in the last nine Masters, but the fact that he had played in 41 straight majors dating back to the 2010 British Open has to be something that hurts Fowler.  Last week Fowler had his best finish of the year, a T-17th at the Valero Texas Open, but his poor play has put him in a pickle.  Fowler got into the top-50 of the World Rankings at the 2010 Memorial and had been in the top-50 until the November Masters. He was 48th, and the last time he was in the top-50.  When he missed the cut at the Mayakoba, he dropped to 52nd, and when he finished the year, 53rd meant that he didn’t qualify for the Masters.  He wasn’t able to play good enough to get back up, and if anything, his problem is worst as he will spend this week at home and 95th in the World Rankings.  With that, he won’t be able to play in any WGC events, and unless the U.S. Open and British Open change their list of who gets to play, Fowler will probably have to qualify to play in both.  We saw a similar thing happen to Ian Poulter a few years ago when he got injured. Still, the dirty little secret is if you don’t win a major, you better stay inside the top-50 of the World Rankings, or a big door closes, which prevents you from playing in eight or nine of the biggest tournaments in Golf.

Brooks

Have to say I am shocked that Brooks Koepka is playing this week.  Koepka had surgery in California on his right knee on March 16 to deal with a kneecap dislocation and ligament damage. He told ESPN’s Bob Harig that the injury occurred while with family in Florida approximately 10 days earlier. Koepka said he slipped, and the injury required his kneecap being put back into place.  According to Harig, Koepka said he started hitting balls seven days out of surgery.  Now along with hitting balls, he said that he does seven-plus hours of rehab every day, not only on the knee but the neck. He was hitting balls at Riviera C.C. in Los Angeles, where he was rehabbing, and said he walked and played nine holes a couple of times last week.  Koepka showed up to Augusta on Sunday afternoon and played holes 1, 2, 8, and 9.  He told a small number of reporters, “If I knew I was going to finish second, I wouldn’t have shown up,” Koepka said. “So, I feel like I can win.”  Of course, you have to take him seriously, but I don’t plan to wager a single dollar on Brooks when it comes to your dollars.  Yes, he is the healthiest player on the PGA Tour, but playing Augusta is a grin, and I just don’t think he can win or content.  Yes, I know the old golfer wise tale on “beware of the sick golfer,” but you have to be able to utilize every part of your body, and frankly, I don’t think Brooks will be able to do that.

Father Rahm

So for the past month, Jon Rahm has said that no matter where he was, no matter what tournament it was or if he was leading the Masters on Sunday, if the call came that his wife Kelley was going to have the couples, first child, he would answer the call.  Well, the call came last Saturday when Kelley delivered the couple’s  son, which they called “Kepa.”  So with that out of the way and the Masters this week, Rahm will be able to play without the fear of having to leave prematurely.  For a lot of betters, Jon Rahm is their man.  He has finished in the top ten the last three years, 4th in 2018, T-9th in 2019, and T-7th in November.  Many feel his game is perfect for Augusta. Yes, I think he has to worry about his putter and his temper.  For 2021 Rahm has done just about everything right except for winning.  In 11 starts, he has seven top-ten finishes, including a T-2nd at Zozo Championship@Sherwood, T-5th at his last start at the Match Play, losing in the quarterfinals Scottie Scheffler.  But to cut to the chase, yes, I think that one day Rahm could be a winner at Augusta National.  I just don’t think it’s going to be this week.  I do believe he will be in the mix over the weekend, but for some odd reason winning on the PGA Tour seems to be hard for Rahm.  Yes, he has 11 wins around the world, with five coming on the PGA Tour.  Last year Rahm won twice on great courses at the Memorial and BMW Championship at Olympia Fields.  Still, I think something is missing, I can’t tell you what it is, but something is missing to bring him to the level that Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas, or Rory McIlroy have achieved.  But at the same time, Rahm is close, and it wouldn’t surprise me if he wins, but don’t expect that to happen.

Jordan

Guess I don’t have to write it and can save myself ten minutes. We all know that Jordan Spieth is back and that this could be an excellent week for him.  Since winning the British Open in 2017, Spieth has struggled with his game.  A lot of experts gave their take, with many of them saying he needed to clean house.  Many people believed that he needed to either change coaches, change caddies, change management companies to even changing the people around him, even going as far as saying he needed to get a new dog.

But Jordan didn’t do any of that, Jordan worked hard with his same swing coach, Cameron McCormick, who has worked with Jordan since he was a junior golfer.  Now Spieth did go and speak with Butch Harmon. Many wrote that Harmon was going to be Spieth’s new coach.  I know that Butch is retired and is not taking on any players on a full-time basis.  Yes, Butch will speak with players. He may even go to the range with someone and watch him swing.  He did this last year with Brooks Koepka, they worked for a bit, but that didn’t mean working with Brooks.  The same with Jordan, Butch got together with Jordan, and they talked and knowing Butch, got Jordan in a better frame of mind so that he went back to his coach, played golf with his same caddie Michael Greller and is still with Jay Danzi, his agent that is with William Morris Endeavor Agency.

But the point is, for some reason, that Jordan hasn’t told anyone yet. Spieth finished T-46th in the November Masters, his worst finish at Augusta, and then disappeared.  Spieth didn’t reappear for two and a half months, and at the Farmers Insurance Open, shot 69-75 and missed the cut.  What was different about the event, he shot 69 on the easy North course and when he made an eagle on the sixth hole was four under.  I remember seeing that and wondering if that was a good sign for Spieth.  But just like that, Spieth made bogey on four of his last 12 holes, and his 144 total just missed the cut.  The following week Spieth shot 67-67 and then fired a 61 to take the lead at the Waste Management Phoenix Open.  He had a tough final round shooting 72 and falling into a T-4th, but it was his first top-five finish since his T-3rd at the PGA Championship in 2019, almost two years. The next week at Pebble, he finished T-3rd, he stumbled over the weekend, shooting 71-70 and was leading after the 2nd and 3rd rounds.  At the Genesis the next week, he struggled again over the weekend to finish T-15th.  He struggled in the final rounds at the Arnold Palmer, finishing T-4th and then T-48th at the Players Championship but still was showing he could play well.  He lost to Matt Kuchar at the Match Play in the round of 16 but then found glory and a return to the winners’ circle at the Valero Texas Open.

The good part of the Valero Texas Open, Spieth was solid for 72 holes.  He made 24 birdies and only 6 bogeys.  He did everything right, hit lots of fairways and greens, and took only 98 putts.  But what Spieth showed us all is that he is ready to win again, and I have to say I like him a lot this week.  His record at Augusta National is unbelievable, forget the last two starts, but he was T-2nd in his first Masters in 2014, won in 2015, was runner-up again in 2016, T-11th in 2017 3rd in 2018.  In the span of those five years, Spieth was 39 under par, and nobody played better than him.  Yes, Patrick, Sergio, Danny Willett, and Bubba Watson won those years he didn’t, but Spieth was in contention each of those years and played great.

So have to say that Spieth is my favorite this week, I think he will win and believe he will be awesome.  Many will say that it’s impossible to win a major the week after winning on the PGA Tour.  That is false, 11 times a player won a major after winning on the PGA Tour, as this list shows:

  • Rory McIlroy: Won WGC Bridgestone Invitational followed by the 2014 PGA Championship
  • Tiger Woods: Won WGC Bridgestone Invitational followed by the 2007 PGA Championship
  • Phil Mickelson: Won BellSouth Classic followed by the 2006 Masters Tournament
  • Sandy Lyle: Won Greater Greensboro Open followed by the 1988 Masters Tournament
  • Lee Trevino: Won the Canadian Open followed by the 1971 British Open
  • Art Wall: Won the Azalea Open followed by the 1959 Masters Tournament
  • *Sam Snead: Won the Greater Greensboro Open followed by the 1949 Masters Tournament
  • *Ben Hogan: Won the Winnipeg Open followed by the 1946 PGA Championship
  • *Byron Nelson: Won the Chicago Victory Open followed by the 1945 PGA Championship
  • Ralph Guldahl: Won the Greater Greensboro Open followed by the 1939 Masters Tournament
  • *Henry Picard: Won the Scranton Open followed by the 1939 PGA Championship
  • *Won their major championship as the next tournament played on the schedule, not back-to-back weeks.

So you can see this was done by Rory six years ago.  It’s been accomplished five times at the Masters, the last in 2006 by Phil Mickelson.

Do we have to worry about guys like Dustin, Rory, and Xander who play poorly?

One of the things that stick out, no matter how poorly your playing, many players who have played well at the Masters continue to play well.  A perfect example of this is Jordan Speith, in 2018, he was struggling with his game but found it to finish 3rd at the Masters.  After that, he only finished once in the top ten, a T-9th at the British Open.  So yes, many players do find their games at Augusta but look at Spieth’s record in 2019 and 2020.  He had terrible years, and when he showed up at Augusta, he finished T-21st in 2019  end T-46th last November.  Could this happen to defending Champion Dustin Johnson?  He has played terribly in his previous three starts, so is this a sign?  Not really in Dustin’s world.  Dustin has always been up and down on the PGA Tour, but over the last couple of years, he has found some magic to make sure he plays well in the majors.  But look back to 2019, after finishing 2nd at the PGA Championship, his game completely fell apart, and he finished T-35th at the U.S. Open and T-51st at the British Open.  People didn’t realize that Johnson had problems with his left knee, which required surgery.  Often, these players don’t tell us of injuries that linger, and that was the case back then.  So the question to ask now, is Dustin healthy now?  Good question and we have to go with the fact that he is healthy, and if that is the case, Dustin will find a way to get into contention.

As for Rory, he is looking and searching for something.  We saw the same with Jordan, he got lost for over three years and played terribly, Rory is having the same problem.  Now he has spent the last two weeks working with new coach Pete Cowen.  Despite saying he is still going to work with Michael Bannon, I have to say it’s Rory and Cowen right now.  Now, will they show some good results this week?  Who knows, I have to say Rory plays well at Augusta, and he knows how to win, so don’t be surprised if we see an excellent Rory this week.  I don’t expect that to happen; I think Rory should be good by next month’s PGA Championship.  Guess we will all see.

Now, what about Xander Schauffele?  He played great on the west coast, finishing T-5th at the Sentary TofC, was T-2nd at the Farmers and Phoenix, and T15th at the Genesis.  Then he finished T-39th at the WGC-Workday, missed the cut at the Players, and didn’t make it out of group play at the Match Play.  So is this a sign that Xander isn’t playing well?  I don’t think so.  Have to remember that Xander is just 27.  He was born in San Diego and went to college in San Diego.  He lives in Las Vegas, but it’s essential to look at his record.  Before this year, he had only played four times in Florida.  Yes, in one of those starts, he was T-2nd at the 2018 Players.  But as we know, sometimes TPC Sawgrass plays differently than most Florida courses.  I think that Xander’s game is not suited for Florida play, and I believe that is why his poor record of late. I just don’t think these courses suited his game.  I believe that Augusta is perfect for Xander and his game.  I think that he will have an outstanding record at the Masters, and it wouldn’t surprise me to see him win this week.  I believe we need to forget what Xander has done in his last three starts and feel that this week will be different.  I think Xander will get a top-ten this week.

So will Bryson surprise us this year?

Boy, that is probably one of the biggest things that any Masters fan thinks of.  For the golf fans, they would say that Bryson would dominate Augusta National.  Yes, on paper, he should overwhelm the course, it’s surprising what his record is.  In four starts, his best finish is T-21st, when he played as an amateur.  In 12 Masters rounds, he has been in the 60s twice, shot a first-round 66 in 2019 and 69 in the third round last November.  So what does this mean?  Maybe Augusta is too hard for Bryson.  As an example of what I am saying, look at John Daly’s record at Augusta.  His first start in 1992, he finished T-19th.  In his second start in 1993, he was T-3rd, and everyone said that Daly is perfect for taking Augusta apart.  That never happened.  In his last ten starts, his best finish was T-29th in 1996.  In those ten years playing 32 rounds, he broke 70 just once, a 69 in 1995.  But the point of all this, John was never able to conquer Augusta National and, despite being the longest driver in the game, failed every time he played it.  So does this give any hint on Bryson and if he can play well at Augusta?  DeChambeau is ten times smarter than John Daly and will go into his prep scientifically.  I bet he has studied Augusta National more than any other player.  But at the end of the day, we have seen that a lot of Bryson is hit and miss.  Yes, he was able to win a U.S. Open Yes, he could win at the Arnold Palmer.  But at the end of the day, he just had an incredible week.  I think a lot of this is hit and miss for Bryson.  Tiger Woods gave us one of the remarkable things that no manner how he felt or how he was doing, Tiger found a way to win even if things weren’t going his way.  I don’t see that in Bryson. I don’t think that Bryson can succeed unless he is entirely in the groove.  How he gets there, I don’t know, but it’s a significant weakness of Bryson.  The problem with many players on the PGA Tour is that they make so much money that it’s easy not to play okay week in and week out.

What about the Masters’ rookies? Could Fuzzy’s record be in danger?  Of the field of 88, there are just 6 Masters rookies, the lowest of all time.  Want to make an easy bet? I don’t see one Masters rookie crack the top-20 this week.

So is there anyone else?  Of course, how about past Masters winners Adam Scott and Patrick Reed? These guys can get hot and be in contention.  But I would not place a dime on any of them. They haven’t shown from the last two months, yes Reed won in San Diego but hasn’t played well since.  There is also Webb Simpson, Tyrrell Hatton, and Tommy Fleetwood.  Off the bat, I say no to Fleetwood, who has struggled since the break.  As for Hatton, he has played great the last six months. He won the BMW PGA Championship in September but did you know he missed the cut in the PGA Championship, U.S. Open, Masters, and the Players Championship.  Those four are his only missed cuts since September of 2019.  So I say no to Hatton.  As for Simpson, he has struggled a bit since his win at the Heritage.  Yes, he was T-10th at the Masters in November, but I don’t like him this week.

Some say Hideki Matsuyama could win, yes he has the most splendid tee to green game of anyone, but he slips on and around the greens, so I don’t think he can win.  But the long shot of the longshots could be Jason Day.  He has been hampered with back and neck problems, and yes, he is a ticking time-bomb.  Every time you pick him, you have to hold your breath because anything could happen.  An example of that was Day having to withdraw going into the CJ Cup’s final round while he was in contention. At Houston, Day was in contention and was in the final group but struggle, shooting 71 to drop down to T-7th.  Day plays well at Augusta and can win, but last November, he missed the cut, don’t expect much.

One last person to watch is Matt Kuchar, the game looked great at the Match Play, and he was T-12th at Valero Texas Open.  Kuchar has a T-3rd at the Masters in 2012, a T-4th in 2017, and a T-5th in 2014.  Watch Kuchar think he will be the surprise of the week.

So buckle up and get ready for a wild week, the Masters will be exciting again.

Things you need to know about the Masters

This week will be the 85th edition of the Masters. It has been played every year, except between 1943 and 1945, when the war suspended the championship.  It has been played at Augusta National every year, the only major played on the same course each year.

The Masters was conceived by Bobby Jones, who had always dreamed of having a U.S. Open played on Augusta National.  But with the hot summers in June, Jones approached the USGA with the idea of playing the Open at Augusta in April, but the USGA turned him down.  So Jones and Clifford Roberts decided to hold their annual event beginning in 1934.  Roberts proposed that the event be called the Masters’ Tournament, but Jones objected, thinking it was too presumptuous.  The name Augusta National Invitation Tournament was adopted, and that title was used for five years until 1939 when Jones relented, and the name was officially changed.

Course information:
  • August National Golf Club
  • August, S.C.
  • 7,475 yards     Par 36-36–72

While playing championship golf, Bobby Jones had always hoped that he would be able to build a championship golf course near his Atlanta home one day.  Upon his retirement after the 1930 U.S. Amateur, Jones set out to complete his dream.  In the 1920s, he met New York banker Clifford Roberts who helped Jones with his vision. After looking at several places, they both decided on Augusta, Ga., as the site provided the best weather in the winter months.  They scouted the area for a piece of land that, according to Jones, plans would utilize the natural shape and slope of the property to build the course.  Jones didn’t want a venue that relied on severe rough as a hazard and hoped that he could find a piece of property that would have a stream running through so that he could build several holes around it for water hazards.  He also wanted to create a championship course that would be playable for the average golfer, one that would use mounds and slopes as hazards instead of sand bunkers.

Also helping Jones and Roberts in their search were Thomas Barrett Jr. He knew of a piece of land in Augusta that he thought would be perfect for Jones’ dream course.  He recommended a piece of property called Fruitlands Nursery.  The land consisted of 365 acres that were once an indigo plantation the family bought in 1857.  The man was Louis Mathieu Edouard Berckmans, who was a horticulturist by hobby.  Along with his son Julius Alphonse, an agronomist and horticulturist by profession, they formed a business in 1858 to import trees and plants from various countries.  It would be the first commercial nursery in the south, and they called it Fruitland Nursery. Even though Berchmans died in 1883, the business flourished. A great variety of flowering plants and trees, including a long double row of magnolias, were planted before the Civil War, and today they serve as the club’s entrance were on the property.  But Prosper’s claim to fame was that he popularized a plant called the azalea.

Upon Prosper’s death in 1910, the business stop operation, and the heirs looked for a buyer.  That buyer came around in late 1930 when Tom Barrett first showed Jones Berchman’s nursery.  Upon seeing the property from what is now the practice putting green, Jones knew he had the perfect land for an ideal golf course.  He told Roberts and Barrett that he thought the ground had been lying there all these years waiting for someone to come along and lay a golf course on it.

An option was taken on the property for $70,000, and it was decided to establish a national membership for the club, and Jones proposed Augusta National would be an appropriate name. Jones also agreed in the planning stage he wanted Dr. Alister Mackenzie of Scotland to serve as the course architect since the pair held similar views. Before coming to Augusta, Mackenzie had designed two courses in California – Pasatiempo and Cypress Point.  Jones played those courses after failing in the first round of the 1929 U.S. Amateur and fell in love with the courses and MacKenzie’s design.  So that was the main reason he got MacKenzie to help him.

Jones and Mackenzie completed the plans, and the construction started in July of 1931. Unfortunately, after the construction work was completed, Mackenzie died before Augusta National was entirely covered with grass. The course was finished and opened in December 1932 with a limited amount of member play. A formal opening took place in January of 1933.

Since the course opened, it has been changed several times in the 87 years.  In 1934 the tournament nines were different and were changed for the 1935 event.  Also, the grasses have changed over the years between bent and bermudagrass, Today Augusta National’s tees and fairways are Bermuda grass, but they are overseeded each fall with ryegrass.  The greens are bentgrass that gives them their tremendous speed and smoothness.

The average green size at Augusta is 6,150 square feet, which is about the PGA Tour average. Water comes into play on five holes on the backside, and there are only 43 bunkers.

The scoring average of the November Masters was 71.75, which makes it the 12th hardest course on the PGA Tour in 2021 (despite it historically being called the 2020 Masters, it was played in the 2021 PGA Tour season, so far, 30 courses have been played) In 2019 Augusta had a very mild week with a lack of wind as the course played to a 71.87 average, the first time Augusta played under par for the year since 1992.  Before 2019 Augusta has played hard over the last couple of years, in 2018, it played to a 72.93 average and was the 7th hardest course of the year. In 2017 it played at 73.89 and was the 2nd hardest course on the PGA Tour.  The previous year the scoring average was 74.42 making Augusta National the 3rd hardest course to score on in 2016. In 2015 Augusta was the 13th toughest course with a 72.54 average. In 2014 it was the second hardest course on the PGA Tour with a scoring average of 73.946, close to two shots over par around. In 2013 Augusta National was the 4th hardest course on the PGA Tour, playing to a 73.412 average playing 1.412 stroke under par.

For the 2019 Masters, the 5th hole was lengthened.  The land purchase that they made many years ago allowed Augusta National to shut down Berkman’s Road, which the old 5th tee was up against.  So they were able to move the tee back 30 yards and now make the 5th hole an absolute monster.  Look at the drastic increase in par numbers for the 5th hole for 2019, it played to a 4.336 scoring average and was the most challenging hole during the 2019 Masters.

For a more comprehensive look at the course, look at this course overview done by Masters.Com

Let’s take a look at vital stats that are important for those playing at Augusta National.

This is based on the most important stats for Augusta National, based on data from last November’s Masters, and using data from all the players in the field with stats from 2021. What we do is take their rank for each stat and then add up the four categories.
The Masters seem fresh in our minds with Dustin Johnson winning. That was because it was a short time, only five months since the Masters was last played in November. Yes, it was unconventional but couldn’t be helped as COVID-19 made it impossible to hold the Masters last April. We saw that a November Masters just isn’t the same as played in April. The grass in November was different, the course wasn’t as firm and fast. The weather wasn’t the same as they didn’t have much wind in November. The scoring average of the November Masters was 71.75 which makes it the 12th hardest course on the PGA Tour in 2021 (despite it historically being called the 2020 Masters it was played in the 2021 PGA Tour season, so far 30 courses have been played). Even more relevant, it was only the third Masters in which the scoring average was below par and the lowest scoring average beating out the 71.87 field average in 2019, ranking the course the 16th hardest on the PGA Tour. When played in 2019 it was the first time that Augusta played under par for a year since 1992. The reason for it playing so low, not only wet conditions but the final round was moved up almost four hours to avoid really bad weather. At the same time officials set up the course easier, just in case the weather came in which it didn’t, so that was the reason for it being easy. Have to say we won’t see that happening this year, of course, the weather could be favorable, but I doubt that the course will ever play that easy as it has the last two times it has been played. In 2018 the scoring average was 72.93, just about a shot over its 72 par. It was the 7th hardest course on the PGA Tour. The reason for it playing almost a full shot harder in 2017 was because of the weather, lack of wind, and manageable rain on Saturday that soften the course up and made it play easier. In 2017 the scoring average was 73.89 making it the 2nd hardest course to score on that year. It’s also important to see why the weather played a factor in 2017, The weather was near perfect but the winds did blow the first two days between 20 to 25 mph, then decreased to 4 to 8 mph for the weekend. The year before 2016 the scoring average was 74.42 again because winds were between 10 and 15 mph each of the four days. Now the year before that in 2015 with good weather but very little wind the course played a lot easier to a scoring average of 72.54 and it ranked the 14th hardest course that year. In looking at the weather for Augusta I can see another round of weather playing a part in the championship. Thursday will be ok, but they are calling for scattered Thunderstorms on Friday and Saturday, with showers in the morning on Friday, so maybe the course will play easier. Also, each day will see winds below 10 mph, which is what brings out the teeth in Augusta the wind and without, along with soft conditions and soft greens will allow players to make more birdies.

Now one thing that we have to look at is the claim that Augusta is great for long hitters. That is in part true, hitting it long does have its advantage especially on Augusta’s par 5s. Dustin Johnson proved this November when he was 6th in driving distance on the measured holes with a 306.7 average. Where Johnson was able to shine was on the par 5s, he was 11 under and only one player was better than him. Johnson took advantage of his length as he hit 60 greens in regulation, the best in the field. Now showing players that aren’t as long as Johnson, in 2018 and in 2017 both winners Patrick Reed and Sergio Garcia showed their advantage as they both ranked 6th in driving distance and played the par 5s in 7 under for Garcia and 13 under for Reed. But in looking at the past champions, it’s mixed with long hitters and short. A perfect example was in 2019 Tiger Woods ranked 44th in driving distance, the highest of champions since Jordan Spieth in 2015. Also in 2016 and in 2015. Danny Willett ranked 32nd in driving distance while in 2015 Jordan Spieth ranked 52nd. But look at the top-ten for the week, in November of 2020 five in the top ten were in the top-ten in driving distance, in 2019 only 3, while in 2018 only 4, while in 2017 only 3 out of 10 while in 2016, 5 out of 14 while in 2015 only one of the 11 were ranked in the top-ten in distance, showing that there is more to Augusta than people think.

One thing in looking at the stats, Augusta National doesn’t utilize stroke gain stats which we have been using more of so we have to go back to the old fashion stats. So in looking at the stats for Augusta National, one thing is obvious, the course caters to those that hit lots of greens, can scramble well, can avoid three-putts, and play well on the par 5s. So these are the four stats we pick for this week’s key course stats.

In looking at Augusta National in 2019 (sorry no stats for November), the course ranked 19th in greens in regulation (61.45). This has been a very consistent number for the last decade. As for importance, winner Tiger Woods ranked 1st, one of 8 players to lead that category while winning the Masters. But the previous year it was totally different as Patrick Reed ranked 21st which is a dramatic withdrawal because it was the 3rd highest rank of the last 23 Masters champions going back to 1997. If you look at those winners, 16 of the 23 are in the top-five like 2017 champion Sergia Garcia who ranked T-2nd. So if only 6 of the 23 are outside the top ten, you have to say that hitting greens is very important in winning the Masters. Last November Dustin Johnson did lead in greens in regulation hitting 60 of the 72, again showing that if you hit a lot of greens you will do well.

Our next category is scrambling and in 2019 the course ranked 11th while Tiger Woods was T-50th (because he hit so many greens). We do know that in November Dustin Johnson was 4th in Scrambling. In 2018 Augusta was 5th on tour while Reed was T-16th. In three-putt avoidance Augusta, the course was 6th hardest on tour while Tiger was T-22nd (only had two three-putts). In November Dustin Johnson was T-5th (he had one three-putt all week). In 2018 it played 5th hardest on Tour while Reed only had two three-putts for the entire week and ranked T-13th. Our last category is par 5, now for the average field, the Par 5 average in 2019 was 4.58 and was T-33rd on tour. For the week, Tiger was 8 under for the week which ranked T-27th. In 2018, Augusta was 4.70 and it was T-17th on tour. Reed was 13 under for the week which is the key to how he won. You look at the history of the Masters, the best is 15 under by four different players and there were only five different players at 14 under so you can see that 13 under by Reed was a milestone, so playing the par 5s was very important in Reed’s victory. Since 1997 every winner has been under par on the par 5s except for Danny Willett who played them in even par in 2016. But if you average out the winners in the last 22 years, they average 9 under so you can see the importance of playing the par 5s well for the week.

So let’s take a more careful look at how the last five champions became victorious. In November Dustin Johnson did nothing wrong, it was probably the best overall display ever seen at the Masters. Of course, this claim does have an asterisk next to it being played in November. That does make sense when you see the scores. What Augusta National prides itself on the course didn’t have the same bite it normally has. In November 43 players were under par, and two of its biggest records fell. The first was the low 72 hole score, Dustin Johnson became the first player in Masters history to break the 270 marks as he shot 20 under, 268. Of course, records are meant to be broken, but the one record that probably stings the most is for the first time in Masters history someone shot four sub-60 rounds. What makes the record being broken even tougher to swallow is that the record wasn’t accomplished by the winner, runner-up Cameron Smith will go into the record books with his rounds of 67-68-69-69. In total, the Master’s statistician was busy as 40 Masters’ records were broken and 14 were tied. So we can see that hopefully, the move back to April will slow this down considerably. Now back to our roll call of recent winnings, 2019 Tiger did it with his ironwork, he hit 58 of 72 greens to lead the field. This helped him to make 22 birdies which were 2nd best.
Now in 2018, Reed did it with his putter, he not only had the least amount of putts but also was the best in one-putts with 38. But playing the par 5s in 13 under put him over the top.
In 2017 Sergio Garcia won it with his ball-striking, he was 2nd in fairways hit and T-2nd in greens hit. This allowed him to miss the rare putt here and there, but still enough for the win.
In 2016 Danny Willett was T-6th in greens in regulation, he was 1st in scrambling, T-2nd in three-putt avoidance, and 54th in par 5 average.
How about 2015 for Jordan Spieth. He ranked 2nd in Greens in Regulation, hitting 75% of his greens. He was T-10th in scrambling, T22nd in three-putt avoidance, and T-4th in Par 5 Scoring. One other important item that won’t be on this list but you should have in the back of your mind, making lots of birdies, in 2015 Spieth led that stat making 28 birdies for the week while Willett was T-16th making just 13 for the week.

Again if a person can hit a lot of greens and scramble well on the ones he misses and make a good share of putts, especially in the 4 to 10 foot range he is a can’t miss to not only contend, but possibly winning.

*Greens in Regulation: Stat is a great barometer on how good players manage their games around Augusta National. Every year the players that hit lots of greens do well.

*Scrambling: So which course is tough to get it up and down on holes players miss the greens. Since all of the areas around the greens are mowed short and are left with really hard shots to get it close, scrambling is important. You are not going to be perfect so you have to make sure you can make pars from some tough places

*Three putt avoidance: Augusta has the toughest greens in the world to putt on. They only average 6,486 square feet so they aren’t big or small, but they are sloppy and you can be faced with a lot of ten-foot lag putts. So when you are 30 or 40 feet away it’s really hard to get up and down in two putts and is important.

*Par 5 scoring: This is the one place long hitters due have an advantage on, the par 5s. Three of the four are within reach of the longest hitters and depending on how Augusta sets up the 8th hole, that could be easy or hard. But to win it’s important to do well on the Par 5s.

Players from this year’s field with stats from 2021 with 76 of the 88 players having stats. One other thing, the Masters is not part of the PGA Tours shotlink program so you won’t see stats like Strokes Gained this week:

Click any column title in the table header to sort columns.

To link to the stats of 76 players in the field

 

DraftKings tips

Of the 88 in the field, 82 have played at least once at Augusta National in the Masters.

*Here are the players with the most under par totals at the Masters since 2010:
  • Jordan Spieth is 43 under in 28 rounds, playing 7 years
  • Dustin Johnson is 36 under in 34 rounds, playing 9 years
  • Justin Rose is 35 under in 38 rounds, playing 10 years
  • Lee Westwood is 30 under in 36 rounds, playing 9 years
  • Rory McIlroy is 29 under in 42 rounds, playing 11 years
  • Jon Rahm is 28 under in 16 rounds, playing 4 years
  • Adam Scott is 22 under in 44 rounds, playing 11 years
  • Jason Day is 20 under in 35 rounds, playing 10 years
  • Tony Finau is 19 under in 12 rounds, playing 3 years
  • Brooks Koepka is 18 under in 20 rounds, playing 5 years
  • Matt Kuchar is 18 under in 42 rounds, playing 11 years
  • Phil Mickelson is 17 under in 40 rounds, playing 11 years
  • Sungjae Im is 15 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Justin Thomas is 12 under in 20 rounds, playing 5 years
  • Hideki Matsuyama is 11 under in 34 rounds, playing 9 years
  • Xander Schauffele is 11 under in 12 rounds, playing 3 years
  • C.T. Pan is 10 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Abraham Ancer is 8 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Cameron Smith is 7 under in 16 rounds, playing 4 years
  • Ian Poulter is 7 under in 38 rounds, playing 10 years
  • Cameron Champ is 6 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Scottie Scheffler is 6 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Sebastian Munoz is 6 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Bubba Watson is 5 under in 38 rounds, playing 10 years
  • Corey Conners is 4 under in 10 rounds, playing 3 years
  • Dylan Frittelli is 4 under in 6 rounds, playing 2 years
  • Tommy Fleetwood is 4 under in 14 rounds, playing 4 years
  • Patrick Cantlay is 3 under in 14 rounds, playing 4 years
  • Viktor Hovland is 3 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Christiaan Bezuidenhout is 1 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Collin Morikawa is even par in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Max Homa is 1 under in 2 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Patrick Reed is 1 under in 24 rounds, playing 7 years
  • Victor Perez is 1 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
  • Bryson DeChambeau is 2 under in 16 rounds, playing 4 years
  • Michael Thompson is 2 under in 4 rounds, playing 1 year
*Here are the ones with the best under par totals averaging it per years played (2 or more starts)
  • Jon Rahm is -28 under, playing 4 years (-7.0)
  • Tony Finau is -19 under, playing 3 years (-6.3)
  • Jordan Spieth is -43 under, playing 7 years (-6.1)
  • Dustin Johnson is -36 under, playing 9 years (-4.0)
  • Xander Schauffele is -11 under, playing 3 years (-3.7)
  • Brooks Koepka is -18 under, playing 5 years (-3.6)
  • Justin Rose is -35 under, playing 10 years (-3.5)
  • Lee Westwood is -30 under, playing 9 years (-3.3)
  • Rory McIlroy is -29 under, playing 11 years (-2.6)
  • Justin Thomas is -12 under, playing 5 years (-2.4)
  • Adam Scott is -22 under, playing 11 years (-2.0)
  • Jason Day is -20 under, playing 10 years (-2.0)
  • Dylan Frittelli is -4 under, playing 2 years (-2.0)
  • Cameron Smith is -7 under, playing 4 years (-1.8)
  • Matt Kuchar is -18 under, playing 11 years (-1.6)
  • Phil Mickelson is -17 under, playing 11 years (-1.5)
  • Corey Conners is -4 under, playing 3 years (-1.3)
  • Hideki Matsuyama is -11 under, playing 9 years (-1.2)
  • Tommy Fleetwood is -4 under, playing 4 years (-1.0)
  • Patrick Cantlay is -3 under, playing 4 years (-0.8)
  • Ian Poulter is -7 under, playing 10 years (-0.7)
  • Bubba Watson is -5 under, playing 10 years (-0.5)
  • Patrick Reed is 1 under, playing 7 years (0.1)
  • Louis Oosthuizen is 3 under, playing 11 years (0.3)
  • Bryson DeChambeau is 2 under, playing 4 years (0.5)
  • Paul Casey is 7 under, playing 9 years (0.8)
  • Marc Leishman is 7 under, playing 8 years (0.9)
  • Webb Simpson is 8 under, playing 9 years (0.9)

Historical ParBreakers

Here is a look at those playing this week and who has made the most eagles and birdies:

 

So it makes sense that the top players on this list are guys that will make lot’s of points this week

*Here are the guys that cost the most on DraftKings this week:
  • Dustin Johnson – $11,500
  • Jon Rahm – $11,000
  • Bryce DeChambeau – $10,800
  • Justin Thomas – $10,600
  • Rory McIlroy – $10,200
  • Xander Schauffele – $10,000
  • Patrick Cantlay – $9,800
  • Collin Morikawa – $9,600
  • Jordan Spieth – $9,400
  • Patrick Reed – $9,300
  • Brooks Koepka – $9,200
  • Tony Finau – $9,100
  • Webb Simpson – $9,000

Have to say that the Masters could be one of the hardest events to pick.  If you look at the 13 names above, 9 of them are great choices with half of them being slam dunks to finish in the top-five.  So you have to choose well, in those below $8,400 and once you get in the below $7,500 category it’s very, very hard to pick.

I look at these prices, and my first thought is that they are more than fair.  The last thing you hate to see is a couple of guys in the $11,000 and a bunch in the $10,000 range that are overpriced, but that isn’t the case.  Maybe it because the field is smaller, of course, there has to be a scale based on the number of players in the field.  So with the Master’s field at just 88, maybe this is the reason.

Another thing, one of the differences in the Masters.  Only 30 guys have a real chance of doing well, so you are limited in picks, so maybe that is why the prices are lower.  No matter we have to pick six great choices.  Before we start, the cost of the million dollars first place is still $10, so it gives you an option of picking more teams.  One thing that is important, with only 88 players in the field and the top-50 and ties making the cut you better pick six guys that are around for four rounds.  This is the most important thing you have to do, you could pick five superstars but that one crappy pick that missed the cut could cost you a lot of money.

Dustin Johnson at $11,500 makes a lot of sense, he is the defending champion, he won in Saudi Arabia, he is the number one player in the world.  But when you have to pick six great guys, the cost of $11,500 is a big ask.  Remember this, there aren’t many good picks under $7,500 so if you risk anyone over 10,000 that puts terrible limits on the rest of your picks.  So yes Dustin is a good pick to finish in the top-ten, but unless he wins or finishes 2nd, you have spent a lot of money.  So if you think Dustin is going to win, pick him.  If not, don’t risk the money.  The same with Jon Rahm at $11,000 and Bryce DeChambeau at $10,800.  Lots of money taken from your bottom line you better get a win.  In the case of DeChambeau, I am sorry but he is a very poor pick.  Now Justin Thomas at $10,600 is a good pick.  First of all, because I think Thomas can win and if he doesn’t, see him in the top-five.  Rory McIlroy at $10,200 is a risk, think there are better choices so take a pass on him. I like Xander Schauffele, but not at $10,000.  Again lots of money but feel he can deliver for you.  Patrick Cantlay at $9,800 is a person we haven’t talked about, do I think he will play well yes.  The price is more reasonable, but still he needs to deliver a top-five finish for it to be worthwhile.  Collin Morikawa at $9,600 is the same boat, many think he will do well, I have some doubts because of his putting, but he putted well in his WGC-Workday Concession win so he can find a way to master the greens at Augusta National.  Now we get to my big choice in this price category and that is Jordan Spieth at $9,400.  The price is great, I think he will play great and if he is your only choice in this price range, you can take a lot of others in the 8,000 range.  If he is the only one in this price, you can work to make sure all six of your picks make the cut.  I can say this easily, the next three picks Patrick Reed at $9,300, Brooks Koepka at $9,200 and Tony Finau at $9,100 is a big no.  Reed I don’t think is playing well, Brooks Koepka is too banged up to take him for 72 holes.  Yes, he may be ok, but I am not going to worry for four days wondering if he will withdraw or have some problem.  As for Tony Finau, he is in a big funk right now, I don’t think the Masters will get him out of it.  Webb Simpson is $9,000 and I just don’t think he will pay off, even at that price.

Here is our new feature in which we help you decide which guys make the cut the most in a tournament.  The importance of picking six players that play 72 holes is vital in playing well in Draftkings, and this list will help.  It’s a look going back to the 2010 Masters on who has made the most cuts.  Of course, those who make a lot of cuts and are priced low are very helpful.  To get on this list, you have to make at least three Masters starts:

Adam Scott made 11 cuts in 11 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,600.

Bernd Wiesberger made 5 cuts in 5 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,400.

Brooks Koepka made 5 cuts in 5 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $9,200.

Bryson DeChambeau made 4 cuts in 4 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $10,800.

Cameron Smith made 4 cuts in 4 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,200.

Daniel Berger made 3 cuts in 3 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,500.

Jimmy Walker made 7 cuts in 7 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,200.

Jon Rahm made 4 cuts in 4 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $11,000.

Jordan Spieth made 7 cuts in 7 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $9,400.

Justin Thomas made 5 cuts in 5 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $10,600.

Lee Westwood made 9 cuts in 9 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,800.

Tony Finau made 3 cuts in 3 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $9,100.

Xander Schauffele made 3 cuts in 3 starts for a 100.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $10,000.

Matt Kuchar made 10 cuts in 11 starts for a 90.9%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,800.

Rory McIlroy made 10 cuts in 11 starts for a 90.9%.  His DraftKings cost is $10,200.

Bubba Watson made 9 cuts in 10 starts for a 90.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,800.

Ian Poulter made 9 cuts in 10 starts for a 90.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,800.

Justin Rose made 9 cuts in 10 starts for a 90.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,200.

Dustin Johnson made 8 cuts in 9 starts for a 88.9%.  His DraftKings cost is $11,500.

Hideki Matsuyama made 8 cuts in 9 starts for a 88.9%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,300.

Matthew Fitzpatrick made 5 cuts in 6 starts for a 88.9%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,100.

Phil Mickelson made 9 cuts in 11 starts for a 81.8%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,600.

Jason Day made 8 cuts in 10 starts for a 80.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,500.

Kevin Kisner made 4 cuts in 5 starts for a 80.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,700.

Patrick Cantlay made 3 cuts in 4 starts for a 75.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $9,800.

Si Woo Kim made 3 cuts in 4 starts for a 75.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,700.

Tommy Fleetwood made 3 cuts in 4 starts for a 75.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $8,000.

Louis Oosthuizen made 8 cuts in 11 starts for a 72.7%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,500.

Patrick Reed made 5 cuts in 7 starts for a 71.4%.  His DraftKings cost is $9,300.

Fred Couples made 7 cuts in 10 starts for a 70.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $6,100.

Sergio Garcia made 7 cuts in 10 starts for a 70.0%.  His DraftKings cost is $7,900.

(Those that I like are in bold)

*Players in that $7,500 to $8,900 price range, which ones are worth the money?:

Lee Westwood is a great pick at $8,800 because he makes a lot of Masters cuts, in 19 starts has played 72 holes in 16 of them, and hasn’t missed a cut since 2006.  He isn’t going to win, but think he can get you a lot of points and possibly a top-15 finish.  Sungjae Im at $8,600 is a great pick, he was T-2nd in November and despite a poor west coast swing, his game has come alive in the last month.  Daniel Berger at $8,500 is good, yes he doesn’t have a great Masters record but after getting over his injury was T-9th at the Players and did ok in the Match Play.  We talked about Scottie Scheffler and at $8,400 is a great choice, think he will give us a top-ten this week.  Matthew Fitzpatrick at $8,100 is good because he has been solid in 2021 and even though his Masters’ record is ok, he has made a lot of Master’s cuts.  Sergio Garcia at $7,900 should be on everyone’s list.  He probably won’t win, but feel he can give us a top-ten and surprise a lot of us.  The same with Paul Casey at $7,700 he will make the cut and will get a lot of points.

Are there any “Bargains” out there?

The big problem of taking those high price guys like Dustin, Bryce, and Justin is there aren’t many low price guys to pick.  Abraham Ancer at $7,400 which is a good pick, he was T-13th last November and played well in Florida.  Billy Horschel at $7,200 is a stupid price, I understand he hasn’t played great at the Masters but after winning the Match Play have to like him this week.  Victor Perez at $7,000 is a good pick, he was T-46th in November but you like how well he has played since Saudi Arabia where he finished T-4th.  His last two starts have been good, T-9th at the Players and 4th at the Match Play.  Now the best pick for everyone is Matt Kuchar at $6,800, we think he has found his game and he has played well at Augusta, he is easy and should be your first pick.  Also, like Brian Harman at $6,800.  He isn’t a great pick like Kuchar, but still feel he can surprise a lot of people  Hard to believe that they have priced Ryan Palmer at $6,500.  How they figured this out is beyond me, he was 10th in the 2011 Masters, and even though he hasn’t played since finishing T-33rd in 2015 for 2021 he has three top-tens and hasn’t missed a cut since the U.S. Open so put him along with Matt Kuchar as great picks.  Last but we can’t forget to bring this up Bernhard Langer is $6,100 and I like him because in his last eight Masters starts has made six cuts including the last three years.  Remember, Langer is 63-years-old

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the Masters:

The key stat for the winner:
  • There are a few things that all winners at the Masters have in common.  First, its precise ball striking, like a Ben Hogan, length and power like Tiger Woods, deft touch with a putter on the steeply contoured greens like a Ben Crenshaw, and the mind and wisdom of a Jack Nicklaus.  All of these are what it takes to win the Masters.
  • Precise ball hitting is a must. With steeply contoured greens you have to position shots to the green in an area that you will set up an easy putt. That’s why players like Nick Faldo and Ben Hogan have five titles. If you look at the champions of the Masters, a poor putter usually doesn’t win.  Being able to avoid three putts is essential.
  • Now, Zach Johnson had six three-putts in 2007 and Bubba Watson in 2012 with four which put a dent in our theory about three-putts.  In looking further back in history, both Vijay Singh in 2000 and Tiger Woods in 2001 had more in the year they won the Masters than the previous seven champions of the 1990s put together.  That doesn’t mean that we will have a new trend. I will still bet that the winner this year has the least number of three-putts of anyone else in the field.  In November Dustin Johnson only had one three-putt.  In 2019 Tiger Woods had two in his win.
  • To show you how theories don’t work continually, look at the argument that says you have to hit it long to win at Augusta.  Yes, Tiger, Phil, and Vijay hit the ball long, but past champions like Mike Weir, Jose Maria Olazabal, Mark O’Meara, and Ben Crenshaw could be the shortest hitters on the PGA Tour.  Gosh look at Jordan Spieth in 2015, he ranked 52nd in driving distance at Augusta in his winning year.  No matter what, length is significant, just look at Tiger Woods’ victory in 1997. Being able to reach par-5s with wedges is a considerable advantage over players hitting into the greens with long irons and woods.  But again, theories don’t sometimes work at the Masters. Look at Zach Johnson in 2007. He lay up on all the par 5s and played them in 11 under par.  With dry, firm conditions this year brings in shorter hitters and gives them a chance.
  • Stats are great, but in reality, they don’t mean much when it comes to picking a winner at the Masters.  Since 1993 the only real favorite to win the Masters was Tiger Woods who won it in 1997, 2001, 2002, 2005 & 2019, and Phil Mickelson in 2004, 2006, and 2010.  How many folks placed a bet on 2019 winner Tiger Woods, or the year before with Patrick Reed or 2016 champion Danny Willett? I would say not many people. Still, players like Sergio Garcia in 2017, Jordan Spieth in 2015, Bubba Watson in 2014, and Adam Scott winning in 2013 weren’t a big surprise. But nobody would have thought that Bubba Watson would win in 2012, it was a big surprise for Charl Schwartzel in 2011, Angel Cabrera winning it in 2009, Trevor Immelman winning it in 2008 and Zach Johnson winning it in 2007.  Still, in the folklore of Masters champions, some surprise champions include Mike Weir who won in 2003, and Vijay Singh in 2000.  Even more prominent surprise winners have been Jose Maria Olazabal, Mark O’Meara, Bernhard Langer, and Ben Crenshaw, who came from out of the blue to win.  Still, one thing is certain; you need to have a track record to win at Augusta.  The last time a non-winner from the PGA or European Tour won was back in 1948 when Claude Harmon, father of Butch, won his first and only individual title on the PGA Tour at the Masters.  As the old saying goes, records are meant to be broken and who knows, maybe a non-winner will surprise us this week, but it’s doubtful.  So let’s see who could possibly be a “surprise winner” this year.  My first choice is Scottie Scheffler who has never won on the PGA Tour.
  • I can say this, look at the top 30 or 40 players off the world rankings.  We hear it all the time how the best players seem to win majors.  If you go off the world rankings, Ben Curtis was 396 when he won the British Open in 2003, and Shaun Micheel was 169 when he won the 2003 PGA Championship.  At the Masters you won’t find that kind of a winner, since 1988 there have been only two Masters champions not in the top-50, #56 Zach Johnson in 2007 and #69 Angel Cabrera in 2009.  Last November Dustin Johnson was #1 and in 2019 Tiger Woods was 12th going into the Masters, in 2018 Patrick Reed was 24th in the rankings, in 2017 Sergio Garcia was 11th, in 2016 Danny Willett was ranked 12th going into the Masters while Jordan Spieth in 2015 was 4th going into the Masters.  In the 34 years of the world rankings, the average Masters champion ranked 14th.  We’ve seen five #1s win and overall 19 of the 32 winners were in the top-ten the week before their victory.  So you can expect someone who is high up the world rankings to win this week.
  • Last, experience and wisdom are important, that’s why Jack Nicklaus has six titles. The last player to win the Masters in his first start is Fuzzy Zoeller, who did it back in 1979.  As I said earlier, there are 6 first-timers this year, and it’s a stretch seeing one of them winning.  Experience is always important at the Masters so look for a winner being someone with a lot of experience.

Who to watch for at the Masters

Best Bets:

Jordan Spieth

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T46 T21 3 T11 T2 Win T2

He has to be the favorite, has the best overall record at the Masters and when he is on his game, is tough to beat. His game seemed to peak last week in Texas, just have to think he has enough in the tank to go another week.

Justin Thomas

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
4 T12 T17 T22 T39

Showed so much form at the Players Championship, he is good in big tournaments and I can see him winning.

Xander Schauffele

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T17 T2 T50

Have been waiting months to say I think this kid has a great shot at winning at the Masters, his game is geared up for the course and it’s challenges.

Best of the rest:

Jon Rahm

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T7 T9 4 T27

With the birth of his son, that has taken a lot of burden off of his back. Should be able to appreciate what a good night’s sleep is about and will enjoy it this week. Has the game to win at Augusta, but does he have the heart, that is the question.

Scottie Scheffler

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T19

Never won and this would be a great place to get your first victory on. Has shown us a lot in the last couple of weeks, yes he can win at the Masters.

Sergio Garcia

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT CUT Win T34 T17 CUT T8 T12 T35 T45 T38

Has not played well in the majors since winning the Masters. But see that going away, has shown signs for months now of a really good game, but his secret will be putting it together for 72 holes.

Paul Casey

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T38 CUT T15 6 T4 T6 CUT T38 CUT T20

Always thought his game was perfect for Augusta, putting has been a problem in past years. Been playing well think he is ready to surprise a few folks.

Matt Kuchar

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT T12 T28 T4 T24 T46 T5 T8 T3 T27 T24

Could he, that is the question. But has shown a really good game the last couple of weeks, think his has found his mojo.

Solid contenders

Dustin Johnson

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
Win T2 T10 T4 T6 CUT T13 T38 T38 T30

Have to wonder if his game is ready, it’s been a bit shabby of late. We all know how great he is and we have seen him win after a tough stretch, so you never can count him out.

Rory McIlroy

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T5 T21 T5 T7 T10 4 T8 T25 T40 T15 CUT T20

His game has been getting worst over the course of the last few months. Says it’s due to chasing longer drives, he has been working with a different teacher, Pete Cowen the last two weeks we will see if he is getting it right again.

Patrick Cantlay

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T17 T9 CUT T47

Won’t be on many folks radar screen, yes he has the game to win at Augusta.

Collin Morikawa

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T44

I think his game is perfect from tee to green for Augusta, but still he is not a good putter and in most cases, poor putting doesn’t cut it in the Masters.

Matthew Fitzpatrick

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T46 T21 T38 32 T7 CUT

Many think that he has the game and is a notch below what it will take to win. Still he could surprise many.

Billy Horschel

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T38 T56 CUT T17 CUT T37

His Match Play victory woke up a lot of people, has done good on the big staging winning the FedExCup.

Long shots that could come through:

Sungjae Im

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T2

Showed last November that his game is ready for the big time, he has the game to win the Masters.

Abraham Ancer

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T13

Another long shot that is close to winning, if he goes crazy this week he can win.

Victor Perez

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T46

He has played well and can produce low numbers at Augusta

Can’t see it for these players:

Brooks Koepka

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T7 T2 T11 T21 T33

For the last couple of years have taught that he would one day be a champion at the Masters. But it’s not going to happen this year, sorry but Augusta is a tough course to walk and when you have legs that have had surgery in the last month, have to say it’s not a good fix. I would bet on him not making it 72 holes.

Bryson DeChambeau

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T34 T29 T38 T21

Sorry know he can rip it a mile and overpower Augusta, but I think there are too many places that the course will beat Bryson into the ground.

Tony Finau

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T38 T5 T10

His game seems lost right now.

Comments

  1. tmoore@goldenocala.com says

    Sal,
    I’d like to hear your thoughts on Cameron Smith for this week. Solid track record at Augusta and has been playing well as of late. I think he is my sleeper.

  2. tony.lessel@gmail.com says

    Ditto!

  3. So the topic is why I hardly mentioned Cameron Smith. Yes, he was T-2nd in November and also was T-5th at the Masters in 2018, so you may think I am being disrespectful to him.
    In a way I am, first of all, he has all the right stats to do well, is great on the par 5s, avoids three-putts, is 27th in scrambling and 97th in greens hit. For the year had has four top-ten finishes so why don’t I like him?

    Frankly, you can only talk and put in a certain amount of players. As I said in my preview, only about 30 players can win the Masters, and honestly Smith 31st on that list. His lack of wins is a problem for me, yes the PGA Tour credits him with two, but one was the New Orleans team event which I personally don’t count.

    There is only a finite amount of players you can, talk about, pick and I choose to leave Smith off the list. I realize everyone is looking for that “big surprise” player, the next Danny Willett, but I don’t think Smith is that guy. Again could be wrong, but to answer your question I thought for a minute or two on Smith and didn’t want to include him with the others I talked about.

  4. I’m sticking with my original picks from earlier in the week with Spieth, JT and Rory. I know that if I swap out McIlroy for someone else he’ll end up winning so I have learned to just still to my guns. Enjoy the action despite once again not being on the grounds at Augusta.

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