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BlogShriners Preview and Picks

Shriners Hospitals for Children Open

October 7th – 10th, 2021

TPC Summerlin

Las Vegas, NV

Par: 71 / Yardage: 7,255

Purse: $7 million

with $1,260,000 to the winner

Defending Champion:
Martin Laird

by Sal Johnson

Founder, Chief Data Officer, GOLFstats

E-mail me at:
sal@golfstats.com

This week’s field includes:

The field includes 49 of the top 100 and 26 of the top 50 in the latest Official World Rankings, with three top-ten players in the field.  Those top-50 players are #8 Louis Oosthuizen, #9 Brooks Koepka, #11 Harris English, #12 Abraham Ancer, #14 Viktor Hovland, #18 Sam Burns, #19 Hideki Matsuyama, #21 Patrick Reed, #22 Scottie Scheffler, #24 Webb Simpson, #25 Paul Casey,  #28 Jason Kokrak, #29 Sungjae Im, #30 Joaquin Niemann, #31 Will Zalatoris, #33 Corey Conners, #36 Kevin Kisner, #38 Ryan Palmer, #40 Marc Leishman, #42 Adam Scott, #44  Siwoo Kim, #46 Stewart Cink, #47 Matthew Wolff, #48 Brian Harman, #49 Garrick Higgo and #50 Ian Poulter

Last year there were 44 top-100 players and 22 out of the top-50.

The field includes 20 of the Top 25 on this year’s FedEx point standings.  #1 Sam Burns, #3 Maverick McNealy, #4 Nick Watney, #5 Cameron Young, #6 Mito Pereira, #8 Si Woo Kim, #9 Marc Leishman, #9 Talor Gooch, #11 Will Zalatoris, #13 Hayden Buckley, #13 Henrik Norlander, #13 Trey Mullinax, #13 Andrew Landry, #17 Cameron Tringale, #18 Nate Lashley, #19 Sahith Theegala, #20 Hideki Matsuyama, #20 Scott Stallings, #23 Seth Reeves and #25 Scott Piercy.

The field includes 2 past champions: Martin Laird (2021 & 2009) and Webb Simpson (2014).  Kevin Na withdrew late Tuesday.

A perfect way for fantasy golfers to check on the past performance of all the players in the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open field is our performance chart listed by the average finish. One last way to check who is the best is through a special formula worked out in Golfstats that gives us the best average performances at Shriners Hospitals for Children Open in the last five years or check out our brand new and sortable 8-year glance at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open.

A good cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmakers in England.

Another cheat sheet is this list of odds from the top bookmaker in Las Vegas.

Time to look at our who’s hot and who isn’t:

Who’s Hot in the field for the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open

Player Sanderson Farms Fortinet Champ. Tour Champ. Korn Ferry Tour Champ. BMW Champ. Nationwide Children’s Northern Trust Boise Open Wyndham Champ. Pinnacle Bank WGC FedEx St. Jude Barracuda Champ. 3M Open
Sam Burns
(278.5 pts)
Win
(132)
DNP T18
(32)
DNP 8
(50)
DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(50)
DNP DNP
Kevin Na
(184.83 pts)   WD
DNP CUT
(-10)
3
(90)
DNP T17
(33)
DNP T8
(25)
DNP T2
(33.33)
DNP T23
(13.5)
DNP DNP
Erik Van Rooyen
(173.83 pts)
DNP DNP T22
(28)
DNP 5
(70)
DNP 7
(27.5)
DNP T37
(4.33)
DNP DNP Win
(44)
T58
(0)
Sungjae Im
(166.67 pts)
T31
(19)
DNP T20
(30)
DNP 3
(90)
DNP T16
(17)
DNP T24
(8.67)
DNP T46
(2)
DNP DNP
Abraham Ancer
(156 pts)
DNP DNP T9
(45)
DNP T9
(45)
DNP T64
(0)
DNP DNP DNP Win
(66)
DNP DNP
Sahith Theegala
(145 pts)
T8
(50)
T47
(3)
DNP 6
(40)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T34
(5.33)
DNP
Hayden Buckley
(143 pts)
T4
(80)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T7
(18.33)
DNP T26
(8)
DNP DNP DNP
Si Woo Kim
(138.33 pts)
T8
(50)
T11
(39)
DNP DNP T29
(21)
DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP T2
(33.33)
DNP 65
(0)
DNP DNP
Hideki Matsuyama
(138.17 pts)
DNP T6
(60)
T26
(24)
DNP T46
(4)
DNP T43
(3.5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T2
(50)
DNP DNP
Trey Mullinax
(138 pts)
T4
(80)
CUT
(-10)
DNP 2
(66.67)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T16
(11.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Stephan Jaeger
(136.67 pts)
T26
(24)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP 42
(2.67)
DNP
Maverick McNealy
(133.5 pts)
DNP 2
(100)
DNP DNP T63
(0)
DNP T27
(11.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T18
(10.67)
T16
(11.33)
Mito Pereira
(129.33 pts)
T31
(19)
3
(90)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T39
(3.67)
T6
(20)
Joseph Bramlett
(128 pts)
T58
(0)
T42
(8)
DNP Win
(88)
DNP T27
(15.33)
DNP T20
(10)
CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T20
(10)
T65
(0)
Nick Watney
(124.33 pts)
T2
(100)
T30
(20)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T43
(2.33)
T34
(5.33)
Corey Conners
(121 pts)
T17
(33)
DNP T22
(28)
DNP T22
(28)
DNP T8
(25)
DNP DNP DNP T36
(7)
DNP DNP
Viktor Hovland
(113.5 pts)
DNP DNP T5
(70)
DNP T17
(33)
DNP T43
(3.5)
DNP DNP DNP T36
(7)
DNP DNP
Cameron Young
(112.67 pts)
T2
(100)
CUT
(-10)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T10
(26.67)
DNP T32
(6)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Will Zalatoris
(107 pts)
T14
(36)
T11
(39)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T29
(7)
DNP T8
(25)
DNP DNP
Harris English
(105.5 pts)
DNP DNP T18
(32)
DNP T26
(24)
DNP T31
(9.5)
DNP DNP DNP 4
(40)
DNP DNP
Adam Svensson
(100 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T51
(0)
DNP T27
(15.33)
DNP Win
(88)
DNP T20
(10)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
Louis Oosthuizen
(97.83 pts)
DNP DNP T14
(36)
DNP T38
(12)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
DNP T2
(33.33)
Webb Simpson
(95.33 pts)
DNP T30
(20)
DNP DNP T12
(38)
DNP T47
(1.5)
DNP T7
(18.33)
DNP T15
(17.5)
DNP DNP
Alex Smalley
(93.33 pts)
T31
(19)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T15
(23.33)
DNP T4
(53.33)
DNP T48
(0.67)
T29
(7)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Cameron Tringale
(92.83 pts)
T11
(39)
T22
(28)
DNP DNP T52
(0)
DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T16
(11.33)
Bronson Burgoon
(90 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T16
(34)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(66.67)
DNP T32
(6)
T60
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Marc Leishman
(88.5 pts)
DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP 51
(0)
DNP T47
(1.5)
DNP DNP DNP T36
(7)
DNP DNP
Talor Gooch
(86.17 pts)
DNP T4
(80)
DNP DNP T57
(0)
DNP T31
(9.5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Roger Sloan
(85.67 pts)
T14
(36)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP T2
(33.33)
DNP DNP 6
(20)
T16
(11.33)
Chad Ramey
(82.33 pts)
T63
(0)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T11
(26)
DNP T18
(21.33)
DNP T7
(18.33)
DNP T4
(26.67)
DNP DNP DNP
Scottie Scheffler
(77.5 pts)
DNP DNP T22
(28)
DNP T22
(28)
DNP T43
(3.5)
DNP DNP DNP 14
(18)
DNP DNP
Henrik Norlander
(75 pts)
T4
(80)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Greyson Sigg
(74.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T30
(20)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T34
(10.67)
DNP Win
(44)
DNP T35
(5)
DNP T15
(11.67)
DNP
Jason Kokrak
(73.67 pts)
DNP DNP T11
(39)
DNP T15
(35)
DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP T34
(8)
DNP DNP
Scott Piercy
(70.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T11
(39)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T64
(0)
DNP T15
(11.67)
DNP DNP 3
(30)
T71
(0)
Aaron Wise
(69.5 pts)
T26
(24)
DNP DNP DNP T17
(33)
DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP T46
(1.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP
Andrew Landry
(66.67 pts)
T4
(80)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP T51
(0)
CUT
(-3.33)
Charley Hoffman
(65.5 pts)
T39
(11)
T22
(28)
DNP DNP T38
(12)
DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Nate Lashley
(60.33 pts)
T17
(33)
T16
(34)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP 73
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Joaquin Niemann
(60 pts)
DNP DNP 29
(21)
DNP T29
(21)
DNP T47
(1.5)
DNP DNP DNP T17
(16.5)
DNP DNP
Taylor Moore
(59.67 pts)
T17
(33)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T10
(26.67)
DNP T10
(13.33)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP
K.H. Lee
(58.17 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP T12
(38)
DNP T47
(1.5)
DNP T24
(8.67)
DNP T54
(0)
DNP T6
(20)
Charl Schwartzel
(58 pts)
DNP DNP DNP DNP T17
(33)
DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP T2
(33.33)
Scott Stallings
(56 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T6
(60)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP T18
(10.67)
T39
(3.67)
Stewart Cink
(50.67 pts)
DNP DNP T26
(24)
DNP T38
(12)
DNP T21
(14.5)
DNP DNP DNP T43
(3.5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)

How Player Rankings are Computed

Who’s Not Hot in the field for the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open

Player Sanderson Farms Fortinet Champ. Tour Champ. Korn Ferry Tour Champ. BMW Champ. Nationwide Children’s Northern Trust Boise Open Wyndham Champ. Pinnacle Bank WGC FedEx St. Jude Barracuda Champ. 3M Open
Martin Trainer
(-26.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
T58
(0)
Kyle Stanley
(-25 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Jonas Blixt
(-23.33 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP DNP
Brian Gay
(-21.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP T51
(0)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Matthew NeSmith
(-21.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
T51
(0)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
J.T. Poston
(-21 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP T28
(7.33)
Hank Lebioda
(-20 pts)
DNP CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP CUT
(-3.33)
DNP DNP DNP WD
(-1.67)
Kevin Chappell
(-20 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Tyler McCumber
(-20 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
(-5)
DNP T15
(11.67)
DNP DNP CUT
(-3.33)
CUT
(-3.33)
Seung-Yul Noh
(-18.67 pts)
CUT
(-10)
CUT
(-10)
DNP T71
(0)
DNP CUT
(-6.67)
DNP T26
(8)
DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

How Player Rankings are Computed

The Buzz

Off to Sin City:

The oldest running fall event, Shriners Hospitals for Children has all of the glamour of Las Vegas on a course that a lot of players like to play on. For some, this will be a fun week with a little bit of golf mixed in with the fast-paced action of Las Vegas.

Founded in 1983 as the Panasonic Las Vegas Pro-Celebrity Classic, the event has undergone six name changes in the event’s history. Frys.Com became the title sponsor for the event in 2006, replacing its former title, the Michelin Championship at Las Vegas. 2007 was the final year of Fry’s involvement, and in 2008 Justin Timberlake took on the duties of becoming the tournament presenter with Shriners Hospitals for Children sponsoring the event. Timberlake is no longer associated with the tournament.

At the tournament’s inception, the tournament managers prided themselves on running a tournament that stood out amongst the slew of annual PGA events. It was the first event to offer a total purse of $1 million; at the trophy presentation, the winner used to receive his trophy with two showgirls by his side. Though these ideas help separate the event from others, the most drastic deviation from the norm is the tournament’s format, which in a way, “borrowed” the format at the Bob Hope Open.

In its inception, the tournament was played over five rounds at between three and four courses. However, in 2003, when the original tournament founders abdicated control to another volunteer organization, the event was immediately switched to the more conventional four-round format. Over the years, courses have been dropped, and for the 13th straight year, it’s only played on the TPC Summerlin.

One thing about this event, it’s always lovely winning an event, but for some of its past champions, they never got back to the winner’s circle again on the PGA Tour. Look at the 21 past winners since 2000, only eleven Bryson DeChambeau (2019), Patrick Cantlay (2018), Webb Simpson (2014), Ryan Moore (2012), Kevin Na (2011), Jonathan Byrd (2010), Martin Laird (2021 & ’09), George McNeill (2007), Troy Matteson (2006), Stuart Appleby (2003) and Bob Estes (2001) won again on the PGA Tour. The others, Rod Pampling (2017), Smylie Kaufman (2016), Ben Martin (2015), Marc Turnesa (2008), Wes Short Jr. (2005), Andre Stolz (2004), Phil Tataurangi (2002), and Billy Andrade (2000) never made it back to the winner’s circle on the PGA Tour, and some of them don’t even play anymore on the PGA Tour.

So why are so many players playing?

You have to play in the fall now. It’s not a “junk” section. We are talking about 9 official events in 10 weeks. That’s a fifth of the 47 events on the PGA Tour. Between the start of the season and the Sentry Tournament of Champions in January, there will be $60 million in prize money given away, which isn’t peanuts.

So that is why you are seeing more and more marquee players now playing. It’s a small fortune they are playing for these days. To think just 25 years ago, in 1996, the year Tiger Woods joined the PGA Tour, Tom Lehman won the money list with $1,780,159.  Woods won that year and earned $297,000.  This week is the.3rd PGA Tour event and Sam Burns and Max Homa have won $1,260,000. 53 years ago, Frank Beard won the money title with $164,707, about the same amount that Austin Cook, who is 24th on the money list, has won in 2 starts this year. It took Ben Hogan 16 years on the PGA Tour before he won his first $100,000. Going a step further, Gene Sarazen collected money on the PGA Tour between 1920 and 1976, and this may seem hard to believe, but in his 56 years of playing, he won 38 times, seven of them majors, and only won $77,787. Peter Malnati is 42nd on the money list with winnings of $82,567 in just two starts, oh how times have changed.

One last thing this week is the 25th anniversary of Tiger Woods’s first win on the PGA Tour. In 1996 he won the Shriners by beating Davis Love III in a playoff. For the victory, Tiger won $297,000. Hayden Buckley, Andrew Landry, Trey Mullinax and Henrik Norlander won $280,000 for finishing T-4th at the Sanderson Farms Championship last week.

Course information:

TPC Summerlin was designed by Bobby Weed and Fuzzy Zoeller in 1992. The Par 71 course measures 7,255 yards. It has a course rating of 74.3 and a slope rating of 139. The tees, fairways, and rough all comprise of 419 Bermuda Grass, cut at 3/8″, 3/8″, and 2″ respectively. The greens consist of a 1/8″ cut of A-1/A-4 Creeping Bent Grass. This shortcut mixed with the always speedy Bent Grass explains the rather Stimpmeter reading of 11 feet. As for hazards, the course features 99 sand bunkers (with 51 around the greens), and water comes into play on four holes.

The signature hole at TPC Summerlin is the short 341-yard par-four 15th hole. The sizeable elevated green is reachable from the tee; however, numerous bunkers guard the green, making the play risky, but possibly very rewarding. As for accolades, Golf Digest rated this as the fourth “Best in State” course for 1995-96, and the fifth-best for 1997-98. Also, GolfWeek awarded it 98th in the category of “America’s 100 Best Modern Courses” for 1997.

Last year was the 13th time that Summerlin was the only course used.  In 2009 they made significant changes, switching par to 71 by making the third hole a long par 4 at 473 yards. In addition to this change, trees were added along the fairways’ right side on Nos. 9 and 16, both par 5s. The rough also was grown longer than in years past, and for holes 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, and 16, the fairways are going to be between 3 and 5 yards narrower than in 2008. All of these changes were made to try and make the course play a bit tougher, but the key to this course playing tough is wind.  Without it the pros have a field day on it.

Lots of birdies are made on this course, last year, 1,979 were made along with 74 eagles. The finish is demanding with the par 3 17th hole played the 2nd hardest hole at 3.143, while the 18th hole was the 10th hardest at 3.910.

LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT VITAL STATS THAT ARE IMPORTANT FOR THOSE PLAYING AT TPC Summerlin

This is based on the most vital stats from TPC Summerlin based on data from last year’s Shriners Hospital for Children and using data from all the players in the field with stats from 2022.
TPC Summerlin has a long history on the PGA Tour. It was the first part of the Shriners rota in 1992 just after the course opened when the tournament was 90 holes and utilized three courses. Starting in 1995, it was the home course of the event and became the tournament’s sole venue in 2008. The course has always been well respected, and for a desert course is one of the hardest. The Par 71 course measures 7,255 yards. It has a course rating of 74.3 and a slope rating of 139. The players love the course, many since they can score low on a typical day without wind.

Last year with calm conditions, the course played easily at a 68.34 average which ranked it 48th of 51 courses. Now of the three courses that played easier (Sherwood C.C., Caves Valley & Kapalua), they didn’t have full-field events so the course was the easiest in events that had full fields. The same with 2020, it played to a 68.88 average, which ranked 39th on the PGA Tour. Only two courses played easier that year, and both were at the American Express, so TPC Summerlin played as the easiest full-field course on the PGA Tour in 2020. The course played to a 69.13 average in the previous year, which ranked 43rd on the PGA Tour. But the year before in 2018, in very high winds up to 25 mph on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the course played a lot tougher than previous years with a 71.54 scoring average, a half over par. It was the 10th hardest course on the PGA Tour, showing how weather can affect things. In 2017 Summerlin played to a 69.62 average and was the 40th most demanding course on tour. So with that, it changed the minds of many who thought the course was a bomber’s delight, it isn’t. If you look at the winners of this event since 2008, only two bombers won the event, Bryson DeChambeau won in 2019 and Smylie Kaufman in 2016. But in looking at all of the other winners, champions like Martin Laird, Rod Pampling, Ben Martin, Webb Simpson, Ryan Moore, and Marc Turnesa have always been part of the bottom third of drivers, so they don’t hit it far. Last year’s winner Martin Laird was 15th during the week in driving distance (was T-104th for 2021). The year before, champion Kevin Na was 25th at the Shriners in driving distance, but for the year was 170th, one of the shortest hitters on tour. In 2019 before Bryson DeChambeau made his stunning transformation in becoming the longest hitter on tour, he was 30th for the week and T-34th over 2019 while Patrick Cantlay in 2018 was T-8th in driving distance and 33rd for the year. So what kind of players wins at TPC Summerlin?

Of the 14 champions since 2007, six of them were in the top-five of greens in regulation, and only two winners, Patrick Cantlay in 2017 was T-17th, and Kevin Na were both higher than 15th (Na was 40th when he won in 2011). Another essential item is putting. Six of the winners were in the top-10 in putting average with only three, not in the top-25 (Laird was T-25th last year, Na was 1st in 2020). The one stat that seems important is that of the previous 14 winners, nine of them were in double digits in under-par figures on the par 4s. 2010 winner Jonathan Byrd was the best at 14 under, in 2017 Rod Pampling was 13 under, 2018 champion Patrick Cantlay was 9 under on the par 4s, Bryson DeChambeau was 12 under in 2019 while Kevin Na was 10 under in 2020 the same as Laird was last year.

In looking at the course averages from last year, the one thing that sticks out is that TPC Summerlin was the 37th hardest course to drive in the fairway in calm conditions. In 2020 it was the 35th hardest course to drive it in the fairway in calm conditions, but in windy conditions in 2018, it was the 8th hardest course to drive. In 2017 it was 7th, the hardest in looking at the history of the course. In 2016 it ranked 11th, and in 2015 it was 17th, so hitting it straight is essential. In looking at our champions since 2009, all of them except Kevin Na finished in the top-20 with last year’s winner Martin Laird ranked T-5th, 2020 winner Kevin Na, ranked T-25th in driving accuracy. Some other keys to playing well are making lots of birdies; last year Martin Laird made 22, In 2020 Kevin Na had 26 birdies and ranked 3rd. In 2019 DeChambeau had 22 birdies, while in 2018, Cantlay had 20 birdies, which are tied for the most of the tournament and an average of one in every 3 and a half holes played.

One essential item is the weather. This year, every day will be mostly perfect in Las Vegas with lots of sun and temperatures ranging from 83 degrees on Thursday to 71 on Friday, 76 on Saturday, and 79 on Sunday. Last year, the wind was very low, averaging about 6 mph each day, but this year it will be 912 to 13 mph on Thursday and Friday, then drop to 8 mph on Saturday and be at 9 mph on Sunday. So look for the scores to be about the same as last year.

So in looking at our four categories, we see how much driving hit straight and far makes a difference. So we pick Strokes Gained off-the-tee because driving is the key to playing well. For Laird last year he was 26th while Na last year ranked 54th, but in 2019 Bryson DeChambeau was 6th, and in 2018 winner Patrick Cantlay was 1st. Our second important category is proximity to the hole. The course ranked T-23rd last year, and 50th in greens hit last year. Last year’s winner Martin Laird ranked T-21st, Kevin Na, was terrible, ranking 60th, but in 2019 DeChambeau was 10th. Also, wind plays a significant factor in this stat. In 2018 in the wind, it was 5th in Proximity to Hole and 28th in Greens in Regulation, which means many greens will be hit. Next up, we pick not only scrambling, but sand saves because if the greens are missed, you have to still make par. Last year the field averaged 29th in scrambling, and with 51 greenside bunkers, the field was 20th in sand save percentage, so our third category is Strokes Gained Around-the-Green. Laird was great in this stat ranked 4th. Our last category is par breakers, the combination of birdies and eagles made during the round. Making lots of birdies and eagles is always essential, especially on a desert course like TPC Summerlin. Last year Laird was T-4th, in 2020 Na was 1st in Par Breakers while DeChambeau was T-8th in 2019, and Patrick Cantlay was T-2nd in 2018.

*Strokes Gained Tee-to-Green: Looks at the combination of length off the tee and accuracy, then getting the ball on the green, so it determines who is best at all of these items.

*Proximity to Hole: The average length of a shot going into the green leaves a player.

*Strokes Gained Around-the-Green: Looks at the combination of gaining strokes by getting up and down after missing a green.

*Par Breakers: Combination of birdies and eagles to get a percentage of holes played under par

116 of the 144 players from this year’s field with stats from 2022:

Click any column title in the table header to sort columns.

Here is a link to all 116 stats for those playing in the Shriners

 

DraftKings tips

*Here are the guys that cost the most on DraftKings this week:

  • Brooks Koepka – $11,100
  • Sam Burns- $10,900
  • Viktor Hovland – $10,600
  • Abraham Ancer – $10,400
  • Webb Simpson – $10,200
  • Will Zealotries- $10,100
  • Louis Oosthuizen – $9,900
  • Scottie Scheffler – $9,700
  • Hideki Matsuyama – $9,500
  • Harris English – $9,300
  • Sungjae Im – $9,200
  • Kevin Na – $9,100 WD
  • Si Woo Kim – $9,000

Another great field for this week.  After two events with weak fields, we will see strong fields this week, next, and the week after.  A bit puzzling why Brooks Koepka is at $11,100.  In five starts he was 2nd in 2017, T-4th in 2015, and missed three cuts.  Also puzzling, Koepka had a 2-2-0 Ryder Cup record so I have no idea why he is ranked first with such a big price.  Guess I don’t have to write anymore, you can see I am not going to pick Koepka at such a big price.  The same with Sam Burns at $10,900, I know he won last week but that doesn’t mean he will play well this week.  His TPC Summerlin record isn’t great when you consider in four starts his best finish is T-20th in 2018, so he is a no for me.  The same with Viktor Hovland at $10,600, he is coming off a terrible Ryder Cup where his record is 0-3-2. Will that spell over to this week, probably not but still don’t think the course and greens are good for Hovland.  I do like Abraham Ancer – $10,400, he was 4th in 2019 and last year and finished the season strongly.  Webb Simpson at $10,200 is also to be considered, was a winner in 2013 and been in the top ten four times.  Will Zealotries at $10,100 is my choice for the guy that will win this week, he is really playing well and looking to win.  The same with Louis Oosthuizen at $9,900, think he will do well, Louis has only played once in this event and was T-19th last year.  But the course is perfect for him and feel he does play well in the fall.  Scottie Scheffler is $9,700 and the big question will be if a win is close.  He is probably the best player on tour without a victory, could this be a good week for him?  I fear not, his play at TPC Summerlin hasn’t been very stellar, still, he is good and could possibly surprise us all.  Hideki Matsuyama at $9,500 is another that could do well this week, but in three starts his T-10th back in 2015 is his best finish, so I don’t think this will be a good week for him.  Harris English at $9,300 is a no for me, in seven starts played well once finishing T-4th in 2017 but I just don’t think his game suits a desert course.  Now the next three are big yes for me, love Sungjae Im at $9,200 think he will get a top ten, and who knows maybe even better.  Kevin Na at $9,100 is a good prospect, but he withdrew on Tuesday due to rib injury.  The same with Si Woo Kim at $9,000, he plays well at TPC Summerlin and can see it carry over this week.  Remember this, he was T-11th at Napa and T-8th last week in Mississippi, so he could be a top pick.

*Players in that $7,500 to $8,900 price range, which ones are worth the money?:

Like Cameron Tringale at $8,500 since he has played well on the course finishing T-2nd in 2016, remember he was T-22nd at Napa and T-11th last week in Mississippi.  Joaquin Niemann at $8,300 is always a good buy, he has played well at TPC Summerlin but I like the fact that he makes a lot of DraftKings points, in the last 12 months’ averages 69.91 per event.  Matthew Wolff at $8,200 is another good choice, can see his game come together he was T-2nd last year and can see another great finish this week.  I also like Mito Pereira at $7,800 even if he is playing TPC Summerlin for the first time.  Maverick McNealy at $7,700 is a good choice, can see some good things come out of him in the future.  Patton Kizzire at $7,500 is also a great buy, he has played well at TPC Summerlin and can see some good golf come out of him.

*Some of the “bargains” this week at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open

Taylor Moore at $7,300 is a very good pick considering that he does make a lot of Draftkings points and can see that happening this week.  Rickie Fowler at $7,300 is worth a gamble, we know his story and how he has struggled the last two years.  But can see him making a comeback, he has to play better soon or else started losing exemptions, he loves hanging out with the likes of Jordan Speith, Justin Thomas, and Smylie Kaufman so he needs to start playing better.  Joseph Bramlett at $7,200 is a good choice because he played well on the Korn Ferry Tour and can see that carrying over.  Also, Stewart Cink at $7,100 is a great buy, he won’t win but he will make the cut and earn you a lot of points for a small fee.  Hard to not say yes to Ian Poulter at $7,000, he can earn a lot of points.  Also maybe Draftkings didn’t get the memo at Cameron Young was runner-up last week at the Sanderson Farms, he is only $7,000 this week.  Matthew NeSmith is $6,700 and he was T-8th last year in this event and T-18th in 2020,   Also watch Nick Watney at $6,600 he used to play well in this event, he was runner-up in 2011 and has played well this year, he was runner-up last week in Mississippi.  The best buy could be Andrew Landry at only $6,300.  He was T-4th last week in Mississippi.

Here are some of the secrets of what it takes to play well at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open:

The key stat for the winner:
  • Making lots of birdies is important.  The average for the last 17 winners since the course reverted to a 72 hole affair is is 22 under and the winners average making 24 birdies per event or six per round.  So the secret is to make a lot of birdies.
Here are some more key stats to look to for this week:
  • With fairways that are wide open, fairways with lots of rolls, dominating the par 5s has been a key.  It’s also interesting to note that in the last 16 years the winners have averaged 10 under par on the par 4s.  Last year Martin Laird was 9 under on them, in 2020 Kevin Na was 10 under the year before Bryson DeChambeau was 12 under the best of anyone in the field.  In 2018 Patrick Cantlay was 1 over the only time a winner has been over par but remember it was very windy.  In 2017 Rod Pampling was 13 under on the par 4s, in 2016 Smylie Kaufman was 6 under on the par 4s while Ben Martin was 9 under in 2015 and in 2014 Webb Simpson was 12 under the same as Ryan Moore was in 2012. Jonathan Byrd was the best at 14 under in 2010 while the least low was 6 under by George McNeill in 2007.
  • Being an accurate driver, a long driver or a person that hits a lot of greens doesn’t give you a big advantage.  Scrambling is very important, TPC Summerlin ranked 29th on the PGA Tour last year.  If there ever was a tournament that favors the newcomer, this is it.
  • Most of the time the weather is wonderful, it should be that way this year, with very little wind the first two days but getting breezy over the weekend..
  • You have to realize where your are at, in Las Vegas “lady luck” is very important in winning, a lot of players that you would never think would win have found the “luck factor” in victory.

Who to watch for at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open

Best Bets:

Will Zalatoris

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T5

I am going to ride him to victory, it’s not far off. Was T-11th at Fortinet, T-14th in Mississippi last week while shooting a 2nd round 61. He is 29 under for his 8 rounds in 2022. Last year finished T-5th, just two back of getting into the playoff. This finish was important in him getting to play the rest of 2021 on the PGA Tour.

Abraham Ancer

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
4 CUT T4 CUT CUT

Was 4th at the Shrines in 2019 and 2021. Ended his season strongly with a T-9th at the Tour and BMW Championship, won the WGC-FedEx St. Jude.

Viktor Hovland

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
First time playing in this event

Playing in the Shriners for the first time.Great 2021 making it to the Tour Championship finishing T-5th, had a tough time at the Ryder Cup losing three matches and halving twice

Best of the rest:

Webb Simpson

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T13 T7 T15 T20 T31 T56 T4 Win T4 CUT

Has played well at Sanderson, won it in 2014, was T-4th in 2010 and ’15, T-7th in 2020, and T-13th last year. In 38 rounds is 124 under par and has been over par in just two rounds. Has shot in the 60s in his last 14 rounds. Started his year T-30th at Fortinet, had six top-tens in 2021.

Louis Oosthuizen

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T19

Had a terrific summer as he was runner-up four times including runner-up finishes in the U.S. Open and PGA Championship, was T-3rd at the British Open. Played at TPC Summerlin for the first time last year, shot 64 in the final round to finish T-19th.

Si Woo Kim

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T8 T55 T15 T25

Has been very consistent at TPC Summerlin, was T-8th last year and in 16 rounds has never been over par as he is 50 under par. Has been consistent in his first two starts of 2022, was T-11th at Fortinet and T-8th at Sanderson Farms.

Solid contenders

Matthew Wolff

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T2 T18

With his great length off the tee can have been able to dominate things at TPC Summerlin. Lost in a playoff last year and T-18th in 2020, in those eight rounds is 38 under par. His game showed signs of life starting at the U.S.Open., last week was T-17th at Sanderson Farms.

Harris English

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT T36 CUT T4 T16 T40 60

Only one top-ten at Shriners, T-4th in 2017. Great 2021 winning twice, was 1-2-0 in the Ryder Cup.

Sungjae Im

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
T13 T15

At TPC Summerlin was T-13th last year and T-15th in 2018, in both events was 30 under par. Was T-31st at Sanderson Farms last week, made it to the Tour Championship last year, played great in the fall last year including a T-2nd at the November Masters.

Long shots that could come through:

Maverick McNealy

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT T37 CUT

Has struggled at TPC Summerlin missing two cuts and T-37th in 2020. Had a solid 2021 getting to the BMW Championship, was 2nd at Fortinet.

Mito Pereira

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
First time playing in this event

Playing at TPC Summerlin for the first time was 3rd at Fortinet three weeks ago and T-31st at Sanderson Farms. Had a great summer winning twice on the Korn Ferry Tour in June and finishing T-5th at Barbasol, T-6th at 3M Open, and T-4th at Olympics.

Rickie Fowler

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT T4 T25 T22 T7

Was T-4th at the 2018 Shriners. 2021 was another trying year for Fowler, will see early if his game has returned or if he continues to struggle.

Have no idea which Brooks Koepka will show up this week:

Brooks Koepka

2021 ’20 ’19 ’18 ’17 ’16 ’15 ’14 ’13 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
CUT 2 CUT T4 CUT

He is such a Jekyll and Hyde type of player, he could either win this week or miss the cut, no indication which direction he’ll go. Can say this, was runner-up in this event in 2017 and was T-4th in 2015, but he missed the cut in 2014, ’16, and 2020 so you can see it’s a tough choice. No indication off his 2-2-0 Ryder Cup record, there is really no way to predict his direction this week.

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